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Old 05-29-2017, 09:23 AM   #626
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Default Re: The Danny Elfman Appreciation Thread

Happy 64th Birthday to Danny Elfman!


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Old 06-01-2017, 09:57 PM   #627
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Default Re: The Danny Elfman Appreciation Thread

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Originally Posted by Elevator Man View Post

Warren Beatty’s Dick Tracy was a movie I watched countless times as a kid.
Nice post. I guess it is time to watch this again. Loved it when it first came out. My friend bought most of the merchandise, a wall full. Big Beatty fan. I had a mixed cassette tape with many of the tracks on it with some John Barry and Williams track as well. I wore that tape thin in the early 90's.


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Old 06-03-2017, 04:42 PM   #628
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Danny Elfman Talks Upcoming “Dark Universe” Work!

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Originally Posted by Universal Monsters Universe
Danny Elfman, one of the most iconic of composers, has created the opening theme for Universal’s “Dark Universe” which debuts with The Mummy. Elfman is no stranger when it comes to creating iconic compositions, just look at Batman, Spider-Man, Hulk, and even 2010’s The Wolfman. Looking to inspire and entertain a new generation of fans with their classic monsters, Donna Langley, Chairman of Universal Pictures said the following:

As we launch Dark Universe with Danny’s provocative theme before The Mummy and collaborate with a brilliant filmmaker like Bill [Condon] to weave the story of a very modern woman [Bride of Frankenstein] in a very classic tale, we feel confident we’re off to a tremendous start.

From his first score on Tim Burton’s Pee-wee’s Big Adventure and his iconic theme for The Simpsons—not to mention his collaborations with filmmakers including Ang Lee, David O. Russell, Sam Raimi, Rob Marshall, Guillermo del Toro, Joss Whedon and Peter Jackson—four-time Academy Award® nominee Danny Elfman’s inimitable compositions have vaulted him into one of the most versatile and accomplished composers in history.

“I grew up on monsters. Monsters were my life, and these iconic Universal monsters were almost like my family. I simply wouldn’t be the same without them. When I got the opportunity to compose a theme for the Dark Universe logo, of course I jumped at it. What could be more fun than connecting to this world that has always been so deeply imbedded in my psyche? I tried to find something that was new but still had some connections with the past—the origins—at least in a subtle way. Something that was looking forward to a creative, fertile, imaginative future that Dark Universe will enter, and at the same time saluting the heritage of the tragic heroes (or anti-heroes) of my childhood. To the Monsters!!!!” – Danny Elfman

To the monsters, indeed! It’s very exciting to have another talented individual as a part of the “Dark Universe” and Danny Elfman will almost certainly ensure that our first proper introduction into the world of gods and monsters is as unforgettable as a Universal Monster film should be!

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Old 06-14-2017, 12:39 PM   #629
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Why Danny Elfman Wants to Make Just $1 for a Score

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Originally Posted by The Hollywood Reporter
Danny Elfman is known for working on larger-than-life characters like Batman and Spider-Man, but now he's going much, much smaller.

With the help of indi.com, Elfman has launched a short film competition in conjunction with the 2017 LA Film Festival. All six movements from Elfman's 2008 "Rabbit and Rogue" ballet are available for filmmakers to use in their short films — with no licensing fees or red tape.

Elfman is giving away his “Rabbit and Rogue” intellectual property, so it's a little ironic that he must license his own music from the studios whenever he performs live.

"The majority of the big studio stuff, my collaborations with Tim [Burton], it’s all owned by them. I would say that I own the rights to maybe five percent of what I've written," says Elfman, who has been spending more time working on low budget films, for which he collects just a $1 fee.

"Every year, I try to do at least one $1 film. On those films, I do own the publishing. Obviously, if they’re only paying me a dollar I gotta get something," he says with a laugh.

For this contest, Elfman has enlisted a number of filmmaking friends to judge, including Paul Haggis, McG, Sam Taylor-Johnson, Gus Van Sant and Suzanne Todd. The contest’s winners will be announced on Thursday, with the winning filmmakers getting to meet with the judges and see their short films screened at the LA Film Festival.

Director McG, who worked with Elfman on 2009's Terminator: Salvation, says he's a lifelong fan.

"Believe me, I'd love to work with Danny on everything I do. We gingers have to stick together, we're in short supply," McG says. "It’s just really difficult to catch him in-between projects, he stays so busy."

The demand for Elfman was not always so high. Before he was established, Elfman and several of his musician friends would spend long days performing on the street for tips. When asked to compare a good day on the street with a not-so-great day, Elfman is blunt.

"When you’re a street musician, it’s real simple. A good day on the street means you come home with a full hat and you eat," says Elfman. "A bad day is when you come home and you’re splitting up loose change between eight people, and you’re not gonna eat."

Despite a lifetime of performing, Elfman never acclimated to the spotlight. Last year at a sold out concert in London, he sang Jack Skeleton's songs from A Nightmare Before Christmas. As he recalls, it was quite the challenge.

"I was dealing with a huge bout of stage fright… I hadn't sung live for almost 18 years. I just found myself froze backstage. I couldn't move my feet and I was due on stage," says Elfman. "Helena Bonham Carter helped give me a little shove, by reminding me to say, “F—k it.” And it was a good thing, because it was amazing night. It was actually one of the most amazing nights I've ever had."

The Rabbit and Rogue contest was produced by Richard Kraft and Laura Engel. You can view the submitted films and learn more information about Elfman's competition by visiting its website.

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Old 06-14-2017, 07:52 PM   #630
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Danny Elfman to Score ‘Justice League’

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Originally Posted by Film Music Reporter
Danny Elfman has taken over scoring duties on the upcoming superhero movie Justice League. Junkie XL aka Tom Holkenborg who co-scored Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice for the DC movie universe was originally scoring the film before director Zack Snyder left the project. Joss Whedon is overseeing additional photography is beginning this week in London. Elfman has previously collaborated with Whedon on Avengers: Age of Ultron. Justice League starring Ben Affleck, Henry Cavill, Gal Gadot, Ezra Miller, Ray Fisher and Jason Momoa will be released in theaters nationwide on November 17 by Warner Bros. Pictures. (The Hollywood Reporter)
Holy crap! Is this real. I guess Whedon is more involved than was let on. As cool as it is that Elfman will be scoring JL. Not looking forward to the movie after the previous misfires from the DCEU (excluding Wonder Woman, which I still haven't seen yet). I was planning on renting JL whenever it came out on dvd and Bluray instead going to theaters. But I don't know now. It's amazing Elfman scored two Batman movies, the theme for 90s The Flash tv show, two Spider-Man movies, Hulk, Hellboy sequel, Avengers sequel and now Justice League. If he stays on board for JL he'd have written music/themes for two versions of Batman and The Flash. Wow! This news feels so surreal.

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Old 06-19-2017, 12:20 PM   #631
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Default Re: The Danny Elfman Appreciation Thread

Batman Returns was released in theaters 25 years ago today. And of course I listened to my La La Land Records Batman Returns (2-CD) Expanded Archival Collection this morning.

Danny Elfman Batman Returns Interview
Spoiler!!! Click to Read!:


Danny Elfman-Batman Returns interview (1992)
Spoiler!!! Click to Read!:


25 years later Elfman will return to DC/WB to score Justice League. I still can't believe it.

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Old 06-20-2017, 01:34 AM   #632
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The Girl On The Train is based on the 2015 popular best selling novel by Paula Hawkins of the same name. It centers around Rachel (played by Emily Blunt), who’s an unemployed alcoholic still coping with her divorce from two years ago. She spends her alimony money taking the commute and spending most her time at bars. While on the train Rachel fantasizes about the perfect marriage and lifestyle because she believes hers ended due to her drinking problem. While taking the train from home and back, Rachel becomes fixated on a couple named Scott (played by Luke Evans) and Megan Hipwell (played by Haley Bennett) who seem to be happy and very much in love at least on the surface. Rachel imagines the kind of happy life the couple share. Coincidentally the Hipwells live across the street from Rachel and her ex husband Tom’s (played by Justin Theroux) house. Tom still lives there but with his 2nd wife Anna (played by Rebecca Ferguson) and first child. Tom and Anna are basically living the kind of life Rachel still yearns for as well. Rachel witnesses something suspicious happen with one of the Hipwells, which tarnishes her fantasy of the couple. Abduction and murder unfolds. Forcing Rachel to investigate and believing she’s a possible suspect..

The Girl On The Train is a psychological mystery thriller but beneath the surface it’s a drama that examines three broken women (Rachel, Megan, and Anna). Rachel, after her divorce feels empty and a lack of purpose. So she fantasizes and projects her appetite for a perfect life and marriage on a another couple. While also wasting her life away through the bottle. Megan puts on a facade by pretending to be happy about her marriage and life with Scott, but actually feels empty inside as well. She’s actually haunted by a dark secret past she‘s kept from everyone. This secret has made Megan very promiscuous, which even has her seeking therapy. Anna has (and somewhat stole from Rachel) the perfect life with Tom. She seems happily married, but deep down feels empty inside and even trapped. As a result Anna has become an unemployed housewife and a stay at home mom 24/7. The movie explores the impact of lusting for the perfect lifestyle/marriage of three women. As they come to realize it’s not all it’s cracked up to be. We also get to see how different these couples are from Rachel’s perspective of them.

Critics panned the film. I don’t know if it had anything to do with how it was adapted from the book or not. I think critics (not to mention people that haven’t read either book) were expecting another Gone Girl, which I remember the trailers/TV spots of The Girl On The Train being promoted as. I’ve heard people criticize/praise Elfman’s score for being similar to Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross’ Gone Girl, which I’ll give my opinion on that matter shortly. Besides both films being a mystery with unreliable narrators neither are anything alike. So that’s probably one of the reasons why the film suffered critically because the marketing team's poor decision to promote it as the next Gone Girl. However, I was glad the movie wasn’t a knock offGone Girl but it’s own thing.

Despite the negative reviews I didn’t think The Girl On The Train was a bad movie at all. In fact I enjoyed the film and performances a lot more than others did. I’ve never read the book it was based on. So I can’t compare how it holds up to the novel. However, I understand the complaints about the movie manipulating and misdirecting the audience, but since the narrative is being told through mostly Rachel’s perspective (an unreliable narrator) it made sense. Rachel tends to blackout when she’s drunk and has a difficult time piecing together her memories after sobering up, which also makes her easily manipulated. I do believe the coincidences in the plot and between characters feel a bit contrived e.g. the Hipwells living across the street from Rachel’s old house, which Tom and Anna happen to be the residents of, as well Tom and Anna’s nanny is none other than Megan, etc. On the positive side Blunt, Ferguson, and Bennett each gave compelling performances. I felt empathy for each of them. Blunt in particular plays a very convincing raging alcoholic. So if anything check out the film for the performances of the three leading ladies.

Though Elfman was a fitting choice for this kind of movie I was somewhat surprised when he signed on as the composer. Director Tate Taylor has collaborated with Thomas Newman on his previous two projects (The Help and Get On Up). So based on that I figured Newman would be the likely choice for composer. Regardless I’m sure Newman would’ve came up with an intriguing and compelling score but I’m glad Taylor gave Elfman the opportunity to score a picture like this. The movie is basically Rear Window on the train from the perspective of an alcoholic. So I was expecting a traditional symphonic score with some added synthesizers and nods to Bernard Herrmann, but Elfman’s score is mostly electronic with a small orchestra centered around the string section (violins, violas, cello, bass, and harp), and piano. It’s a very ambient, experimental and textural score. Taylor pushing Elfman into that direction shouldn’t have came as a surprise to me because I remember Newman’s score for Get On Up being very ambient, low key and mostly electronic. This approach allowed Elfman to branch out of his comfort zone. Aside from Wisdom, Planet Of The Apes (2001), and The Kingdom it’s rare for Elfman scores to be electronic driven, but it allowed him to come up with a dissonant and introspective score that examines the broken alcoholic narrator that is Rachel.

There have been complaints that Elfman’s score consists of mostly droning and sound design. As well as expressing how much the score reminded them of Gone Girl and Trent Reznor’s other scores. I don’t own any of Reznor’s scores, but based off what I noticed of his score for Gone Girl (in the film). And besides the fact that both scores utilize electronics to portray the bleakness and cruelty of the characters, story, and atmosphere. I don’t hear much similarities with either score. Plus I feel there’s a lot more nuance and depth with Elfman’s score. People mistake Elfman’s score of being mostly droning sound design and sonic wallpaper. However, Elfman came up with plenty of motifs for Rachel that he could interweave and deconstruct throughout the score, which I‘ll get into shortly. In comparison to Reznor and Ross I believe Elfman took a more skillful approach with the synthesizers and such for The Girl On The Train, imo.

For some reason the score didn’t resonate with me in the movie as much as it did for me on the album. I was able to latch onto the motifs presented throughout the score. It was interesting exploring different variations of the motifs presented. And because of how textural and layered the score is I believe it’s one of those scores where the listener will benefit from multiple listens. Based off my experience depending on how attentive listeners are they’ll discover variations and distortions of recurring motifs that they didn’t prior. Maybe even discover a hidden motif(s) that they didn’t on a previous listen.

The main motif of the score revolves around Rachel. It’s mostly piano driven and is sometimes overlaid with synthesizers. It’s introduced in “Riding The Train”, which opens the album. The track comprises of piano, synthesizers, and electric guitar, which gives it a very melancholic and empty feel. The cue establishes how pathetic and deluded Rachel’s become. Instead of getting a job she spends her alimony money taking the commute and getting intoxicated because it’s the only way she can cope with her divorce, which is ironically what she believes ruined her marriage in first place. As well as projecting her own fantasy on a married couple she’s constantly spying on on a daily basis, while taking the train. Rachel’s motif can be heard throughout the score particularly near the end of “Something’s Not Right”, “All *****ed Up”, “The Perfect Couple/Password”, “You’re Always Wasted”, “Memory” at the end of “Resolution”, and “The Girl On The Train - Main Titles”, which is actually the film’s end titles. “The Girl On The Train - Main Titles” is the only cue (one of the few calm cues on the album for that matter) that took a more pleasant and optimistic approach with Rachel‘s motif. By the end of the film Rachel has found peace and isn’t lusting for the perfect life or marriage, spying on married couples, being envious of her ex-husband’s second wife, or coping with her divorce any longer. She’s more confident and isn’t the same damaged woman she was at the beginning of the movie. Rachel doesn’t feel that she lacks purpose anymore. The vocals humming Rachel’s motif gives her a bittersweet ending, which hints that a new redemptive stage/journey is out there for her to explore. My only complaint about “The Girl On The Train - Main Titles” is that it’s a very short cue which could‘ve benefited being 3-5 minutes long, imo. Since it’s the only peaceful and pleasant version of Rachel’s motif.

Elfman came up with another motif for Rachel that depicts whenever she’s intoxicated or piecing together her memories from her blackouts, which is a side effect of her drinking. Rachel’s secondary/intoxicated motif characterizes her being a raging alcoholic. The motif, which consists of two parts that play counterpoint to one another, is very haunting, deranged, and hypnotic. The first part is a 4 note rhythmic beat, which is somewhat reminiscent of the 4 notes that open Elfman’s “Silver Linings Titles” from Silver Linings Playbook. In some cues the four notes is either played on strings or synthesizers. The 2nd part is comprised of six notes. The first 5 notes is played on what sounds like a piano, while the sixth note (or last note) is played on strings. Sometimes the sixth note alternates between synthesizer, strings, and electric guitar. Certain points in the score Elfman uses only the four note portion of the motif for example in “Wasted“. As well as only the 6 note portion during “Missing Time”, which becomes more fragmented. There’s fragmented variations of the intoxicated Rachel motif in “Deviled Eggs”. Sometimes the six note portion gets shortened to 3 notes, e.g . “Uncertainty”, “I’m Sorry”, and in the middle of “Really Creepy”. Elfman really dissects the intoxicated motif in many interesting directions throughout the score, which seem to take place during crucial points in the movie.

A third drone-y motif is introduced in “Stolen”, which is comprised of 3 notes on synthesizer. I’m not sure what it represents either Rachel being suspicious of a character, Rachel possibly being a suspect, etc. It’s a very disturbing, mysterious, and suspicious motif. It recurs in a couple of tracks e.g. “Wasted”, “Deviled Eggs”, “I’m Sorry”, and “Really Creepy”.

A more foreboding motif is introduced in “Rachel”. Again I can’t put my finger on what or who it represents, but it’s mostly a dour piano driven cue. The motif only recurs in two cues “Rachel” and during most of “Really Creepy”. It’s very much in the vein with some of Elfman’s more solemn material for The Next Three Days.

Megan is briefly given a motif, which can be heard in two cues (“Megan” and “Touch Myself”). “Megan” is a very serene cue (one of the few on the album ) with a hint of melancholy. Even though it’s a mellow cue, there’s something sorrowful about it, imo. “Megan” also establishes Megan’s façade of pretending to be a happy normal housewife fitting in but in all actuality is really broken inside due to a dark secret that’s constantly haunting and consuming her mentally. There’s a fragmented morbidly sultry variation of her motif that can be heard in “Touch Myself”, which explores Megan’s promiscuity.

Elfman cleverly interweaves and interlocks motifs by having certain ones lurking in the background while others are presented in the forefront e.g “I‘m Sorry“ (contains the 3 note suspicious drone-y motif, the intoxicated Rachel motif (with the shortened to 3 notes 2nd part) , and Rachel’s main motif) “Memory” (contains Rachel’s main motif, intoxicated Rachel motif (in full), brief subtle appearance of the 3 note suspicious drone-y motif) “Really Creepy (contains the foreboding motif from “Rachel”, the 3 note suspicious drone-y motif, the second part of intoxicated Rachel Motif (shortened to 3 notes)). It’s a clever way for the music to investigate Rachel’s (just as she does from her blackouts) blurred memories by cohesively connecting the recurring motifs.

Highlights of the score for me were “Riding The Train”, “Something’s Not Right”, “Megan”, “Rachel”, “3 Women”, “All *****ed Up!” (cue is actually far from it), “Wasted”, “Uncertainty”, “The Perfect Couple/Password”, “I’m Sorry”, “Memory”, “Really Creepy”, “Just Desserts”, “Self Defense” (vocals adds an ethereal feel), “Resolution” (the piano brings a more hopeful feel, which depicts Rachel as being somewhat empowered and less broken by the end of the movie), “The Girl On The Train - Main Titles”.

In conclusion, The Girl On The Train is a complex, atmospheric, and ambient score that examines the mind of an emotionally and mentally damaged alcoholic. Due to how dense and textural the score is listeners should listen to it more than once. If so you’ll be rewarded by discovering motifs and ideas that you may not have noticed before. It’ll possibly change your opinion about the score and add an extra layer to it. Don’t expect a traditional orchestral Elfman score. If you dislike electronic heavy scores then this might not be for you. The synthesizers are at times very harsh and nasty but it also depicts how cruel, depressing, and broken some of the characters devolve into in the movie. There aren’t much pleasant moments to balance out all the darkness featured in the score. What little there is it’s very brief. Also it might negatively affect those who haven’t seen the movie and need context while listening to the score. The 52 minute runtime also felt smooth. The album didn’t drag or feel rushed, imo. This is a solid Elfman score overall. It had me invested from start to finish. Elfman took a rather skillful and intelligent approach with the synthesizers and string instruments. I don’t think the score would be as effective, nuanced or clever if Trent Reznor and the like had scored it. The Girl On The Train is up there with some of Elfman’s most intriguing scores, imo. Recommended to fans of Elfman’s more subdued and experimental scores, because even some of his hard core fans might have a hard time warming up to this score.


Last edited by Elevator Man; 06-20-2017 at 01:41 AM.
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Old 06-22-2017, 12:17 AM   #633
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Default Re: The Danny Elfman Appreciation Thread

Rabbit & Rogue Panel LAFF 2017 Ft. Danny Elfman
Spoiler!!! Click to Read!:

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Old 06-26-2017, 06:51 PM   #634
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Danny Elfman to Return for ‘Fifty Shades Freed’

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Originally Posted by Film Music Reporter
Danny Elfman will be returning as the composer for the upcoming sequel Fifty Shades Freed. The film is directed by James Foley (Glengarry Glenn Ross, Confidence) who also helmed this year’s Fifty Shades Darker and stars Dakota Johnson, Jamie Dornan, Arielle Kebbel, Kim Basinger, Brant Daugherty and Luke Grimes. The movie continues the story from 2015’s Fifty Shades of Grey and this year’s Fifty Shades Darker, which Elfman also scored. Niall Leonard has written the screenplay for the final installment in the trilogy based on E.L. James’ bestselling novel. Michael De Luca & Dana Brunetti (The Social Network, Captain Phillips, 21) are producing the project with James. Fifty Shades Darker is set to be released on February 9, 2018 by Universal Pictures.

Elfman’s upcoming projects also include Justice League. He also scored the period drama Tulip Fever, which is scheduled to be released in U.S. theaters this August.

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Old 07-02-2017, 02:34 PM   #635
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Default Re: The Danny Elfman Appreciation Thread

The original Men In Black was released in theaters 20 years ago today. The quirky score, which also has a hip and stylish main theme, lead to Elfman's first oscar nomination.

M.I.B. Main Theme
Spoiler!!! Click to Read!:


The Suit
Spoiler!!! Click to Read!:


K Reminisces
Spoiler!!! Click to Read!:


Finale
Spoiler!!! Click to Read!:


M.I.B. Closing Theme
Spoiler!!! Click to Read!:

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Old 07-03-2017, 11:26 AM   #636
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Default Re: The Danny Elfman Appreciation Thread

Men In Black II was released in theaters 15 years ago today. Definitely the wildest of three MIB scores.

Worm Lounge #1 (Worms In Black)
Spoiler!!! Click to Read!:


Titles
Spoiler!!! Click to Read!:


Heart Thump
Spoiler!!! Click to Read!:


The Light
Spoiler!!! Click to Read!:


Worm Lounge #2
Spoiler!!! Click to Read!:

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