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Old 06-27-2013, 02:15 PM   #4
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Default Re: The Glasses Problem

Quote:
Originally Posted by DrCosmic View Post
The Planet people weren't close enough to recognize him easily, but enough to understand that Clark looks like Superman.
Maybe? I don't remember them being that close. As close as they were, they'd know that they're both tall guys with black hair. That's not super specific.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DrCosmic View Post
Also, it was announced on national TV that Lois and not-yet-called-Superman knew each other. Lois clearly has the exclusive. People looking for Superman have her as their #1 lead. For the people at the Planet, that in tandem with the big kiss would strongly indicate a relationship.
I disagree. Perry knows Lois was tracking this guy down, that's how they're connected. A reasonably intelligent person isn't going to assume a romantic relationship based solely on one kiss between two attractive people in the middle of a stressful crisis.

Of course, Clark and Lois starting a relationship might get Perry thinking along those lines, but it's hardly proof and a veteran journalist like Perry wouldn't assume that Clark is Superman just based on that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DrCosmic View Post
And unfortunately, the flimsiness of Superman's disguise is part of the real world pop culture discourse. Not mentioning it doesn't work like it would for another hero.
I disagree. If you never put him in a situation where the disguise would fail, the audience probably won't think much about it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DrCosmic View Post
Overthinking it would be 'well, the NSA can do facial tracking on street cameras, so eventually they'd find him!' 'How did Clark get the exact job he wanted so quickly in this economy, right after such an epic disaster?' is overthinking it. Why Steve Lombard can't put two and two together, and no one else bothers to try to, that's pretty simple, pretty in your face.
I disagree that Steve Lobard has two and two to put together in the first place. All he has is the fact that he saw Superman for a couple of seconds at a distance. I see no reason to assume that he, or anyone else at the Planet staff, would recognize Clark as Superman right away. I see reason to think why Perry might figure it out after a while, and I think that's a cool rout to take with the story, but from the events of the film I feel like Clark has a little cover from being discovered by his co-workers.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DrCosmic View Post
The idea of Superman never coming into close contact with anyone is interesting, however, I don't think that's reasonable. He never speaks to the people he rescues? No one can get a shot of this guy?
I never said that he should never get in close contact with anyone. I said that he should never sit down for an interview or photos. There's a difference. Sure, he'd probably talk to the people he rescues. Odds are, none of the people he rescues will ever meet him as Clark Kent. And he's fast enough that, should he choose to avoid being photographed, then yes, no one will be able to get a shot of him.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DrCosmic View Post
Writing it so people think about it sounds good in theory, but afaik, that's done by making something cool. No one thinks about the physics of a good fight scene because it's cool to watch. I don't know if you can make the glasses 'cool.'
I disagree. Making something "cool" isn't how you get the audience to not think about something. At least, it is a way but it's not the only way. And, in fact, in this case making it cool wouldn't do that because it would draw attention to it.

Another way is to tailor your plot and the interactions of your characters so that the question just doesn't come up in the minds of the audience. If you don't draw attention to the idea that the Daily Planet staff got a good look at Superman's face, the audience probably won't think much about it. If you never put Superman in a position where he sits down and talks to someone who might see him as Clark, the audience won't think much about it. If you never have Superman pose for photographs or give a public recorded interview, the audience won't think much about it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DrCosmic View Post
Perry, like the Smallville people would likely be protective, and Jenny would follow suit. The loose cannon, and I think he'd make a great sub story arc for Luthor to get the info, is Steve Lombard. He's a relatively unscrupulous guy.
This is based on the assumption that they were close enough and looking at him long enough to see a significant resemblance between Clark and Superman, and that's not how it looked when I saw it. Looked to me like they were a couple hundred feet away with a bunch of soldiers and debris in between them and Superman, and he was standing in profile from their perspective, and after a couple of seconds he turned away to deal with Zod.

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