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Old 04-10-2018, 02:22 PM   #726
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‘Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot’ Soundtrack Details

Quote:
Originally Posted by Film Music Reporter
Sony Classical will release a soundtrack album for Gus Van Sant’s drama Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot. The album features the film’s original music composed by Danny Elfman (Batman, Spider-Man, Alice in Wonderland, The Nightmare Before Christmas) who previously collaborated with the director on numerous projects including Good Will Hunting and Milk. Also included is John Callahan’s song Texas When You Go, as well as a track by Alex Somers (Captain Fantastic, Aloha) who composed additional music for the movie. The soundtrack is set to be released on July 6, 2018. Check back on this page for the cover art and pre-order link. Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot is written and directed by Van Sant and stars Joaquin Phoenix, Jonah Hill, Rooney Mara, Jack Black. The movie tells the story of quadriplegic cartoonist John Callahan who became paralyzed following a car accident at the age of 21 and turned to art as a form of therapy. The drama premiered at this year’s Sundance Film Festival and will be released in theaters on July 13 by Amazon Studios. Visit the official movie website for updates.

Here’s the album track list:

1. Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot (Main Title)
2. 1st Drink
3. Phone Call
4. Car Crash
5. Stuck in the Tracks
6. Out of Reach
7. The Kids, Pt. 1
8. Mother’s Name
9. The Liquor Store
10. Annu
11. The Hospital Bed – Alex Somers
12. Steps
13. Drawing Montage
14. Gymnasts
15. Showing Off
16. Donnie is Sick
17. John’s Speech
18. Weepy Donuts
19. The Kids, Pt. 2
20. Good News
21. 12th Step
22. Texas When You Go – John Callahan
23. Auntie Tia – Danny and the Hillbilly Boyz

Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far On Foot - Teaser Trailer | Amazon Studios
Spoiler!!! Click to Read!:


Last edited by Elevator Man; 05-27-2018 at 10:09 PM. Reason: Add album art.
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Old 04-16-2018, 10:34 PM   #727
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Scrooged Going OOP!!!
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Originally Posted by La La Land Records
GET SCROOGED BEFORE IT SELLS OUT!

We are down to the final 30 units on Danny Elfman's Holiday classic SCROOGED!

Only $15.98!

http://lalalandrecords.com/Site/Scrooged.html

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Old 04-25-2018, 03:59 PM   #728
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Errol Morris' Standard Operating Procedure, which is an obscure 2008 documentary that explores the 2003 Abu Ghraib prison scandal. The documentary was released in a limited amount of theaters a decade ago today. Elfman's underrated score is at times riveting, contemplative, mysterious, somber, and unsettling.

S.O.P Theme #1 Standard Operating Procedure
Spoiler!!! Click to Read!:


The Infamous Pyramid
Spoiler!!! Click to Read!:


Photos
Spoiler!!! Click to Read!:


The Shooter
Spoiler!!! Click to Read!:


Dogs
Spoiler!!! Click to Read!:


Standard Operating Procedure - Gilligan (Danny Elfman)
Spoiler!!! Click to Read!:


Elfman at the Standard Operating Procedure premiere back in 2008.



Last edited by Elevator Man; 06-27-2018 at 11:42 PM.
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Old 05-13-2018, 10:01 PM   #729
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Oz The Great And Powerful LOW QUANTITY ALERT! Less than 275 remaining!

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Old 05-21-2018, 02:38 PM   #730
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Interview: Bear McCreary Showers Love on Oingo Boingo on the Eve of Danny Elfman’s Birthday

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Originally Posted by Dread Central
Fans of today’s best horror and sci-fi know the name Bear McCreary; the composer has built up an enviable resume working on popular shows like The Walking Dead and Battlestar Galactica and recent films like The Cloverfield Paradox and Happy Death Day.

Although he rarely gives interviews, we were able to snag Bear for a sit-down when he heard our main topic of conversation would be his idol, Danny Elfman (who turns 65 later this month). What transpired was more than can be absorbed in a single read, so we’ll be bringing you our conversation with Bear in 2 parts.

Read about Bear’s connections to the post-farewell reincarnation of Oingo Boingo and the roots of his appreciation for the music of Danny Elfman below. Come back next week to hear him weigh in on The Walking Dead’s dwindling viewership.

Dread Central: Let’s talk about our mutual love for Danny Elfman since his birthday is coming up on May 29th.

Bear McCreary: Where do you want to start?

DC: Are you an Oingo Boingo fan?

BM: [Long pause] Yes. That’s the short answer.

DC: I read your blog post where you said at age 10, you were watching a movie and as soon as you heard the score, you immediately knew it was done by Danny Elfman even before his name came up in the credits.

BM: That was the first time my mom looked at me and thought, “Who is this kid?”

DC: Did you already know Danny Elfman from Oingo Boingo or was your first introduction to him through movies?

BM: I found out about Danny through films; when I was a kid all I listened to were film scores. From age 5 until about age 15, I didn’t listen to pop music—at all. It was only when I found out that my favorite film composer had a rock band that I thought I would check them out. For a lot of people, Danny Elfman is their gateway from popular music to film music. For me it was the other way around: Through Danny Elfman’s film music, I found out about popular music. Once I got into Oingo Boingo, I started listening to Pink Floyd and Guns n Roses and Rage Against the Machine and Queen. I was like, “Oh wow! Popular music has a lot of great stuff!”. It all started with my discovery of Oingo Boingo (who I adore) which came from my appreciation of Danny’s film music.

DC: That’s exactly right. I’m from Southern California and Oingo Boingo were local legends in the 1980s, and it was my love of Oingo Boingo that led to my love of Danny Elfman’s film music. Danny Elfman has such a unique sound, it wasn’t long before I could instantly identify his film music too. What’s your favorite Oingo Boingo album?

BM: Man, Josh! That’s a tough one!

DC: I know!

BM: I don’t know that I can pick. Let me give you a few: What I always appreciate about Danny and Oingo Boingo is the way they explore new frontiers and new sounds. So there’s a number of gear-shifts in their output where we go from one gear to another, and those tend to be the records I really like. First of all, you have to start with Only a Lad which is where they’re transitioning from The Mystic Knights of the Oingo Boingo and The Forbidden Zone, from being a weird performance art troupe in Venice Beach to being an actual rock band. There’s a lot in that record that’s pulled over from that more theatrical era but being shoved into this New Wave mentality.

I love Nothing to Fear, I love Good for Your Soul. Dead Man’s Party is another gear-shift for the band where they’re starting to explore some new sounds. For me, if I had to pick a favorite, I really might go with Dark at the End of the Tunnel or their final album, Boingo. This is probably because I got my first introduction to Danny Elfman through his film music, and those last two records, you could tell his film music was really influencing Oingo Boingo and not the other way around. I think there’s a maturity and sophistication and a narrative musicality in those two records that, for me, is super appealing.

It almost feels sacrilegious to say Dark at the End of the Tunnel is a better record than Good for Your Soul—I’m not saying that. I’m saying that for me personally, those last two Oingo Boingo records mean the most to me.

DC: I love your reverence for the band. I had no idea you were a true Oingo Boingo expert.

BM: Do you want me to blow your mind?

DC: Um—of course!

BM: Here’s something you don’t know about me: In 2005, Johnny “Vatos” Hernandez put the vast majority of Oingo Boingo together to do a concert. It was John Avila, Steve Bartek, Sluggo [Sam Phipps], Doug Lacy, and I was the MD; I did all the arrangements, I played keys. My brother [Brendan] sang lead vocals and so we reunited Oingo Boingo under the Johnny Vatos banner, and we did shows for 3 or 4 years in that configuration. We had strings and backing vocalists; my wife Raya [Yarbrough] was in there. And that ensemble is continuing today as The Johnny Vatos Oingo Boingo Dance Party. My brother is still the lead singer and they’re still playing a lot of my arrangements. And I worked with the Oingo Boingo guys when they played in Battlestar Galactica. They play on a lot of my film scores. Steve Bartek was a groomsman at my wedding. I’ve known these guys since I moved to LA; they’re my family.

DC: Mind. ****ing. Blown. I was excited to interview you from the get-go, but I had no idea I’d be talking to a bona fide member of Oingo Boingo! This stuff isn’t on your Wikipedia page, man!

BM: Not only were Oingo Boingo a huge part of my life growing up, they are my family. I don’t know Danny that well, but Steve and Johnny and John and Sam and Doug: These are some of the closest people in my life and I talk to them all the time.

DC: Amazing.

BM: I’m a fan for sure, and all those guys influenced me immensely. In this post-1995 era, the band and associated musicians have all gone on to do their own things, but my brother and my wife and I have been able to be part of that post-farewell afterlife of Oingo Boingo. Steve Bartek told me that the first time he and Vatos and Avila played together since the last Oingo Boingo concert was when I reunited them to score a short film. I had met them all and was like, [nervous voice] “Will you play on my student film score?” They said “Sure” and from there, they did a few more scores on student films. So when Battlestar Galactica came up, it was my first job and I needed a guitar player. So I brought in Steve and brought in John and Johnny. And when I played the music of Battlestar Galactic in concert, Bartek, Vatos, and Avila all played on stage with me. So I’ve been on stage with these guys doing Oingo Boingo music and my own music.

DC: You said you were going to blow my mind and you did. Thank you!

BM: You’re welcome. That’s why when you asked, “Are you a fan of Oingo Boingo?” I had a feeling this would go well; I was like, “Where do I begin?”

DC: With Danny Elfman’s birthday coming up, I think this discussion about Oingo Boingo and the band’s legacy will be really interesting for our readers.

BM: It’s interesting though because, despite the fact that I know the rest of the band very well, I don’t know Danny that well. I’ve met him a couple of times and he’s a sweet guy. But to me, Danny Elfman is probably a lot like what he is to you. He’s this mythic figure; he is the person who created all this music that I adore. And, I think for the purpose of honoring him, as opposed to talking about all this **** I’ve done with his friends, it’s important to know that Danny inspires me. Even to this day, when I’m writing music and I’m thinking about the music I loved.

Like, when I was doing The Cloverfield Paradox, I thought, “What kind of music would I have wanted to hear at age 15? What would have made me go, ‘Oh my God, that was amazing!’” And that’s what I want to write. And I think about Danny at these time, what he meant to me and still means to me and his inventiveness. I don’t think it can be overstated what a profound creative impact he’s had on me. I’d like to think I’m taking that energy and paying it forward.

DC: Hopefully he’ll read this and appreciate your appreciation.

BM: That would be nice, but at the same time, he’s inspired millions of people. I don’t think there’s anything special about me in that regard. He’s created such an incredible body of work spanning all these genres; and it’s like you said, you always recognize his sound. To me, that’s the ultimate sign of musical genius. Maybe more than just genius; it really gets into craftsmanship. This is a guy who’s worked really hard. And that makes me admire him more. There are lots of people in life who are really talented and can get by on talent alone, but Danny Elfman is talented and he works his ass off. Every few years he’s reinventing himself and trying something new. He strikes me as the kind person who isn’t satisfied doing things he’s already wildly successful at because he wants to do something challenging, you know what I mean?

I admire that. In many ways, I’ve modeled my career in that way. When I really established myself in television, especially science fiction television, that became a world that was available to me. And I think, taking a cue from Danny Elfman, I thought, “Okay, what else is there for me out there?” Because I want to challenge myself. I want to do something I’m not known for; I want to do something that people don’t associate with my name. Like when Good Will Hunting came out, that came out of nowhere; and in hindsight, the same can be said about the first Mission Impossible movie. These were scores that you would not think, at that time, would be something Danny Elfman would be doing. And he did. He redefined himself. And that’s the artist I want to be. I’d also throw in Jerry Goldsmith and Elmer Bernstein as examples of musicians who would constantly strive to do new things.

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Old 05-26-2018, 07:48 PM   #731
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La La Land/MV Questions thread

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Originally Posted by SBD
Forgiveness if this was already asked, but Elfman's BEETLEJUICE. Is there a shot in Hell?
Quote:
Originally Posted by La La Land Records
Certainly but things at wb are at a stand still for the rest of 2018. They are working on an internal project that is monopolizing most of their time (taking away from doing historical releases for the the time being)...although, we do have some projects hopefully coming by year's end from them.

MV

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Old 05-28-2018, 02:11 PM   #732
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Interview: Bear McCreary Talks Danny Elfman’s Influence

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dread Central
Last week, we began our conversation with lauded composer Bear McCreary, known for his work on shows like Battlestar Galactica and The Walking Dead, along with recent films The Cloverfield Paradox and Happy Death Day.

Since Danny Elfman has been a constant source of influence and inspiration for Bear, and since the composer’s birthday is coming up on May 29th, he’s been a reoccurring theme throughout our conversation.

Dread Central: We’ve talked about how Danny Elfman’s sound is instantly recognizable; it’s circus-like, it’s jaunty, it’s whimsical. There’s also a Bear McCreary sound; by comparison, it’s atmospheric, it’s moody, it’s surreal. How would you describe the Bear McCreary sound, and what elements can listeners tune into in order to recognize your work without even seeing your name?

Bear McCreary: That’s a fascinating question, and I’ve got to say, Josh: I’m utterly unqualified to answer. You’re more qualified than I am because I’m inside my brain. Even when I’m trying to reinvent myself, even when I’m trying to not sound like myself, I am myself! I make my version of whatever I’m doing. So I don’t know. I will say, I certainly hope that there’s no specific musical thing I can point to and say, “Well, you know, I always use the C minor chord in 4×4…” you know what I mean? I’m striving to not be known for using a specific bag of tricks. But I think that what I strive to do, and what Danny Elfman very frequently does, is write music with personality. That is a word that has stuck with me for just about 20 years now.

The first time I heard that word pertaining to music was when I was working with Elmer Bernstein, one of my other heroes; I was a protégé of his for a few years. When I was just out of high school, I was sitting in on his film scoring class at USC (which I wasn’t even allowed to attend). But I did the assignment, which was to score a scene from Sudden Fear, one of the films Elmer scored back in, I think it was 1952. He gave it to the class and said, “Okay everybody, write a cue.”

So I wrote this cue and I remember thinking vividly, “This feels like a Danny Elfman cue”. It had big tribal drums and low woodwinds. It reminded me of Nightbreed (one of my favorite Danny Elfman scores). And, of course, looking back on it, it was way too big and aggressive. It was steamrolling over this black and white scene from the 1950s. But Elmer smiled and he said, “This cue has a lot of personality.”

And I remember realizing I wasn’t thinking about it that way. I was just trying to make the most awesome thing I could. And as I’ve gotten into this business, as I’ve written music and listened to music that’s out there I’ve realized: Music with personality is consistently the music I enjoy; it’s the music that stands out to me. And I really picked that up from Danny Elfman. His music has so much personality we immediately identify it with him. But even his scores that don’t immediately jump out as being a Danny Elfman score still have personality and that’s an incredibly valuable thing.

DC: If you’ve still got a couple minutes, we’d love to hear about what you’re working on next.

BM: I’m very excited about God of War, for Sony PlayStation. I don’t do video games very often but this one is just epic and I think it’s going to be fantastic. And I have a number of horror and science fiction films around the corner, but it’s a little early to say what they are just yet. There’s a lot of cool stuff coming up in the next year, so I’d just say stay tuned!

And please include, from me, a hearty Happy Birthday to Danny Elfman and thanks for all the years of inspiration.

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Old 05-28-2018, 02:25 PM   #733
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Danny Elfman's Most Successful Compositions

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Originally Posted by Pucks and Recreation
Composition connoisseur Danny Elfman has a unifying power over TV and film consumers. Whether they notice it or not, viewers with opposing tastes have each heard his work complement their beloved program or film.

One could be a strict DC devotee or a Marvel-only movie buff. Both bases have seen their favorite superhero swashbuckle to the tune (literally) of Elfman’s brainchild.

The theme for The Simpsons can elicit laughter over sheer anticipation. Elfman was behind that as much as he has driven moving Oscar-nominated drama scores.

For the bulk of their respective careers, he has been Tim Burton’s musical batterymate. To that point, he won his second Primetime Emmy in 2016 for a Lincoln Center special titled “Danny Elfman’s Music from the Films of Tim Burton.” Yet his discography is almost equally rife with non-Burton projects.

One of few household names in his vocation, Elfman has at least two composer credits still to come. He will turn 65 this Tuesday, but shows no intention of slowing down.

In that vein, this is an opportune time to catch up on his best career highlights so far. His top works are ranked based on quantity of awards, nominations and a given guild’s prestige.

Honorable mentions
The Simpsons theme earned Elfman his first Emmy nomination after the show’s inaugural season in 1989-90. It has since yielded three BMI awards for television music.

Elfman’s first bid for a Golden Globe came courtesy of Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas in 1994. Other Burton-film soundtracks have garnered Grammy nods, including Edward Scissorhands, Planet of the Apes and Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.

10. Chicago
The year he left his imprint on Spider-Man and Men in Black II, Elfman also contributed two tracks to Chicago. By year’s end, his work on the silver-screen adaptation of the Broadway hit gained BAFTA consideration.

Back stateside, the musical earned Elfman another crack at the BMIs, to which he is no stranger. Since 1987, he has claimed 48 BMIs for TV or film scores, and he upped his total to 20 in 2003. One of the three movies to help nudge him to the milestone that year: Chicago.

9. Dick Tracy
On the heels of complementing the feature-length adaptation of a larger comic-book icon (more on that soon), Elfman reached his second straight Grammy ballot in 1991. While the 1990 Dick Tracy film score did not get him glory there, it did fetch him a BMI film prize.

8. Good Will Hunting
Elfman’s debut at the Academy Awards was a double dip. At that 1998 show, Good Will Hunting made the top five under “best music, original dramatic score.”

In that same award cycle, Elfman took home three BMIs for film music, including one for the Robin Williams-Matt Damon blockbuster. The soundtrack also drew consideration from the Awards Circuit Community Awards.

7. Spider-Man
For his work on the entire mid-2000s trilogy, Elfman amassed 11 award nominations. Of particular note, the first installment’s soundtrack yielded a 2003 Grammy nod.

By 2007, the films had drawn a Saturn win, two BMI wins and five more nominations in less-than-mainstream circles.

6. Milk
Sean Penn’s 2008 biopic of Harvey Milk was the third and most recent project to bring Elfman both an Oscar and Grammy nomination. The Critics Choice, the Gold Derbies and seven less-mainstream academies gave the score equal recognition.

Although Elfman did not beat out the competition on any of the 2009 or 2010 ballots, the sheer quantity of 11 nominations is noteworthy on its own.

5. Men in Black
The satirical sci-fi flick accounted for Elfman’s other 1998 Oscar nomination (for best original musical or comedy score). It also yielded his sixth career Grammy nod, and his first in four years.

Four lower-rung panels put the soundtrack on their respective ballots as well. Two of them gave him their hardware. The BMIs bestowed a film music award while the Saturns, who focus on sc-fi, fantasy and horror, named his work its 1998 music champion.

4. Alice in Wonderland
Of the 10 guilds to nominate Elfman’s score for Alice in Wonderland or its sequel, the three most noteworthy were the BAFTAs, Golden Globes and Grammys. All three had the 2010 film’s soundtrack among its finalists in 2011.

Meanwhile, Elfman’s three victories from the series included a BMI for the original and for 2016’s Alice Through the Looking Glass. In addition, one track from the original, “Alice’s Theme,” won a 2011 International Film Music Critics Award (IFMCA) for composition.

3. Big Fish
Though he did not come out on top, Elfman earned his greatest quantity of qualitative nods for the 2003 tearjerker. He was up for an Oscar and a Golden Globe in 2004, then a Grammy in 2005.

Eight smaller-scale committees, including the Critics Choice and the Gold Derby, likewise considered the score for hardware.

2. Desperate Housewives
Following the ABC dramedy’s first season in 2004-05, Elfman won his first Emmy for outstanding main title theme. In the same cycle, he picked up his first of three BMIs for the series. He claimed the other two back-to-back in 2008 and 2009.

In addition, Elfman won two more awards via two smaller guilds before the first season was half-finished. The Online Film & Television Awards and IFMCAs both crowned him for the new theme in 2004.

1. Batman
“Batman has only had one theme,” Elfman told Flashback FilmMaking in 2017.

Out of 12 career Grammy nominations, Elfman scored his lone victory through the 1989 Burton blockbuster. Besides claiming the 1990 prize for best instrumental composition, he was nominated for best original background score.

For his later work on the sequel’s soundtrack, Elfman earned a 1993 BMI Film award. And beyond the live-action movies, his take on the Caped Crusader hit the small screen. In 1992, the same year Batman Returns hit theaters, Warner Bros. Studios enlisted Elfman to compose the theme for Batman: The Animated Series.

More recently, the compositions from the two movie soundtracks have resurfaced in the Lego Batman video games. And not surprisingly, Elfman was summoned to score the all-DC superhero film, Justice League.

For that, in his chat with Flashback FilmMaking, he admitted to drawing inspiration from previous Superman and Wonder Woman composers for those characters. But with Batman, he stuck with what has worked in the three decades since he helped instill a darker take on the time-honored character.

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Old 05-29-2018, 11:47 AM   #734
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Happy 65th Birthday (and many more) To Danny Elfman!



Spoiler!!! Click to Read!:

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Old 06-03-2018, 06:43 PM   #735
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Twyla Tharp's ballet Rabbit And Rogue premiered at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York a decade ago today. Elfman wrote an amusing whimsical score, which somewhat bridges the gap between his first classical composition concert, Serenada Schizophrana, and his score to the contemporary circus performance, Iris: Cirque du Soleil

Frolic
Spoiler!!! Click to Read!:


Rag
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Finale
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Old 06-12-2018, 11:36 PM   #736
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New Orchestral Work by Danny Elfman comes to The Soraya in 2019
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Old 06-20-2018, 02:10 AM   #737
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Hulk was released in theaters 15 years ago today. Ang Lee's dark psychological take on the tragic Marvel character allowed Elfman, who had replaced Mychael Danna on the project, to come up with a more complex score that explored both the psyche between Bruce Banner/the Hulk and Banner's own repressed memories of a traumatic moment during his childhood. It's a score that is very unique from Elfman's superhero output.

Main Titles
Spoiler!!! Click to Read!:


Betty's Dream
Spoiler!!! Click to Read!:


Captured
Spoiler!!! Click to Read!:


Hulk Out!
Spoiler!!! Click to Read!:


...Making Me Angry
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The Lake Battle
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Elfman at the Hulk premiere back in 2003.




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Old 06-27-2018, 02:12 PM   #738
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Timur Bekmambetov's loosely based adaptation of Mark Millar's graphic novel Wanted was released in theaters a decade ago today. Elfman's quirky, propulsive, and masculine score complimented the film's tone impeccably.


Success Montage
Spoiler!!! Click to Read!:


Fraternity Suite
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Fox's Story
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Exterminator Beat
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The Train
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Rats
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Revenge
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The Little Things
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Elfman at the Wanted premiere and after party back in 2008.







Danny Elfman Wanted Video Mashup Contest
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Old 07-09-2018, 12:17 AM   #739
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Elfman's score for Batman (1989) is one of, if not the best score I've ever heard for a film. For me it's up there with John Williams score for the original Star Wars. The music takes the film to another level. Can't imagine what it'd be like without it.

One of my most prized possessions is a copy of the soundtrack that I got signed by Elfman.

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Old 07-10-2018, 12:39 PM   #740
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La La Land Records has redesigned their website.

They've dropped prices on certain titles as well.

Both Elfman's Restless and The Unknown Known are now $5.00 each.

Also: NEW WEBSITE GRAND OPENING CELEBRATION! 25% OFF YOUR ENTIRE ORDER! NOW THRU JULY 22


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Old 07-11-2018, 02:41 PM   #741
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Guillermo Del Toro's second (and final) installment in the Hellboy franchise, Hellboy II: The Golden Army, was released in theaters a decade ago today. Marco Beltrami, who scored the first installment and Del Toro's American films prior to it, didn't return for the sequel and instead Danny Elfman was hired to write the score. For Hellboy II Elfman went back to his roots and wrote a dense score that exhibits the bizarre and mystical world that Hellboy and co. inhabits. Even though Elfman didn't adapt any of Beltrami's themes/motifs, it still manages to be a worthy sequel score to Beltrami's underrated original. Just a shame Elfman hasn’t collaborated with Del Toro on any other projects but Hellboy II.

Introduction
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Hellboy II Titles
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Mein Herring
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Father And Son
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A Troll Market
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The Last Elemental
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A Choice
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In The Army Chamber
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Finale
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Old 07-15-2018, 10:52 PM   #742
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Danny Elfman on ‘Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot’ and Reteaming with Gus Van Sant

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Originally Posted by Collider
From writer/director Gus Van Sant and based on a true story, Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot follows the path to sobriety after a life-changing accident pushes John Callahan (Joaquin Phoenix, with one of the best performances of the year) to discover the healing power of art, willing his injured hands into drawing often quite controversial cartoons that bring him attention and a following. Seeing what led up to that turning point in his life and how he copes with it afterwards, provides a fascinating perspective on the relationships in his life, whether it’s with his old drinking buddy (Jack Black), his sponsor (Jonah Hill), his girlfriend (Rooney Mara), or the eclectic individuals in his 12-step group.

During this 1-on-1 phone interview with Collider, Academy Award-nominated music composer Danny Elfman talked about how he ended up doing the music for Don’t Worry, why he likes collaborating with Gus Van Sant, his interest in the story of John Callahan and what Joaquin Phoenix would bring to it, the experimental creative environment, why he typically doesn’t do research for a project, and what he gets from going to set. He also talked about his more than 30-year collaborative relationship with filmmaker Tim Burton, with whom he’s currently working on the live-action Dumbo.

Collider: I very much enjoyed this movie and your music in this movie!

DANNY ELFMAN: Thank you!

I didn’t really know anything about John Callahan before this and his story was fascinating.

ELFMAN: Neither did I. It was interesting because Gus [Van Sant] is so much a part of Portland. I learned about [John Callahan] through the movie, also.

When you get involved with something like this, especially when you’re working with someone that you’ve worked with before, is it just them reaching out to you, personally, and saying, “Hey, I’ve got another movie I’d like you to get involved with”?

ELFMAN: Well, sometimes. There are all kinds of different ways, but in the case of Gus, it’s more like, I’ll see him, and then I’ll get a phone call where he’ll go, “Hey, I’ve got this thing coming up. Maybe, I’ll send you the script. Check it out.” It’s pretty casual.

Is Gus Van Sant someone where you’re always onboard with what he brings to you, or do you at least want to know what the story is first?

ELFMAN: No, if he calls and I can be onboard, I’ll just be onboard. I’m not like, “Oh, let me check it out and see if I want to do it.” We have that kind of relationship. Sometimes it’ll be something really small, and sometimes it’ll be something medium, but I always try to be there for him. I can’t always, 100 percent of the time, but we’ve done seven movies.

What most interested you in telling this particular story, once you did learn about who John Callahan was?

ELFMAN: Really, it was just a fascinating story. The fact that it was Joaquin [Phoenix] playing the part just made me even more interested. I so much admire Joaquin’s abilities. I was just curious to see what he was going to do. You never know. He’s that kind of actor. It’s funny that it turns out that it was originally for Robin Williams because, with that first shot of Joaquin on the screen, for a second, I thought it was Robin Williams because of the light hair. It was just something about him. I don’t know if he ever channeled anything consciously. Probably not. But, he makes everything more interesting.

Joaquin Phoenix is one of that small group of actors that you forget you’re watching him because he just disappears in whatever he’s playing.

ELFMAN: Yeah, exactly!

When you have a story like this, where there’s not only a real guy, but also his artwork, how much do you dig into all of that for inspiration, along with having the script and the film for reference?

ELFMAN: I generally don’t do a lot of research and the reason is that I get preconceived ideas, which, in my experience, don’t normally survive to the end. I know it sounds strange, but I learned many years ago, when I said, “Oh, I’ll write some stuff from the script,” that when I see the movie, I always feel differently. I realized that there are so many ways to shoot a script. There are ten different ways to do it, and each of them is going to need a different score – if the movie is very matter of fact, if it’s very dry, if it’s more atmospheric, if you’ve got more dissolves or shock cuts. The acting, the lighting, and all of those things contribute to the tone of the music. So now, I do the opposite, which is really to go in as blank as possible, the first time I see the movie. I really want to empty my mind of any preconceived ideas.

When you started working on this, did Gus Van Sant say anything to you, at all, about what he was looking for, or what he might have wanted you to bring to this, or was it a completely blank slate?

ELFMAN: Well, he’ll talk to me about he feels about characters, when we’re first starting, and I’ll start coming up with rough ideas and things. With Gus, I’m just gonna experiment a lot. He likes to really try different things out. There was a point where we wee doing jazzier stuff, and that jazz piece actually survived the opening titles, which I was real pleased with. I was happy because, in the first screening, a lot of people thought it as actually some kind of jazz music that they dropped in, but I was really just experimenting. He also likes to pull things. He likes to take things and switch them around. Something I wrote for one scene, he might put in another scene. With Gus, I just keep everything real loose and open because he’ll want to experiment. Because he wants to experiment, I’ll experiment a lot. With the music, he also likes to not necessarily fit in a normal way, stylistically, but jump around from something that’s abstract to something that’s sentimental to something that’s kind of crazy. He likes to mix it up. I just always keep that in mind, when working with him.

You’ve said to that you like to go to set when you’re working on a project, which seems like it might be something that composers don’t typically do. How does that help you when you’re working on the music for something?

ELFMAN: Sometimes when I’m on the set, I’ll start getting some thoughts because, even though I’m not necessarily seeing the cinematography as it’s really going to look in the editing, I am seeing the performance and maybe I’m looking at some scenes through the camera. First off, I just like hanging out on set. It’s fun for me. Secondly, occasionally, there’s something about a performance I might see, that will actually inform me of something that I might find useful.

For this film, you used piano, guitar, a string quartet, and some vocals from Petra Haden, which is very cool. What ultimately ended up making those instruments the ones that worked for this, and what do you feel her voice added?

ELFMAN: God, I don’t know. I’m not sure how to answer that. I’m just doing stuff. I love working with Petra, so I if I have an idea that involves voice, I’ll call Petra. She lives in my ‘hood. She can just pop over and we can try some stuff. She’s just so great to work with. Really, any chance I get to do something with Petra, I take it. I used her on The Circle, and this. She’s just a dream because she will try anything. Sometimes I’ll just let her improvise. We were doing a thing that I’d written out and I said, “Do you want to try just improvising the part around that?” She said, “Does the Cookie Monster love cookies?”

That’s cool! It definitely sounds like a very creative environment.

ELFMAN: Yeah, it’s fun. There wasn’t any idea or intention. I usually don’t work that way. It’s more about what would be interesting or fun. I try never to get too literal with any ideas.

I’m very excited about Tim Burton’s take on Dumbo, which you’re also scoring. I have to admit, the recent trailer had me a little bit teary-eyed.

ELFMAN: I hope that sticks! I just watched it, just a week ago in London.

What you can say about your work on that? Is that a story that you had been a fan of?

ELFMAN: Well, who isn’t, in some level, a fan of the original? But I knew this would be very different. I haven’t really started yet, so I don’t have too much that I’ve done. I know that I’m gonna want to touch on a few of the melodical riffs from the original, just to pay tribute in some moments. It’s a classic, but on the other hand, this is a movie and not the animated film, which was real simple and basic. That was a different thing.

Your first score was with Tim Burton, and over 30 years later, you still have this great collaborative relationship with him. What does having a creative relationship like that mean to you, personally, and what do you most enjoy about working with someone like him?

ELFMAN: Working with Gus, or working with Tim, or working with anybody repeatedly, you know a little bit about what to expect. With Gus, it’s gonna be very relaxed. With Tim, it’s gonna be more of a process of finding something, searching and digging for something inside his head, and the inside of his head can be a very tricky place to live. With Gus, it’s gonna be definitely more experimental. He’s gonna want to try a couple of crazy ideas that are going to be like, “Really?!” It’s just gonna be a very different thing.

Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot opens in theaters on July 13th.


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Old 07-15-2018, 11:08 PM   #743
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Danny Elfman Talks Crafting Music for Gus Van Sant’s ‘Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot’
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Originally Posted by Entertainment Voice
Danny Elfman has composed scores for characters large and small. From the baroque symphonies of Tim Burton’s “The Nightmare Before Christmas” and “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory” to major motion pictures such as “Spider-Man” and “Justice League,” Elfman has crafted cinematic soundscapes that imprint themselves in the viewer’s mind. “Edward Scissorhands,” “Beetlejuice” and “Dick Tracy” are other classic titles featuring his name.. Now the maestro has reunited with director Gus Van Sant for “Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot,” which tells the tragic, comedic and inspiring story of cartoonist John Callahan, played by Joaquin Phoenix.

With Van Sant’s trademark style, serene, quirky yet with a very human touch, the movie chronicles Callahan’s journey as his partying ways get him into a car accident. Paralyzed for life, he begins an emotionally painful recovery process which leads him to new friendships and a discovery of a hidden talent for drawing. Callahan soon begins channeling his inner thoughts, rages and observations into cartoons full of acidic wit, sarcastic puns and lighthearted winks.

Elfman has collaborated with Van Sant multiple times in notable films such as “Good Will Hunting,” “Milk” and even the director’s shot by shot remake of “Psycho.” For “Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot,” Elfman uses a wistful approach featuring a piano and string quartet combination to capture Callahan’s fractured, quirky life and personality. The composer recently took some time to share with Entertainment Voice the process of crafting this score and the overall task of bringing a musical identity to a cinematic vision.

It’s been a lot of great films and a lot of great scores that you’ve given us. How did you prepare for this particular film? It’s such an interesting style that Gus Van Sant brings to this story.

I know this sounds weird, but I really try not to prepare as much as I can. I like to come in with my head as empty as possible. Other than the fact that Gus Van Sant sent me the script early on, I thought it was going to be really fun, especially knowing Joaquin Phoenix was going to play the lead role. I’m always so curious about what he’s going to do with anything. But I tried to come in with as few pre-conceived ideas as possible. There’s a point where I’m going to look at the film for the first time, and it’s never going to be what I imagined while reading the script, ever. It’s going to have its own tone, its own style and feel with the performances, editing and lighting. I’ll get interested in a story, but I won’t really have an idea until I see a rough cut.

We in the audience are obviously hearing the final product. But how does the process actually begin? Do you work at home? Do you have a specific place where you like to go and write the music?

I’m just at home. I have a studio in East Hollywood also that I work out of. Either place it’s the same, I’m just watching video and I have a piano and a bunch of sounds in front of me and I start to experiment. Now with Gus in particular, I am going to want to try a lot of radically different ideas because he really likes to mix and match. He likes to say “let’s do something completely crazy. Let’s just try it, let’s just experiment. Let’s try something crazy.” It’s just the way it is with him, which is one of the reasons I appreciate working with him. Sure enough this crazy jazz piece became the opening title sequence for the movie.

How is working with Gus Van Sant different from working with some of these other major directors you’ve collaborated with over the years? What sets him apart from someone like Tim Burton?

He in particular he likes to mix up styles of music. He likes to play things off the mark. There’s times where there’s something sentimental, and I can play something sentimental and he’ll say “let’s just play something really different there.” I don’t know how else to put it, he likes to kinda DJ and mix things up in a way that I find really fun. It’s never going to be quite what I’m expecting.

Once you have the idea for the score set, once you’ve written it, how long does it usually take to then record and get it all together for the film?

I’m usually on a film anywhere between six weeks and twelve or fourteen weeks. It can vary. Three months would be the average for a film. Let’s say I’m on for ten weeks, out of those ten weeks I’ll be using a couple of weeks for just experimenting and kind of messing around, then a week for honing down certain scenes. At a certain point it’s like, ok we’ve got six weeks, let’s really get down and start to score scenes and get more specific. In the end recording it, it depends on the score. If it’s a big orchestral score I can do anywhere from three days to a week in the studio. A movie like this I do it all in-house. It’s mostly me, guitar, piano, percussion, synthesizers. Sometimes I’ll be able to use a quartet. A low budget movie like this has a lot of restrictions, but that makes it more challenging.

Do you prefer working at home as opposed to standing in front of the whole orchestra in a concert hall?

I really like both. I like doing a movie like “Don’t Get Far on Foot” at home, but I’m about to do “The Grinch,” and that will be an entire week in front of a big orchestra with a choir and all that.

What are your thoughts on the current state of film composition? We’re starting to see a big mix up of styles. Synth scores are coming back in a big way.

It’s always changing and searching. I’m happy to see synth coming back, I like doing synth scores too. If I have one criticism it’s that there are too many big scores that feel like they’re all just orchestration. They feel very big, and never seem to do the wrong thing moment to moment, but nothing sticks with me. That leaves me like “eh.” But as soon as I feel very negative, like it’s all just big orchestration, then something interesting comes along that mixes it all up. I was very critical last year, then I heard the “Phantom Thread” score Jonny Greenwood did and I said, “this was the best score I’ve ever heard.” Anything is possible. There’s a lot of good scoring being done on TV too. You’ve got stuff that sounds generic, generic, generic and then “wow, what was that?!”

We’re barely half-way through the year but have any scores stood out for you from the movies you’ve been able to see this year?

Marco Beltrami did a great job in “A Quiet Place.” I loved that, that was a dream, doing a film with almost no dialogue. I would have killed for that (laughs). I would have killed Marco, if I thought it would have gotten me the job. But I happen to love Marco, so I wouldn’t actually kill him. I might kidnap him and have him held hostage in a cave. There was also a really interesting soundscape in “Hereditary,” not a traditional score at all, but I enjoyed it quite a bit. Unfortunately, like many people who work on films, I won’t get to see many of them until I get my Academy screeners at the end of the year.

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Old 07-16-2018, 11:15 PM   #744
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Danny Elfman to Score ‘The Voyage of Doctor Dolittle’

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Danny Elfman has been hired to score the upcoming fantasy adventure The Voyage of Doctor Dolittle. The film is directed by Stephen Gaghan (Syriana, Gold) and stars Robert Downey Jr., Jim Broadbent, Antonio Banderas and Michael Sheen. The project’s voice cast includes Selena Gomez, Tom Holland, Emma Thompson, Ralph Fiennes, Rami Malek, Octavia Spencer, Kumail Nanjiani, Craig Robinson, John Cena, Marion Cotillard, Carmen Ejogo and Frances de la Tour. The movie is based on the character from Hugh Lofting’s 1920s series of children’s books about a Victorian-era physician who opts to treat animals instead of humans because he’s able to speak with them. Susan Downey (Sherlock Holmes, The Judge) is producing the movie for Team Downey, alongside Joe Roth (Alice in Wonderland, Maleficent) and Jeff Kirschenbaum (xXx: Return of Xander Cage). The Voyage of Doctor Dolittle is set to be released on April 12, 2019 by Universal Pictures.

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Old 07-20-2018, 02:57 PM   #745
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Martin Brest’s action comedy/ semi buddy road trip movie Midnight Run (starring Robert De Niro and Charles Grodin) was released in theaters 30 years ago today. Elfman wrote a blues driven score that distinguished it from the comedies he scored at the time. The score is still quite unique from his overall output. Aside from Forbidden Zone, the Midnight Run score is probably the closest to an Oingo Boingo score. Sometime last year La-La Land Records mentioned about re-issuing the soundtrack, which has been long OOP for many years, this year. Hopefully it doesn’t/didn’t get postponed to next year or beyond..

Midnight Run - Walsh Gets The Duke / Main Titles / Diner Blues
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Try To Believe
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Old 07-22-2018, 09:40 PM   #746
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Big Top Pee Wee, the sequel to Pee Wee’s Big Adventure, was released in theaters 30 years ago today (two days after Midnight Run was released). Although Tim Burton didn’t return to direct it, Elfman returned as composer. However, due to legal reasons (due to both films being distributed by separate studios) Elfman couldn’t adapt or expand upon his themes from Pee Wee’s Big Adventure. Elfman’s Big Top Pee Wee still manages to be worthy companion piece to his Pee Wee’s Big Adventure. Elfman wrote a quirky frolic score that was sort of a stepping stone for his circus/carousel music that recurred in some of his scores from that era. Big Top Pee Wee is easily one of Elfman’s most underrated scores from earlier in his career. For those still interested in this score the La-La Land Records expanded album is still available as of the date of this post.


Big Top Pee-wee: Main Titles / Rise 'n Shine
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Old 08-01-2018, 01:38 PM   #747
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All News La La Land (LLL)

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BTW, in case anyone was wondering

LLLCD 1411 - Mission Impossible 20th Anniversary 2 cd set (yes, it was supposed to be released in 2016, but we are still waiting on a rewrite/interview for the notes). Maybe next year?

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Old 08-10-2018, 08:40 AM   #748
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I was reading the McCreary interview about his being a fan of Elfman, and it goes deeper than just being a fan of Oingo Boingo. He states in the liner notes for "The Cape" that his score was a loving homage to Elfman, Shirley Walker, and John Williams.

And it is. I highly recommend that album.

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