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Old 10-15-2012, 09:02 PM   #26
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Default Re: Frank Miller's The Dark Knight Returns Animated - Part 1

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Cool thanks, Too me The Dark Knight Returns Superman looks like a bad Elvis impersonator, even in the comic.


P.S Why isn't there a thread for "Superman: Unbound" yet?
All this time I was trying to figure out what's wrong with this superman, but now I realize it.

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Old 10-16-2012, 04:28 AM   #27
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Default Re: Frank Miller's The Dark Knight Returns Animated - Part 1

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Cool thanks, Too me The Dark Knight Returns Superman looks like a bad Elvis impersonator, even in the comic.
Yeah I get what you mean, not sure why Miller went for that look.

That's a great find Binker not sure I'd have noticed had it not been pointed out.

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Old 10-19-2012, 02:38 AM   #28
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Default Re: Frank Miller's The Dark Knight Returns Animated - Part 1

Elvis himself looked like an older husky Elvis impersonator in the '70s as he got older and huskier, and I'm an Elvis fan so I mean no disrespect to the king, R.I.P.

Frank Miller explained in Comics Journal #101 (1985) that Superman is 50-years-old in Dark Knight Returns and looks like he's 50. So he's older looking, bulkier, huskier with age, and his (and Batman's) physic is stylistically exaggerated in a cartoony art style (if you want to see a more photo-realistic looking older Superman then look at Kingdom Come by Alex Ross), but he's not fat, Frank Miller didn't draw him with a big belly and double chin.




I love the classic Superman wink moment.



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Old 10-19-2012, 07:29 AM   #29
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Default Re: Frank Miller's The Dark Knight Returns Animated - Part 1

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Elvis himself looked like an older husky Elvis impersonator in the '70s as he got older and huskier, and I'm an Elvis fan so I mean no disrespect to the king, R.I.P.

Frank Miller explained in Comics Journal #101 (1985) that Superman is 50-years-old in Dark Knight Returns and looks like he's 50. So he's older looking, bulkier, huskier with age, and his (and Batman's) physic is stylistically exaggerated in a cartoony art style (if you want to see a more photo-realistic looking older Superman then look at Kingdom Come by Alex Ross), but he's not fat, Frank Miller didn't draw him with a big belly and double chin.




I love the classic Superman wink moment.


Thanks for the information theMan-Bat. I just realized something, Superman is younger then Batman in The Dark Knight Returns. Clark is 50, Bruce is 55.

P.S Hey theMan-Bat, What's your opinion on the upcoming Superman: Unbound animated movie?

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Old 10-19-2012, 05:01 PM   #30
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Default Re: Frank Miller's The Dark Knight Returns Animated - Part 1

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Elvis himself looked like an older husky Elvis impersonator in the '70s as he got older and huskier, and I'm an Elvis fan so I mean no disrespect to the king, R.I.P.

Frank Miller explained in Comics Journal #101 (1985) that Superman is 50-years-old in Dark Knight Returns and looks like he's 50. So he's older looking, bulkier, huskier with age, and his (and Batman's) physic is stylistically exaggerated in a cartoony art style (if you want to see a more photo-realistic looking older Superman then look at Kingdom Come by Alex Ross), but he's not fat, Frank Miller didn't draw him with a big belly and double chin.




I love the classic Superman wink moment.


Awesome info as always

Didn't know that he was 50. Btw where do u keep getting the Miller interview bits from?

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Old 10-22-2012, 09:14 AM   #31
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Default Re: Frank Miller's The Dark Knight Returns Animated - Part 1

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Thanks for the information theMan-Bat. I just realized something, Superman is younger then Batman in The Dark Knight Returns. Clark is 50, Bruce is 55.

P.S Hey theMan-Bat, What's your opinion on the upcoming Superman: Unbound animated movie?
My opinion of it depends on how close it is to Superman: Brainiac (2008) by Geoff Johns. I don't like the death of Jonathan Kent in Superman: Brainiac by Geoff Johns. Unlike the importance of Batman's parents deaths and avenging their deaths, the death of Superman's foster parents is nonessential and avenging their deaths is not what Superman is about at all. Making Superman a double orphan is redundant. Having parents helps make him more human and relatable. His living human foster parents helped keep Superman grounded and helped him keep his humanity, which made him relatable. Jonathan Kent’s advice directed the man. Superman is at his best when the man part is remembered. That is the moral of John Byrne's The Man of Steel (1986) (Superman's Year One) and the moral of Mark Waid and Alex Ross' Kingdom Come (1996) (Superman's version of Dark Knight Returns). To not make the super more important than the man.



In Wonder Woman: Spirit of Truth (2001), by Paul Dini and Alex Ross, Superman explains to Wonder Woman how important his grounded humanity is to him.

In Superman: Peace on Earth (1999), by Paul Dini and Alex Ross, as Superman struggles to prevent world hunger, he learns from a lesson Jonathan Kent taught him about planting seeds during farming and the old proverb "Give a man a fish and he eats for a day, teach a man to fish and he can feed himself for a lifetime."

The move by Geoff Johns to have Jonathan Kent die off lead to Superman becoming less connected to humanity along with the New Krypton fiasco, eventually leading up to the nu52 alienated Superman with both of his foster parents dead. A Superman who feels alienated, out of place and pines for Krypton. I prefer Superman as the cheerful, secure upbeat hero with no angst-ridden longing to return to Krypton and regularly spending his spare time in a Fortress shrine to a dead planet in solitude. Superman having a grounded, humble farm out-look at heart is endearing, and how he was raised. That is where he draws his strength. His wholesome outlook. His morals, his values, truth, justice and the American way. Clark didn't even know of his Kryptonian heritage as he was raised assimilated into Earths Kansas farm culture as a baby. So he wouldn't see Earth from an immigrant perspective or an orphan perspective. He grew up in a very loving household raised by two Earthlings that were parents in every conceivable way. He would actually have a problem trying to understand what being Kryptonian is all about. All he has really known his entire life is Earthlings and Earth culture. Batman is a man now, but he still needs Alfred. As Alfred is the one father figure character with the proper authority to talk Batman down, Jonathan Kent is the one father figure character with the proper authority to talk Superman down. Jonathan Kent serves as a confidant and father figure. It's such a waste to kill him off. Jonathan and Martha are his parental figures, as Alfred is Batman's parental figure. Alfred is much more than just an English butler. For all effects Alfred is Bruce's parent, since he raised Bruce like a son, becoming more like both a father and mother than a butler. The bottom line is that both Jonathan and Alfred are father figures. And we need advisers, guides in our lives...at any age. Removing that person from Superman's present cast is a loss, diminishing his cast. As Frank Miller enhanced Batman's cast by making Alfred a living father figure that raised Bruce, rather than the silly butler Bruce Wayne hired to clean and cook. John Byrne enhanced Superman's cast by making Jonathan Kent a living father figure that Clark can talk to, rather than the tragic dead guy. John Byrne explained, "I decided to go back to Seigel and Shuster and eliminate Superboy from my version -- but keeping certain elements by retaining Ma and Pa Kent as viable still living characters."
http://www.byrnerobotics.com/forum/f...s.asp?TID=6045
John Byrne explained in Amazing Heroes #96 (1986), "I've always felt their deaths were unnecessary. In my version he's still got Ma and Pa Kent to go home to, and they are his links to the ordinary world. They make no demands on him apart from the fact that he is their son. They don't make demands on him as Superman. They don't make demands on him as Clark Kent, reporter. He is just their son, and they love him as their son. Ma and Pa Kent are his hook into normal life, something he very much needs, especially as the world makes greater and greater demands on Superman."
John Byrne's change to keep the Kents alive was much more minor than Siegel's own alteration to the original origin. Jerry Siegel changed the origin from Action Comics #1 (1938) where a passing motorist (singular) found the child, who took him to a orphanage. Where, so far as anything indicated in the text revealed, he remained until he became an adult. He acquired the name "Clark Kent" from unknown sources, presumably from someone at the orphanage. That was replaced by Siegel himself with the Superman #1 (1939) origin where the Kents find him, name him Clark Kent and raise him, giving him a loving home and family. John Byrne saw more potential in the Kents then even Jerry Siegel did and turned them into living viable characters, which was quickly brought to the Ruby-Spears Superman (1988) TV series, Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman (1993-1997) TV series, Superman: The Animated Series (1996-2000) TV series and even the Justice League (2001-2004) TV series with the "Comfort and Joy" (2003) episode.
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It's Superman's differences from Batman that makes him such an entertaining, fun character to me in his own way. Superman is a much more outwardly positive character. Superman is about inspiring hope, optimism. Trying to be a positive role model. Uplifting, not angst-ridden alienation and pinning for Krypton. Trying to make Superman all dark and grim like Batman doesn't make Superman cool, it makes him a poser. There is no more "real" version of Superman than the original Golden Age version that was conceived and created by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster. The Golden Age Superman by Jerry Siegel didn't pine for Krypton, didn't feel alienated. He was upbeat, smiling, secure hero, with a sly sense of humor. While Bill Finger and Bob Kane's Batman fought crime for personal vengeance after watched his parents murdered in front of him at 8 years old, he's avenging their deaths by "warring" on crime for the rest of his life. For Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster's Superman the love and guidance of his kindly foster parents was to become an important factor in shaping his future, and he used his abilities morally and patriotically to assist humanity, helping those in need, as the Kents taught him.

Writers should let Superman be the upbeat, positive character he is at heart. Some writers are capable of making dark stories without making Superman himself full of angst. I'm certain there is plenty of ridiculous angst in David Goyer's Man of Steel script. This quote from David Goyer is very telling, "In the case of Blade, he is acting heroically, but the rest of the world thinks he’s a vigilante, as is the case with Batman. I don’t think I’d ever be good to write Superman because it is the opposite…" [The interviewer says, "He's angst free."] David Goyer says, "Yeah, and I wouldn’t know the angle because I’m so angst ridden, so I wouldn’t know what to do with a character like that."
http://www.slashfilm.com/david-goyer...rite-superman/
Goyer explained in his introduction to Geoff Johns' Superman Secret Origin that Geoff Johns' Superman Secret Origin is a big influence on his script. "In which young Clark is told the truth about his heritage. He races out into the night, sobbing, stumbling through the cornfields. Eventually, his foster father, Jonathan, finds him. 'I don’t want to be someone else,' says Clark. 'I don’t want to be different. I want to be Clark Kent. I want to be your son.'" David Goyer says, "Right there in that moment, Geoff contextualized Superman in a way that I’m not sure has ever really been done before. I had an ‘aha’ experience when I read that. For the first time I was able to grasp how lonely Clark must have been when he was growing up. And what a sacrifice Clark must continually make by being Superman. As I write this, I am midway through my first draft of a new Superman screenplay. It’s a task that has stymied many talented filmmakers in the years since Donner’s film. And for all I know, it will end up stymieing me as well. But I’ve got one advantage that the screenwriters who came before me didn’t have– and that’s access to all the wonderful Superman stories written by Geoff Johns– first and foremost being the Secret Origin issues."
http://blastr.com/2010/12/did-david-goyer-give-away.php
David Goyer's Superman script also seems similar to Mark Waid's Superman Birthright, which follows a young Clark Kent as a globetrotting freelance reporter who hasn’t yet become a superhero. Goyer's script reportedly has Clark Kent reluctantly grappling with whether or not he should become Superman.
http://www.uproxx.com/gammasquad/201...eeding-bullet/
I certainly don't want an angst ridden, whiny "poor me" Clark Kent being reluctant to become Superman. One of the things that audiences disliked about Singer's Superman Returns, along with the lack of action, was the angst ridden, moping, sad emo Superman.
John Byrne was asked, is Superman the toughest superhero to write? John Byrne replied, "He shouldn't be. Superman is just a decent guy who does the right thing for the right reasons. He cares about his adopted planet, and the people on it. To the best of his ability, he tries to right the world's wrongs, but he understands that humanity must proceed along its own path, and the best he (or any single person) can do is try to keep us falling off that path.
Those who have trouble writing Superman are the people who do not believe such simple honesty and decency exist. They cannot find it in themselves, so they doubt it can be in others. They look for Superman's 'feet of clay', or they crank the basic model up to cliché levels."
http://www.byrnerobotics.com/forum/f....asp?TID=12986

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Awesome info as always

Didn't know that he was 50. Btw where do u keep getting the Miller interview bits from?
From my magazines, comics and my scanner. That one was from Comics Journal #101 (1985).

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Old 11-05-2012, 09:09 PM   #32
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Default Re: Frank Miller's The Dark Knight Returns Animated - Part 1

Part 2 will be released January 29th 2013. Cannot wait.
http://www.batman-on-film.com/batmovienews.html

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Old 11-05-2012, 11:58 PM   #33
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Old 11-06-2012, 12:07 AM   #34
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Default Re: Frank Miller's The Dark Knight Returns Animated - Part 1

Wow January is quick, I was expecting early Summer. Hellsyeah!

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Old 11-06-2012, 12:39 AM   #35
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Default Re: Frank Miller's The Dark Knight Returns Animated - Part 1

I was expecting February/March, but I'll take January. Hell, DKR2 is the first DTV to be released in January.

Also, little more details:
Quote:
Bonus content includes all-new featurettes, three classic DC Comics cartoons, a digital comic, and a preview of the upcoming animated feature Superman: Unbound. The runtime for the animated feature is listed at 74 minutes.

An official press release, with specific details on bonus content and much more, is expected to be released shortly.
Oh, and the covers:
http://www.worldsfinestonline.com/WF...s/blucover.jpg
http://www.worldsfinestonline.com/WF.../1dvdcover.jpg

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Old 11-06-2012, 04:50 AM   #36
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The covers for pt 1 & 2 are cool but they look nothing like show

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Old 11-06-2012, 10:23 AM   #37
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Default Re: Frank Miller's The Dark Knight Returns Animated - Part 1

Who's the artist for these covers?

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Old 11-06-2012, 10:57 AM   #38
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Default Re: Frank Miller's The Dark Knight Returns Animated - Part 1

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Part 2 will be released January 29th 2013. Cannot wait.
http://www.batman-on-film.com/batmovienews.html
Great to have an official date at last

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Old 11-06-2012, 11:13 AM   #39
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Default Re: Frank Miller's The Dark Knight Returns Animated - Part 1

So he goes back to the oval?

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Old 11-06-2012, 07:32 PM   #40
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Default Re: Frank Miller's The Dark Knight Returns Animated - Part 1

Great.

Hopefully a score release by then, too.

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Old 11-07-2012, 06:07 AM   #41
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Default Re: Frank Miller's The Dark Knight Returns Animated - Part 1

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The covers for pt 1 & 2 are cool but they look nothing like show
Yeah, they unfortunately do not accurately represent the look of the Dark Knight Returns comics or films. If it was up to me I would have used iconic Dark Knight Returns images. This would have been my choice for the front cover of Part 1:

This would have been my choice for the back cover of Part 1:

This would be my choice for the front cover for Part 2:

This would be my choice to be on the back cover of Part 2 along with the description of the film and credits:

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Old 11-07-2012, 06:26 AM   #42
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Default Re: Frank Miller's The Dark Knight Returns Animated - Part 1








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Old 11-08-2012, 10:40 AM   #43
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Default Re: Frank Miller's The Dark Knight Returns Animated - Part 1

UK fans, Part 1 is arriving on DVD/Blu-ray on November 26th!

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Batman-Knigh...2389201&sr=8-6

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Old 11-08-2012, 02:18 PM   #44
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Spoiler!!! Click to Read!:






Beautiful!

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Old 11-12-2012, 05:14 PM   #45
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Old 11-13-2012, 12:59 PM   #46
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Edit.

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Old 11-13-2012, 01:00 PM   #47
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Default Re: Frank Miller's The Dark Knight Returns Animated - Part 1


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And so was Walter White–way before he developed a suspicious cough. -Damon Lindelof



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Old 11-14-2012, 08:13 PM   #48
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Default Re: Frank Miller's The Dark Knight Returns Animated - Part 1

@theManBat

That is a beautiful understanding of the character. I often maligned Superman for being unrelatable due to his demigod power and unyielding optimisim and altruism. At times, Suoerman seemed more a charicature than an actual fleshed out character. Then I watched Superman vs. The Elite. It was a bit haughty and preachy in its message about standing for peaceful justice, but the story managed to brilliantly showcase what separates Superman from every pther hero. He isn't seeking atonement or vengeance. He isn't a chosen champion or enlisted into some army. He is someone with a gift that truly believes in the use of that gift for the benefit of others and not the benefitof self. He believes in the potential for even the worst to be redeemed (save for Lex Luthor and Darkseid). In many ways, Superman is more human than actual humans.

I also agree that a Superman who longs for Krypton is not only a less effective interpretation, but one that makes little sense. He has no personal memories of Krypton. All he knows is second hand from the tech in the fortress. His entire life has been spent on earth. I expect him to revere his heritage and to be curious about it, but his longing for Krpton makes him seem to be a morbid and disingenuous individual. That is something I appreciated about All Star Superman; the other Kryptonians checked Superman for being morbidly fascinated with a dead world he never knew.

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Old 11-15-2012, 11:57 PM   #49
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Default Re: Frank Miller's The Dark Knight Returns Animated - Part 1

Those gifs are fantastic.

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Old 12-07-2012, 06:39 PM   #50
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Default Re: Frank Miller's The Dark Knight Returns Animated - Part 1

ED LIU: "What would you say was the most controversial thing about Batman: The Dark Knight Returns?"

BRUCE TIMM: "After all these years, the most controversial aspect of the comic is literally Frank Miller’s version of Superman. It’s to the point that people are like, 'Oh, Frank Miller, he hates Superman! He loves Batman and hates Superman!' I don’t know that that’s really true, I think it’s an exaggeration of reality, but at the same time, the way Superman is treated in the comic is definitely unlike where anybody’s taken Superman as a character. Early on, there was a decision where we asked, 'Well, do we change what Superman’s role is in the story? Do we stay with it? Do we embrace it?' We decided we had to embrace it. For anybody who’s unfamiliar with the comic, Superman is basically the Super-Enforcer of the United States Government, and works against Batman. I think that’s a valid story to pursue, whether you think that Superman would actually do that or not, but it definitely creates an interesting dichotomy between the two different kinds of crime-fighters that Superman and Batman are. And, frankly, it’s the climax of the story, we had to do it full-strength. We didn’t want to water it down."

ED LIU: "Superman is celebrating his 75th anniversary next year. Taking him out of the context of the Dark Knight for a minute, how much of a challenge is it to you to keep that character relevant? Because all I hear from people is, 'Oh, he’s boring, he’s a god among people…'"

BRUCE TIMM: "It’s a bit of a challenge. Superman can go wrong in a lot of ways. There is something really specific and iconic about Superman as the super boy scout. The trick is, 'How do we make that relevant, how do we make that interesting?' There’s a lot of ways to make that interesting, and there’s lots of bad ways. One way to do that is to make him un-Superman-like. Something happens to make him lose it and he becomes a vengeful killer or something. That’s an easy-out, and they’ve done that, too. It’s a hard thing to describe. The minute you push him too far outside his Superman zone, he’s not Superman any more. So you have to be very careful to walk that line.
On the other end of the paradigm, you’ve got some of those works that have totally super-embraced the idea that Superman is the God-like, Jesus-like, King-Arthur-like figure of pure goodness. That was Grant Morrison’s remit on All-Star Superman, and I think he pulled it off brilliantly. But that’s not easy to do. So there’s no easy answer for that."

ED LIU: "For the art direction, what were you inspired by?"

BRUCE TIMM: "Visually, on this one, we just referred to the comic. We had copies of the graphic novel all over the place, and whenever we were in any doubt what something should look like, whether it was a wrench or a vehicle or a building, it was just like, 'Well, what does it look like in the comic?' Sometimes we’d open it up and look and say, 'Well, we don’t want it to look like that, but we want it to look kind of like that.' So it was always our visual reference."

ED LIU: "Speaking of art direction, it felt a lot of it was mixing your art style with Miller’s. It was almost as much of you as Frank Miller. Or that might just be because there’s a lot of Frank in you."

BRUCE TIMM: "No, I think probably what you’re responding to is that the style we created on Batman: The Animated Series (1992-1998) 20 years ago has kind of become the default superhero style for all the animation that’s currently being done out of Korea, so a Marvel show or a DC show, whether it’s Young Justice (2010-2012) or Fantastic Four (2006-2010) or The Avengers: Earth’s Mightiest Heroes (2010-2012), they all have a little bit of the Batman: The Animated Series DNA in them now, because that’s how all the animators out in Korea do all the work…"

ED LIU: "So now, even if they’re based on Frank Miller, you get infused automatically."

BRUCE TIMM: "Yeah. I wish I could take that out (Laughs). I wish I could just take the Bruce Timm DNA out of that. But it’s just kind of there. Like I said, if that’s what you’re seeing, it was definitely not a conscious thought. I try to keep my style completely out of the direct-to-videos, completely. I don’t want this stuff to look like my stuff when we’re doing them."

ED LIU: "This film deals with the last days of Batman, we just had the film (The Dark Knight Rises) come out over the summer by Chris Nolan, and you did Batman Beyond. Why do you think the Batman audiences has such fascination to find out the last battle of Batman?"

BRUCE TIMM: "You know, I don’t know. It’s not just Batman, I think that it applies to a lot of different characters, like Captain Kirk (Star Trek: Generations (1994)). What’s Captain Kirk’s last battle? If he died, what would it be like? Sometimes it’s satisfying, sometimes it isn’t. I won’t say (Laughs). I think it’s just one of those perennial questions, like, 'If this guy and this guy fought, who would win?'"

ED LIU: "Has Frank Miller reacted?"

BRUCE TIMM: "Not that I’ve heard from. I have not heard from Frank, so I don’t know. Hopefully he likes it."

ED LIU: "Did you have any concerns about the story’s time-frame, the Reagan era, being used nowadays?"

BRUCE TIMM: "There was some discussion about that. We thought, 'Should we update all the references? Should we make Reagan someone else?' We decided to stay truthful to the time period of the book, and not only that, but Reagan specifically was such a big iconic part of the comic. Whether people know or not, who Reagan is any more…Which is kind of a scary thought…Or if they appreciate the time period, it just kind of has to be."

ED LIU: "The comics on the spinner racks in the store, most of them are from that period, I think. I saw Swamp Thing and Watchmen."

BRUCE TIMM: "Well, you know, we were at least cagey about it. We didn’t say exactly what year Dark Knight took place in."

ED LIU: "How do the themes reverberate in this contemporary time? Would they still be relevant?"

BRUCE TIMM: "Oh, I think the themes are universal. The idea of the right-wing vs. the left, and civil rights vs. police states, that stuff is always relevant."

ED LIU: "I though the fight scenes in Dark Knight, especially Part 1, I thought you guys really pushed that. Was that part of staying true to Frank Miller, and having to work that angle?"

BRUCE TIMM: "Well, that’s the thing that always happens is in a comic. The big fight between Batman and the Mutant Leader takes place on, like, two pages of art. It seems like it’s this big epic fight, and when you really look at it, it’s something like 15 panels. And yet, that’s just the difference between comic book language and film language. That’s appropriate for the comic. That scene felt like a big, epic fight. That scene was satisfying and conclusive in the comic. In the movie, if we literally stuck to only those panels that were in the comic, the fight would be over in about 20 seconds, so we needed to expand it and fill-in-the-blanks, basically. Fortunately, Jay Oliva is one of the best action directors and action storyboard artists in the business, and that was his baby."

ED LIU: "You’ve been in a supervising position a lot lately. If you went back to directing, is there anyone that you haven’t gotten a chance to that you haven’t yet…"

BRUCE TIMM: "There’s tons. Too many."

ED LIU: "But is there anyone specifically?"

BRUCE TIMM: "No, I couldn’t give you a sound bite. I can’t tell you, 'I’m going to do…the Inferior Five. That’s my dream job.'"

ED LIU: "That’s the sound bite right there! How was it working with the different voice talent this time around?"

BRUCE TIMM: "It was great. Just…this is when I get my inner geek on. On one hand, I wanted to be really, really professional when I met Peter Weller: 'Hi, I’m Bruce Timm, I’m the producer. OH MY GOD, I LOVE ROBOCOP AND BUCKAROO BANZAI!' (Laughs). But it was a super-thrill. Seriously, RoboCop and Buckaroo Banzai were two of my favorite sci-fi movies back in the day (the '80s). And he was both of them, so that was awesome. Beyond just the geekiness of it, he’s perfect for it. He’s the perfect casting for the part. He’s still a young man, but he sounds older than when he was RoboCop (1987) and when he was Buckaroo Banzai (1984). When his name first came up in the casting sessions, my only hesitation was, 'Does he sound deep enough to be Batman?' Andrea had been watching him (as Stan Liddy) on Dexter (2010) and so she sent me a clip and I thought, 'Wow, he’d be awesome! He’d be perfect as Batman.' And he was."

ED LIU: "Back when you did that episode of Batman: The Animated Series ("Legends of the Dark Knight" (1998)), you had Michael Ironside."

BRUCE TIMM: "Michael Ironside was great, too. It’s always fun and difficult to cast Batman."

ED LIU: "The older Batman?"

BRUCE TIMM: "Batman period. As much as I love Kevin Conroy, and I think he is awesome as Batman and he can play Batman at any age, he could have played this one. We just wanted to try something different. The neat thing about Batman is that there are so many different ways to interpret the character. There isn’t just one perfect way, I think. I always say it’s like James Bond. To me, Sean Connery is the best James Bond. He’s perfect, hands down. But, I love Daniel Craig, too, and I love George Lazenby. And all the different Bonds bring something different to it."

ED LIU: "When you achieve the success of something like The Dark Knight Returns, and you’ve been on kind of a roll lately, does the creativity of that achievement keep it fresh for you and exciting for you after all these years?"

BRUCE TIMM: "Well, I don’t think of it in those terms, like that. Honestly, we have to do so many of these things in such quick succession, I wish we had time to sit after we’ve finished one and say, 'Oh, that was wonderful! That was a wonderful movie we made! Aren’t we proud of this movie?' But honestly, that never happens because we’re in the middle of working on 3 other movies at the same time and a TV series. We never get a chance to just sit down and enjoy what we did. The nice thing is when we finish mixing the movie and onlining it and doing the color correction, and then we put it away because we’re doing about other things, and then we have a screening a week or two later, and it’s kind of nice to go, 'Oh, yeah, I forgotten about this movie, and after not working on it and not worrying about the details, I can look at it in fresh eyes.' That’s always a neat thing."

ED LIU: "Jerry Ordway wanted me to ask you if you were a flower, which one would you be?"

BRUCE TIMM: "If I was a flower, which one would I be? (Laughs)."

ED LIU: "I don’t know what that means, but Jerry said, “Ask Bruce that.'"

BRUCE TIMM: "Uh….orchid. I don’t know why."

ANDREA ROMANO: "(Unfolding a sheet of paper) I’ve got my cheat sheet, guys. There’s 33 actors in this piece. It’s awesome. I had to have notes, because I can’t remember 33 actors."

ED LIU: "Did you get to record a lot of The Dark Knight Returns radio style because of the size of the cast?"

ANDREA ROMANO: "Well, you know, there’s no studio that can hold 33 actors at one time. There just aren’t enough mikes or enough room, but I did record the the secondary characters like Rob and Don. Those characters that clearly speak to each other. I think I did one session where it was kind of like tag team recording. We had maybe 15 actors there. I’d record 5, let them go; record 5, let them go; record 5, let them go. As often as I could, I’d put the two actors who had scenes or however many actors together. Batman never worked with Gordon. Robin recorded all by herself. That was always the challenge, making them sound like they’re having a conversation, especially in part 1 where you have that first scene with Gordon and Bruce Wayne in the restaurant having cocktails. I think they it was like 3 weeks between those two actors recording. So the challenge for me is always making sure that the voices sound like they’re in the same room and having a conversation."

ED LIU: "How did you guys decide who you were going to cast?"

ANDREA ROMANO: "We always meet together and start a wish list: who would we like, who’s a good voice for it, who’s appropriate, who’s hot and happening right now, who’s iconic themselves. And Peter Weller, RoboCop…"

ED LIU: "Was he #1?"

ANDREA ROMANO: "I believe he was. And, gosh, he does a good job! He’s so good. He’s got that wonderful texture and he’s such a good actor, and it’s a bit intimidating because he’s a director, too. He’s been directing a lot of Sons of Anarchy, and I saw a couple of House episodes he did, so directing a director is always kind of scary because you don’t want to lose any credibility. You want to make sure you say something that they can actually respond to."

ED LIU: "Since Peter was working solely on his voice and not his physical appearance, did you have to go over with him some of the tricks that you’ve learned, like, 'When you’re Bruce Wayne, you’re a little smoother, but when you’re Batman, you’re a little rougher'?"

ANDREA ROMANO: "It’s not even that so much because that seems to come very naturally to a lot of actors. They kind of get that sense of it. What I have to work with is, 'You’re actually running through this scene, Peter,' so just taking like 'this' isn’t going to work. You’re going to (huffing and puffing) have that energy, and those kind of specifics aren’t maybe not indicated really clearly in the dialogue, but have to be directed to make sure it’s appropriate. The challenge, especially for someone like Peter Weller or Mark Valley, who played Superman for me, is there’s so much fighting in these pieces. These guys are terrific actors, so I never have to worry about that, but teaching them to do, 'Hurrh! Uhh!' — throwing a punch and receiving a punch — sound different. That’s the challenge. Working them through hundreds of those cues to make sure it matches the picture. They were all game for it, but after three hours of doing it, they get tired. They really do, and I understand it. I don’t like to use a library of those sounds because it gets all kind of boring. It’s the same 'oof' every time. So you do every single cue to picture, and there’s thousands of them."

ED LIU: "So many of the animated films these days use named actors for voice-overs and it’s just to get the audience in there. Do you not like to do that sometimes because you’re afraid people will see 'Peter Weller' and not 'Batman'? Is that a danger?"

ANDREA ROMANO: "I want it to be the right voice for the character. It doesn’t matter to me if they’re not a known actor or if they’re a well-known actor. If it’s the right actor, I’m all for it. There’s actually a few little Easter Eggs where RoboCop is referenced in part 2, and so it’s kind of fun for fans to see these things, but I don’t concern myself with that. I know the director, Jay Oliva, made sure to put a couple of those little Easter Eggs in there."

ED LIU: "I thought the casting of the Mutant Leader was awesome."

ANDREA ROMANO: "Thanks! Thank you! Gary Anthony Williams, I’ve worked with on The Boondocks, and he’s a remarkably versatile actor. What’s wonderful about how versatile he is, is that when you watch part 1, maybe the second or third speaking role is a black news anchor. Very thin, with glasses. That’s also Gary Anthony Williams, and he’s the Mutant Leader as well, and they’re as far away voice-wise as you can imagine. You would never know it was the same actor. Such a tribute to his versatility. You needed this kind of authority and this kind of strength, and again I needed someone who could do hours and hours of fight walla, because that last scene in part 1 is so intense. It’s very interesting when you start to work to picture on that. There’s things that I don’t even see that I need the director or Bruce Timm to point out, like, 'Okay, that’s a point where the Mutant Leader’s nails scrape across Batman’s chest,' and I didn’t actually see that, specifically, so it had to be a really good, 'UUhhh!!' really pained sound, as opposed to just an 'uhh!' if he had just been hit, or a glancing blow. Gary is just stunning at that stuff."

ED LIU: "You’ve had actors playing the Joker over and over and over, you’ve had lots of people playing Batman. Was there any character who brought something different, or something you were surprised that they did it?"

ANDREA ROMANO: "The reason why I cast Michael Emerson as the Joker is because I knew he would do that. We all have in our heads what we think the Joker sounds like, whether you were brought up with Mark Hamill’s Joker, or whatever. You kind of have an idea in your mind, and I knew Michael would bring something different and it wouldn’t be the typical voice one would assume the Joker would sound like. What a stunning actor, I absolutely adore his performance! I saw him three or four months after he finished the voice work, and I asked him, 'Did you enjoy the whole process?' and he said it was the hardest work he ever did, which I found fascinating because this man has quite a body of work, but it was such a new, novel thing. When we recorded him, he was here in New York, I was in L.A., and it was the first time that I recorded someone by Skype, because I wanted to watch him and for him to see me, because when you give a direction, if you can do that to an actor, it helps them. And watching him was just fascinating."
http://www.toonzone.net/2012/10/nycc.../#.UMJuvoNZVj0

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On AMC February 8th.

Last edited by theMan-Bat; 12-07-2012 at 08:43 PM.
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