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Old 01-05-2013, 04:53 PM   #66
Polux
Side-Kick
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 666
Default Re: How Long Was Bruce Wayne Actually Batman in this Trilogy?

Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueLightning View Post
He did that. The approach they took was different. Let me put it this way. At the end of TDK, Batman had worked non-stop for more than a year to put an end to organized crime. That ought to take a heavy toll on his body. That final battle left him gravely battered, gun wounded, and with a limp. Bruce would need time to heal, while the crooks Harvey put in prison where still there for argably 18 months, time enough to develop the Dent Act and giving Gordon the tools he needed to make the final strike to the organized crime. Batman wasn't needed, so Bruce took his time and efforts to do good as Bruce Wayne, namely with the energy project. Those things take time too. It was a more rounded approach if you think it through. It is fine if you don't like it though.
Funny thing, some time ago i was reading a Batman comic book, think it was Hush, and in the story he got really injured with a cracked skull and several broken bones, in the story, a few weeks later he's back into action and that made me think "Wait, this happens to Bruce a lot, right? Like, he gets badly injured constantly..." and realized how ridiculous is for a man with no supernatural powers to keep healing from this things like nothing happened and remain on top of "human potential"; I mean, boxers get permanently damaged for things that Bats faces in a nightly basis, yet, he keeps goin like it's nothing.

That's something that I loved about this version of the character; his humanity, how he got hurt really bad and how that leaves scars and consequences (sp?), yet, this extraordinary man, works through pain, sucks it up and keeps on fighting, never giving up, and you can tell that he's hurt, he's in pain while doing it.

I've read a lot of people here saying how much superior comics/TAS Batman is to Nolan's, and I'm sorry, I just don't see it (don't get me wrong, Batman is my favorite fictional character ever since I was a little kid); when comparing the Nolan movies to, say, Mask of the Phantasm (which I saw a couple of days ago), I found Bale's Bats to be much more capable, scarier, incredibly more intimidating, all around much more badass, this unstoppable force of nature; and I know that a lot of people are hung out on "Batgod" from the comics, yet somehow, overlook all the little moments during the trilogy that show us how smart and the gifted detective that he actually is.

These and many other reasons make Nolan and Bale's Batman my favorite version of the character, above both comics and animated shows.

Polux

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