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Old 12-20-2012, 12:28 PM   #326
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Default Re: Discussion: The Afghan War - Part 2

Hmmm idk about all that. The fact they mentioned that BS photo "torture" scandal makes me skeptical of the rape. Threatening someone with electrocution and making them get naked is no worse than a bad hazing at a frat house. Torture would have been actually electrocuting them which ironically could still be no worse than a hazing lol.

Im always skeptical of this type of sensationalist journalism especially when it comes to a place like Gauntanamo. The whole "negotiator raped a boy while female soldier video tapped sounds like possible sensationalism. Tho it wouldnt surprise me. Sick people are in the military as well and we shouldnt have had children there. And to clarify when I say children I mean under the age 18.

There is a very dark and ugly underbelly of our government and military that most just dont want to think about. With media ever invading the private sector of government expect more of these types of things to come out.


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Old 12-20-2012, 09:32 PM   #327
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Default Re: Discussion: The Afghan War - Part 2

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Originally Posted by Marvolo View Post
Hmmm idk about all that. The fact they mentioned that BS photo "torture" scandal makes me skeptical of the rape.
"Hilas also said he witnessed an Army translator having sex with a boy at the prison. He said the boy was between 15 and 18 years old. Someone hung sheets to block the view, but Hilas said he heard the boy's screams and climbed a door to get a better look. Hilas said he watched the assault and told investigators that it was documented by a female soldier taking pictures.

"The kid was hurting very bad," Hilas said.

Hilas, like other detainees interviewed by the military, said he could not identify some of the soldiers because they either covered their name patches or did not wear uniforms. But he and other detainees did know the names of three, including Graner and Sgt. Javal S. Davis, both of whom have been charged and now face courts-martial. Some of the detainees described a short female MP with dark hair and a blond female MP of medium height who watched and took part in some of the abuses. Three female MPs have been charged in the case so far.

Hilas told investigators that he asked Graner for the time one day because he wanted to pray. He said Graner cuffed him to the bars of a cell window and left him there for close to five hours, his feet dangling off the floor. Hilas also said he watched as Graner and others sodomized a detainee with a phosphoric light. "They tied him to the bed," Hilas said.


Here's the original article about the boy who was raped.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...2004May20.html

Legal documents on one of the abusers is actually online:

"Frederick has been charged with conspiracy to maltreat detainees, dereliction of duty for negligibly failing to protect detainees from abuse, maltreatment of detainees, and wrongfully committing an indecent act by watching detainees commit a sexual act. " Source

http://news.findlaw.com/cnn/docs/ira...42804chrg.html


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Old 12-22-2012, 10:51 AM   #328
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Default Re: Discussion: The Afghan War - Part 2

The Taliban are in France

France is hosting the two-day closed-door session which begins on Thursday near Paris. Hizb-e-Islami representative Ghairat Baheer says his militant group and the Taliban are attending the meeting in France because they admire the French government's decision to withdraw from Afghanistan.

According to Pakistani media, that country agreed to release Taliban leaders that have shown a willingness to support peace talks. It is said that Pakistan and Afghanistan have agreed on the release of Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar. According to former Taliban leader Syed Akbar Agha, Mullah Abdul Salam, Qutbuddin, Mohammad, Mawlawi Matiullah, Mullah Abdullah, Mawlawi Khalis’s son Anwar ul-Haq were released from Pakistani jails about three weeks ago.

Abdul Wakeel Mutawakil, said he hoped the Paris Conference would help bridge the gap between the Afghan Government and its armed opposition. Mutawakil, who is not among the invitees, said that members of the Taliban political bureau in Qatar -- Shahabudin Dilawar and Naim Wardak -- will attend the conference on behalf of the movement.

Sources: VOA, UNAMA.

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Old 12-27-2012, 01:55 PM   #329
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Default Re: Discussion: The Afghan War - Part 2

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Originally Posted by Kelly View Post
It's a pit now, it was always a pit, and will always be a pit.....

I wish for once in our lives, this country would learn from history....but alas, probably not, we are doomed to repeat it.
We started out as mass murderers...I don't see how we'll change when the foundation of our country began with the bodies of the innocent. The only difference now is that we have a huge, bloated government that feels it can do whatever it wants with or without approval of the U.N. or other countries.

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Old 01-11-2013, 08:24 PM   #330
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Default Re: Discussion: The Afghan War - Part 2

U.S. Says Buildings Missing In Afghanistan

January 11, 2013
Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty

WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR) says the United States is missing several buildings it thought it had built in Afghanistan.

John Sopko said on January 10 that he didn't know where the buildings were or even if they were ever built.

In his first public remarks since his July 2012 appointment by President Barack Obama, Sopko said corruption, inadequate planning, poor security, and the questionable sustainability of projects are among the challenges facing U.S. reconstruction efforts in Afghanistan.

He said the United States risks wasting billions of dollars if the agencies charged with implementing new programs and constructing new facilities don’t answer basic questions about how they are carrying out their work.

Sopko said Washington spends some $28 million per day on rebuilding and reconstruction efforts in Afghanistan.



-


LOL, talk about incompetence.

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Old 01-11-2013, 08:49 PM   #331
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Default Re: Discussion: The Afghan War - Part 2

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Originally Posted by Destructus86 View Post
We started out as mass murderers...I don't see how we'll change when the foundation of our country began with the bodies of the innocent. The only difference now is that we have a huge, bloated government that feels it can do whatever it wants with or without approval of the U.N. or other countries.
Um, most countries began with the bodies of many who were innocent.

I don't think I remember reading about any empire, country, etc, that came in and said. "Hey, can we take your land from you, REALLY? Are you sure? Wow, you are so nice, thanks...."

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Old 03-22-2013, 07:22 PM   #332
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Default Re: Discussion: The Afghan War - Part 2

Third U.S. soldier charged with trying to embezzle more than $1 million from Afghanistan

A third soldier has been charged in a 2009 scheme to embezzle more than a million dollars from Afghanistan. According to court documents, the soldiers worked with an Afghan interpreter to use their positions in the finance office to trick an Afghan company into paying them $1,297,050.31.

http://www.fayobserver.com/articles/...0?sac=fo.crime

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Old 03-23-2013, 11:31 PM   #333
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Default Re: Discussion: The Afghan War - Part 2

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Originally Posted by Midnyte_Sun View Post
The Taliban are in France

France is hosting the two-day closed-door session which begins on Thursday near Paris. Hizb-e-Islami representative Ghairat Baheer says his militant group and the Taliban are attending the meeting in France because they admire the French government's decision to withdraw from Afghanistan.

According to Pakistani media, that country agreed to release Taliban leaders that have shown a willingness to support peace talks. It is said that Pakistan and Afghanistan have agreed on the release of Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar. According to former Taliban leader Syed Akbar Agha, Mullah Abdul Salam, Qutbuddin, Mohammad, Mawlawi Matiullah, Mullah Abdullah, Mawlawi Khalis’s son Anwar ul-Haq were released from Pakistani jails about three weeks ago.

Abdul Wakeel Mutawakil, said he hoped the Paris Conference would help bridge the gap between the Afghan Government and its armed opposition. Mutawakil, who is not among the invitees, said that members of the Taliban political bureau in Qatar -- Shahabudin Dilawar and Naim Wardak -- will attend the conference on behalf of the movement.

Sources: VOA, UNAMA.
Can we just get rid of France already? Truthfully,I think in WW2 we didn't liberate France from Germany,we liberted the Germans from France.

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Old 03-27-2013, 02:43 AM   #334
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Default Re: Discussion: The Afghan War - Part 2

the afghan war like the iraq war never should have happened but i am happy that our troops our coming home in 2014 .


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Old 04-14-2013, 02:09 PM   #335
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Default Re: Discussion: The Afghan War - Part 2

Taliban Wipes Out Top Afghan Army Unit, Seizes Outpost



April 12, 2013

The outpost, in a mountainous area of the key border province, was in an area frequented by Taliban factions. The Taliban attacked with 200 fighters, killing all within, though they appear to have abandoned the outpost by the time a second group of Afghan troops showed up.

Taliban spokesman Zabiullah Mujahid claimed responsibility for the attack. Putting the death toll at 15 Afghan soldiers, he claimed the militants managed to capture the post and seize ammunition and weapons without suffering any casualties.

Source: New York Times, Press TV, Antiwar.com

Read more here: http://news.antiwar.com/2013/04/12/t...eizes-outpost/

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/13/wo...unit.html?_r=0

-

That's what happens without air support.


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Old 06-09-2013, 06:43 AM   #336
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Default This is how it was in Afganistan 50 years ago

http://izismile.com/2010/07/23/when_...e_24_pics.html

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This is how it was in Afganistan 50 years ago , before wars and NATO occupation drag the country to the stone ages.
Quote:
British Defense Secretary Liam Fox called Afghanistan “a broken 13th-century country” when he visited it. His words drew fire on him. This happened not because he was wrong, but because he was way too blunt. Actually, Liam Fox wasn’t the first person to call Afghanistan a medieval country. There were people who labeled local inhabitants “barbarians with a 1200 A.D. mentality”. Many people really think that Afghanistan is an ungovernable land with chaos that would never make it out of the Middle Ages.

Still there were times when Afghanistan was a nice country where women could pursue careers in medicine, where people could go to the movies and work on the factories. This country used to produce many goods. It had a government that was able to undertake national infrastructure projects. People believed they had a future, but all their hopes were destroyed by 30 years of war.

Read more at http://izismile.com/2010/07/23/when_...wm6602bRZbq.99
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The physical campus of Kabul University, pictured here, does not look very different today. But the people do. In the 1950s and '60s, students wore Western-style clothing; young men and women interacted relatively freely. Today, women cover their heads and much of their bodies, even in Kabul.

"Biology class, Kabul University."
In the 1950s and '60s, women were able to pursue professional careers in fields such as medicine. Today, schools that educate women are a target for violence, even more so than five or six years ago

"Student nurses at Maternity Hospital, Kabul."
When I was growing up, education was valued and viewed as the great equalizer. If you went to school and achieved good grades, you'd have the chance to enter college,

"Most hospitals give extensive post-natal care to young mothers."
This infant ward in a Kabul hospital in the 1960s

"A laboratory at the Vaccine Research Center."
Above is a vaccine research center attached to a Kabul hospital in the 1960s. Today, medical care across the country is limited by several factors, including lack of electricity. Less than 20 percent of Afghans have access to electricity; many homes are lit by kerosene lamps, with only fans running to combat the heat.

"Hundreds of Afghan youngsters take active part in Scout programs." with students in elementary and middle schools learning about nature trails, camping, and public safety.

"Park Cinema, like many others, provides the needed entertainment."
You could even see Hollywood movies there.

"Mothers and children at a city playground."
a playground a few hundred yards away from the theater, where mothers used to take their children to play. Now, only men loiter in the city parks; it is unsafe to bring children outside.

"Skilled workers like these press operators are building new standards for themselves and their country." Light and medium industry, like this metal shop in the Kabul suburbs, once held great promise for Afghanistan's economy. But today, how could you run such an operation without ample electricity? Now there are only small shops, people who work at home -- no major industrial centers. Currently, Afghanistan's chief export is opium.

"Sarobi hydro-power plant on Kabul River is one of the country's foremost power stations."

Afghanistan built its first large hydropower station, pictured here, in the early 1950s. At the time, it was state of the art. It is still in operation, but unfortunately, in the last eight years, Afghanistan's government has not been able to build a single large power plant of any kind. The only sizable accomplishment has been the expansion of a transport line to Uzbekistan so that power can be imported from the north.

"Gulbahar Textile Plant is one of the most modern in Asia."

Afghanistan did have medium and light industry, such as the textile factory pictured here. There was a sense then that Afghanistan had a bright future -- its economy was growing, its industry on par with other countries in the region. Back then, most of the cotton processed in a plant like this was grown locally. But three decades of war have destroyed industry and the supply chain.

"Kabul is served by an up-to-date transportation system." Compared with the 1950s and '60s, fewer women work outside the home, and their outfits are much more conservative than what you see here.

"Central control panel at Radio Kabul transmitter. Transmitter can be heard as far distant as South Africa and Indonesia." If you flipped through the radio dial in the 1960s, you would hear broadcasts of world news, local news, music programs, funny skits, political discourse, maybe an art program, a children's show. Radio Kabul, a state-run station whose old offices are pictured here, was launched in the 1930s.

"Recording room pre-records many interviews, special service programs for delayed broadcast." Modern Afghanistan actually has a greater number of private radio stations, as well as broadcast and satellite television shows. This is one bright spot. But access to radio and TV depends on electricity, and so in a practical sense, the audience is therefore limited. Only the most well-to-do families have private generators to ensure uninterrupted electricity to power electrical devices.

"Textile store window display."
Clothing boutiques like these were a familiar feature in Kabul

"Phonograph record store." So, too, were record stores, bringing the rhythm and energy to Kabul teenagers

"Cabinet in session." The education level of Afghanistan's cabinet today is far less than it was 50 years ago, when this photo was taken. Back then, most high-ranking government officials would have had master's or doctoral degrees.


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Old 06-09-2013, 07:51 AM   #337
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Default Re: This is how it was in Afganistan 50 years ago

Why is this in the SHH forum and not in the Afghanistan thread in the Politics forum?

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Old 06-09-2013, 08:14 AM   #338
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Why is this in the SHH forum and not in the Afghanistan thread in the Politics forum?
I didn't know that thread existed. Thanks for pointing out. I am sending a pm to the moderators now.

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Old 06-13-2013, 07:04 AM   #339
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WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT
http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=fad_1323519219

Spoiler!!! Click to Read!:
Quote:
In March 2006 four US soldiers from the 101st Airborne Division gang raped a 14 year old Iraqi girl and murdered her and her family —including a 5 year old child. An additional soldier was involved in the cover-up.

One of the killers, Steven Green, was found guilty on May 07, 2009 in the US District Court of Paducah and is now awaiting sentencing.

The leaked Public Affairs Guidance put the 101st media team into a "passive posture" — withholding information where possible. It conceals presence of both child victims, and describes the rape victim, who had just turned 14, as "a young woman".

The US Army's Criminal Investigation Division did not begin its investigation until three and a half months after the crime, news reports at that time commented.

This is not the only grim picture coming out of Iraq U.S. forces being accused of using rape as a war weapon.

The release, by CBS News, of the photographs showing the heinous sexual abuse and torture of Iraqi POW's at the notorious Abu Ghraib prison opened a Pandora's Box for the Bush regime wrote Ernesto Cienfuegos in La Voz de Aztlan on May 2, 2004.

Journalist Cienfuegos further states “Apparently, the suspended US commander of the prison where the worst abuses took place, Brigadier General Janis Karpinski, has refused to take the fall by herself and has implicated the CIA, Military Intelligence and private US government contractors in the torturing of POW's and in the raping of Iraqi women detainees as well.”


Brigadier General Karpinski, who commanded the 800th Military Police Brigade, described a high-pressure Military Intelligence and CIA command that prized successful interrogations. A month before the alleged abuses and rapes occurred, she said, a team of CIA, Military Intelligence officers and private consultants under the employ of the US government came to Abu Ghraib. "Their main and specific mission was to give the interrogators new techniques to get more information from detainees," she said.

At least one picture shows an American soldier apparently raping a female prisoner while another is said to show a male translator raping a male detainee.

Further photographs are said to depict sexual assaults on prisoners with objects including a truncheon, wire and a phosphorescent tube.

Another apparently shows a female prisoner having her clothing forcibly removed to expose her breasts.

Detail of the content emerged from Major General Antonio Taguba, the former army officer who conducted an inquiry into the Abu Ghraib jail in Iraq.

Allegations of rape and abuse were included in his 2004 report but the fact there were photographs was never revealed. He later confirmed their existence in an interview with the Daily Telegraph in May 2009.

The London newspaper further noted “graphic nature of some of the images may explain the US President Obama’s attempts to block the release of an estimated 2,000 photographs from prisons in Iraq and Afghanistan despite an earlier promise to allow them to be published.”

Maj. Gen. Taguba, who retired in January 2007, said he supported the President’s decision, adding: “These pictures show torture, abuse, rape and every indecency.

“The mere description of these pictures is horrendous enough, take my word for it.”

In April, Mr. Obama’s administration said the photographs would be released and it would be “pointless to appeal” against a court judgment in favor of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU).

But after lobbying from senior military figures, Mr. Obama changed his mind saying they could put the safety of troops at risk.

In May, he said: “The most direct consequence of releasing them, I believe, would be to inflame anti-American public opinion and to put our troops in greater danger.”

In April 2004, new photographs were sent to La Voz de Aztlan from confidential sources depicting the shocking rapes of two Iraqi women by what are purported to be US Military Intelligence personnel and private US mercenaries in military fatigues. It is now known, Cienfuegos wrote in May 2004, that hundreds of these photographs had been in circulation among the troops in Iraq. The graphic photos were being swapped between the soldiers like baseball cards.


Asian Tribune carries here three of the ‘Rape’ photographs which have brought criticism that the U.S. forces in Iraq have used rape as a weapon of war.

- Asian Tribune -

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Old 08-25-2013, 11:34 AM   #340
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Default Re: Discussion: Afghanistan II

So Yeah...opinions are truly just like certain type of holes...everybody has one.


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Old 09-15-2013, 04:07 PM   #341
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Default Re: Discussion: Afghanistan II

Maybe somebody can explain this to me,but why suddenly are people referring to Afghanistan as an illegal war? More and more comments I've seen the last few years or so suggest that we shouldn't have even been there,or that we illegally went in there. Um,huh??
Say what you want about Iraq,but going into Afghanistan was absolutely necessary. Al qaeda set up shop in Afghanistan,and were supported by the Taliban. To have ignored going in there and dealing with that country means we would've ignored that horror that was unleashed on us on September 11th. There's no way in hell that was an illegal war. In fact,it was fully justified. Now,maybe the plan to set up a democracy there might have been messed up,but not going in there in the first place.

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Old 09-15-2013, 05:10 PM   #342
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Default Re: Discussion: Afghanistan II

In my opinion what killed countless civilians, as well as countless Americans could have been done through special ops. But we went in as a knee jerk reaction and far too much emotion over calculated military precision. And then suddenly, we forgot about Afghanistan, without doing what we went to do find Bin Laden.

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Old 07-08-2014, 09:58 AM   #343
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Default Re: Discussion: Afghanistan II

Runner-up in Afghan Presidential Election Calls Results a "Coup"



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Afghanistan's election drama got worse this week when the preliminary results of last month's presidential runoff were released to show contender Abdullah Abdullah losing by a wide margin. His camp responded by calling the election a "coup" against the people's votes.

This sets Abdullah on the path to creating a parallel government and further pits him against Ashraf Ghani, who won the runoff with 56.44 percent of the vote. That number could change when the official results are released by the election commission on July 22. Abdullah and his camp say the entire election is fraudulent and are asking for a recount of at least 7,000 votes.

Abdullah spokesman Mujib Rahman Rahimi told Reuters yesterday, "We don't accept the results which were announced today and we consider this as a coup against people's votes." To a crowd of supporters Tuesday morning, Abdullah said he would never "accept a fraudulent government. We are the winners of this round of elections, without any doubt."

Abdullah didn't explicitly say he'd make a power grab, however. "We don't want civil war, we don't want a crisis. We want stability, national unity, not division," he told the crowd.

Ghani's supporters, who come mostly from the Pashtun tribes in the south and east, are currently celebrating in the streets. Abdullah draws much of his support from Afghanistan's Tajik minority.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry has, of course, expressed concern about what will happen when the supposed fraud is investigated and the final votes are tallied. Reuters notes, "Without a unifying leader accepted by all sides, Afghanistan could split into two or more fiefdoms along tribal fault lines, or even return to the bloody civil war of the 1990s."

The election was supposed to be the first democratic transfer of power in Afghanistan's history.
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-28206218

Well I guess this is to be expected in their first real election. If it is a voter fraud issue at least they didn't make the margin blatantly obvious like the elections in Syria. Hopefully they can move forward as a nation and build themselves up from this

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Old 07-08-2014, 10:02 AM   #344
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The President of Afghanistan rules Kabul....tribal leaders rule everything else, doesn't matter who wins, and the Without a unifying leader quote???? Do they know the country they are talking about?

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Old 07-15-2014, 11:39 AM   #345
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Default Re: Discussion: Afghanistan II

At Least 89 Dead After Car Bomb Explodes in Crowded Afghanistan Market



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At least 89 people were killed in a suicide car bomb attack in the Paktika province of Afghanistan this morning. No group has yet taken responsibility for the attack, but Reuters notes that members of the Pakistani Taliban have been retreating to this area of Afghanistan to avoid military attacks in Pakistan.

The bombs exploded in a crowded market, according to the district governor of Paktika. Mohammad Raza Kharoti told Reuters, "The explosion was so big it destroyed many shops. Dozens of people are trapped under the roofs." The death toll has been rising all morning, and Afghanistan General Zahir Azimi said it still could go up.

Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid said in a statement that the attack was not ordered by Taliban leadership and welcomed an investigation. The Taliban did take responsibility, however, for another attack on media employees of President Hamid Karzai. That attack used a concealed bomb to kill two of Karzai's employees; five others were wounded.
http://www.nytimes.com/reuters/2014/...er=rss&emc=rss

Will be interesting to see how much further into madness it will descend once we pull the troops out. Over a decade of war and it accomplished pretty much nothing

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Old 07-17-2014, 12:09 AM   #346
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Default Re: Discussion: Afghanistan II

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Originally Posted by DJ_KiDDvIcIOUs View Post
Runner-up in Afghan Presidential Election Calls Results a "Coup"





http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-28206218

Well I guess this is to be expected in their first real election. If it is a voter fraud issue at least they didn't make the margin blatantly obvious like the elections in Syria. Hopefully they can move forward as a nation and build themselves up from this
The two rival politicians have agreed to an audit performed by International teams. Ashraf Ghani is still poised to win. Dr. Abdullah's warlord affiliations with the Panjsheri Mafia has hurt him in the South and the East and he can't even come close to uniting the country unless he has strong support from the ethnic majority in the country, the Pashtuns.

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Old 07-28-2014, 02:41 PM   #347
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Default Re: Discussion: Afghanistan II

U.S. Successfully Exports its Second Amendment Values to Afghanistan



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This is America, and when America launches a war to make not-America more like America, by God, America does it right. Which is why we can now declare unconditional victory in Afghanistan: victory for the American bedrock value of flooding a country with legal guns that end up in illegal hands.

The Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction has published the final word on America's great triumph, in which the U.S. taught Afghan security forces that freedom is built upon the introduction of hundreds of thousands more automatic weapons than the nation needs, and the poor registration, tracking, and ultimate loss of most of said weapons as the military shrinks:

As of December 30, 2013, DOD had provided over 747,000 weapons and auxiliary equipment valued at approximately $626 million to the ANSF [Afghan National Security Forces]. Included in these figures are over 465,000 small arms provided as of November 13, 2013...

Current ANSF records do not adequately provide accountability of all weapons transferred by the United States and the coalition, and [U.S. trainers have] identified weaknesses in the ANSF's ability to safeguard and account for weapons. As a result, U.S. and coalition-provided weapons are at risk of theft, loss, or misuse.


How many of Afghanistan's U.S.-provided firearms are ultimately untraceable at this point? Oh, probably most of them:

Of the 474,823 total serial numbers recorded in OVERLORD, 203,888 weapons (43 percent) were missing information and/or were duplicative. 410,911 (87p ercent) of the 474,823 data entries we reviewed in OVERLORD did not contain a title transfer date.

Investigators fanned out to four arms depots across Afghanistan and tried to match records to weapons held there. They didn't do so hot; one central armory was missing 740 M-16s rifles, 24 M-2 machine guns, and all 112 of the M23 pistols that were supposed to be there.

The rapidly-disappearing weapons—which investigators say are likely to disappear more rapidly into the hands of insurgents as the Afghan army draws down—also include M249 light machine guns, M203 grenade launchers, RPG-7 antitank grenade launchers, and buttloads of AK-47s.

In some cases, record-keeping was so bad that the Army investigators couldn't even try to account for the guns given over to Afghan depots. Which means:

Given the Afghan government's limited ability to account for or properly dispose of these weapons, there is a real potential for these weapons to fall into the hands of insurgents, which will pose additional risks to U.S. personnel, the ANSF, and Afghan civilians.

Enjoy all that freedom, Afghanistan. And remember, the only thing that stops a bad guy with a gun is an open credit account with the DOD. Lots of paperwork, but no fuss!
http://www.sigar.mil/pdf/Audits/SIGAR-14-84-AR.pdf

Can you smell the freedom folks? Because "Murica! That's how we roll! It's not like arming Afghan rebels has ever blown up in our faces in the past

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Old 08-05-2014, 11:09 AM   #348
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Default Re: Discussion: Afghanistan II

U.S. General Reportedly Killed by Afghan Soldier in Attack Near Kabul



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According to a report from The New York Times, a U.S. major general was killed in an attack by a lone Afghan soldier on Western troops at a military training academy near Kabul today. Other Americans were shot, and the death toll is expected to rise.

The Times notes that the general who was killed—his name has not yet been released—is the highest-ranking service member to die in the war in Afghanistan. The details of this "insider attack" and what prompted it remain unclear. NBC News reports:

U.S. officials told NBC News that most, if not all, of the victims were American. They said a lone gunman opened fire at a group that included American officials at the Camp Qargha training facility. ...

Officials earlier had told NBC News that the three Western troops had died but later revised the figure. There was no immediate explanation for the discrepancy, however, death tolls often change in the confusing aftermath of such attacks.


An Afghan soldier who was guarding the entrance to Camp Qargha told the Times that "senior Afghan and coalition officers had been meeting there [today], and that reports from inside the camp indicated that a number of the foreign officers were shot in the attack."

A coalition soldier reportedly fired a warning shot to keep journalists away from the scene after the attack.
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/06/wo...tack.html?_r=0

Well that sucks, rare to lose such a high ranking person in today's wars

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Old 08-05-2014, 01:03 PM   #349
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Default Re: Discussion: Afghanistan II

Why are we in Afghanistan anyway? It's like it's the war nobody is talking about

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Old 08-05-2014, 01:15 PM   #350
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Default Re: Discussion: Afghanistan II

Boy reading this article...

I still think those soldiers involved in the torture scandal should have been executed.

But ever since Vietnam, American soldiers just aren't held accountable. Remember Mai Lai? Slap on the wrists for everyone.

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