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Old 02-19-2013, 05:47 AM   #26
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Default Re: Bought/Thought - 2-13-13

And in contrast to Corps' opinion... O'Grady's the only Ant Man who I have any real interest in. Lang's only decent in connection to Cassie and Pym's a 'waste of space' in my book

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Old 02-21-2013, 06:07 PM   #27
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Default Re: Bought/Thought - 2-13-13

... He said, even though we all know his pre-Bendis Avengers hate means he's read almost nothing featuring Pym.

I agree on Scott, though. He's okay but there's nothing to really define him as more than just another size-changing smart guy besides his daughter.

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Old 02-22-2013, 05:19 AM   #28
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Default Re: Bought/Thought - 2-13-13

I read Pym's stuff during the Proctor era. I read some of Johns' stuff and all of Austen's stuff. I read all of Slott's Mighty Avengers. I've read 2/3rds of Avengers Academy.

Sorry but the "scientist supreme" just doesn't do it for me. O'Grady, however, has been a hoot since his debut.

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Old 02-22-2013, 01:37 PM   #29
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Default Re: Bought/Thought - 2-13-13

My love for Pym comes mainly from Avengers West Coast and Busiek's run. Pym was barely a factor in the Proctor era, Austen's categorically terrible at everything, and Slott's take was pretty weird. I don't remember how Johns wrote Pym.

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Old 02-22-2013, 01:47 PM   #30
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Default Re: Bought/Thought - 2-13-13

Johns was who I read the least of. I admit... my indifference toward Pym could easily just be my lack of having read good comics with him. I'll read Busiek one of these days.

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Old 02-22-2013, 01:52 PM   #31
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Default Re: Bought/Thought - 2-13-13

Fair enough. If Busiek can't turn you around on the classic Avengers, I don't think anything will.

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Old 02-22-2013, 06:02 PM   #32
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Default Re: Bought/Thought - 2-13-13

So I ended up getting Secret Avengers #1 for free because my shop screwed up and put it in my box despite me telling them I didn't want it after the renumbering. At first the premise behind the book sounded pretty bad, but after reading it I have to say that I'm slightly intrigued, but still really hated some stuff.

So, Agent Coulson takes control of Hawkeye and Black Widow with some new mind-control nanobots, and makes them agree to go on covert "Blank Slate" missions where they have no knowledge of the mission outside the job itself. The reason why they agree to be mind controlled isn't really clear, I wasn't sure if Coulson just made them, or the scene where he explains why they'd want to was "redacted" as one panel suggests.

Then Hawkeye and Black Widow meet the new Nick Fury. Apparently, Marcus Johnson is taking the name and no real explanation for that is given other than Hawkeye joking that he's like James Bond, taking the same name as the guy before him. Real sneaky there, Marvel.

So they go on mission to Budapest to take down some magic arms dealer who's selling teleportation techniques to Al Qaeda. During the mission new Nick Fury shoots a guy in the head and when Hawkeye complains, Fury tells him they're new bullets that have a built-in healing factor, so the guy's not dead. Kind of a cool idea. Fury then takes off and Hawkeye gets shot in the stomach and wakes up being tortured by the arms dealer. It's revealed at the end that Fury is actually the one who shot Hawkeye, and wiped his mind to test the new mind-wipe software to see how it holds up under interrogation.

While I really don't like the movie integration and the idea of SHIELD using memory wipes to control heroes and maintain deniability for sensitive missions, part of me is curious to see where this goes. What kind of secret missions will they have for Hulk? What' the inevitable fallout for SHIELD going to be controlling people like Black Widow? I don't think I'll continue with the book, but I admit that it wasn't as bad as I thought it would be.

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Old 02-22-2013, 06:08 PM   #33
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Default Re: Bought/Thought - 2-13-13

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My love for Pym comes mainly from Avengers West Coast and Busiek's run. Pym was barely a factor in the Proctor era, Austen's categorically terrible at everything, and Slott's take was pretty weird. I don't remember how Johns wrote Pym.
Johns wrote the issue with Hank and Jan vacationing in Las Vegas before Whirlwind came along to break it up. It was one of his best issues.

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Old 02-22-2013, 09:23 PM   #34
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Default Re: Bought/Thought - 2-13-13

They had wierd sex in that issue

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Old 02-23-2013, 07:26 AM   #35
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Default Re: Bought/Thought - 2-13-13

Hells yeah they did. And it was wild seeing Whirlwind paying prostitutes to dress up like the Wasp so he could smack them around.

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Old 02-24-2013, 01:24 AM   #36
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Exclamation Re: Bought/Thought - 2-13-13

Definitely the "feast" side of the perennial "feast or famine" schedule which seems to dominate comics. Last week I only had 2 comics; this week I got nine. NINE. As always, spoilers ahoy.

DREAD'S BOUGHT/THOUGHT FOR 2/20/13:

ACTION COMICS #17: In this issue, Superman faces the violent manifestation of an evil thought which goes against his very being and all that he represents. No, it isn't Orson Scott Card, it's more of Lord Vyndktvx's time spanning scheme to kill Superman across several time periods at once as some demented revenge fetish crossed with a magic act. It is the sort of usual Grant Morrison story where if you raise a hand and utter, "sir, this has some good bits in it but it doesn't really make any sense without a tab of acid or a severe head injury", the rest of the class will consider you a heathen and tell you to pipe down. The art by Rags Morales and Brad Walker is great and you can see Morrison weaving together everything from his web of a run well. However, I think the biggest summary of my thoughts by this stage was seeing the last page and thinking immediately, "ugh, it's not done YET!?" Having hopped aboard hoping for another ALL STAR SUPERMAN, what I have instead gotten is some very bizarre retcon fan fiction thanks to the New 52 and while it has some fascinating bits, it isn't greater than the some of its parts like ALL-STAR was. I still intend to call it a run and leave this title with Morrison, and I won't regret it. It hasn't been bad, but it hasn't quite reached my expectations.

BATMAN BEYOND UNLIMITED #13: DC's anthology series set in the "unlimited" universe continues with another solid if usually uneven installment, as many anthologies tend to be. Leading off things this month is a new "JLU" story by Derek Fridolfs and Jorge Corona, which seems to lift a chunk of its plot from "BATMAN BEYOND: RETURN OF THE JOKER" as many things here do. A new composite copycat villain - able to gain memories and skills with a touch - and soon presents a threat to the team as they arrive in Central City. We also see Mr. Miracle show up and a new Flash seem to emerge for 2040. Meanwhile, Adam Beechan and Norm Breyfogle wrap up "10,000 Clowns" in which Dana Tan's psycho brother Joker King is finally defeated by most of the cast, although their victory seems pyrrhic at best. Finally the "Superman Beyond" strip by J.T. Krul and Porter is winding along an interesting story of some comeuppance from Superman meddling in the affairs of a planet without considering the long term alternatives - liberating slaves has now pitted the planet into a bitter civil war for which they hold him responsible. In this issue Superman is liberated by some warriors of the class he liberated, who see him as a god and likely will use him to justify more attacks. To a point this reminds me a little of Christos Gage's "Planet Rogue" story from X-MEN LEGACY, only far more interesting. Last time around the Superman strip was the weakest link, but this round it's stepped up. Overall, a solid package as usual.

TEENAGE MUTANT NINJA TURTLES #19: IDW has cleverly chosen to make up for its primary TMNT ongoing title skipping January by having two issues of it ship this month; in addition to a key mini series double shipping last month as well. This issue continues the exciting recreation of the franchise by Kevin Eastman and Tom Waltz with artwork by Ben Bates and Ronda Pattison. Merging lore from the 1987 cartoon with the original issues from 1984-1985, this issue mostly focuses on the Ninja Turtles' struggle on planet Neutrino to aid their new allies as well as survive the war waged by their enemy, General Krang of the Utroms. Having fallen in with the Neutrino resistance (as well as the princess of their royal family, who Mikey is smitten with), the Turtles and their allies engage in a desperate rescue attempt while Donatello and the Fugitoid pool brainpower to solve a larger problem. Said problem is Krang's interest in conquering the Earth as well, a struggle which sees their enemy Karai of the Foot Clan inadvertently aid them. The writers have a lot of characters to juggle this issue across several settings, and while there is a lot of exposition to get through, an effort to establish character voices is evident. Some of the Neutrino rebels are stock characters from central casting, but at least the princess is bold and sassy. The action begins towards the end of the issue and sets up a fair cliffhanger, and very quickly this series has dove deep into the science fiction lore which many fans of the franchise sometimes dismiss for urban ninja action. This remains a terrific reboot of the TMNT franchise in comic book form and regardless of whatever happens with new animation or film, fans new and old can embrace this comic for their shell-back fix.

SAGA #10: Creators Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples continue onward with the series which has easily become one of the biggest critical darlings within years. A merger of Shakespeare and space opera unlike anything yet seen in modern comics, this issue continues along the terrific path paved by previous issues. The cast, which seems to be slowly but steadily growing as the story becomes more complex, remain divided. Marko and his mother are on an apparently living planet trying to recover the former's ghostly babysitter Izabel, while Alana remains on their "rocket tree" with her father-in-law and daughter, Hazel. They are being chased and tracked through space by the mercenary "The Will" and Marko's ex, Gwendolyn - alongside a slave girl who seems to have plot convenient abilities. It appears obvious that the "saga" is being split between two warring families within the context of a cross-breed couple dividing two planets, yet the execution makes such obviousness irrelevant. The issue starts with a flashback towards Marko and Alana fleeing the prison camp where they fell in love and shows how the series can seamlessly shift time around for its narrative. One cast member seems to bite the dust, and there is a hint of the large scale things which some expect of sci-fi epics. At this point we are two issues away (most likely) from the next break and trade paperback, and this issue continues along this new series trend of making innovative excellence look easy.

DAREDEVIL #23: On a week with a high volume of quality comic book products out for readers, it is the seminal run on the "man without fear" by writer Mark Waid and current artist Chris Samnee which continues to impress the most. Solicited as a "jumping on point" merely because it is the beginning of the latest arc, this issue operates in much the same simple brilliance as previous issues usually do. It tells a complete story within twenty pages with terrific art and ripping dialogue, while it serves the interest of the long form serial by building upon previous stories while adding new developments. It is naturally the aim of most monthly comic books, but is a feat which is so rarely executed as flawlessly as Waid's "Daredevil" does, especially within a mainstream superhero comic.

After defeating Stilt-Man last month, the friendship between Matt "Daredevil" Murdock and Franklin "Foggy" Nelson had been repaired after severe strain. The newest wrinkle is that Foggy has been under a lot of stress not only due to being best friends with a bizarre and often unstable vigilante like Daredevil or running a legal practice - it is because he fears he has developed cancer. This issue begins with Matt and Foggy trying to kill time before some critical medical results are in by swinging around town on a billy-club line. As usual for Daredevil, things rarely go routinely and an assault by a new band of villains attracts his attention. As an added wrinkle, the villains this time aren't mobsters or terrorists or bizarre thieves; it is a cabal which seems to be trying to duplicate Matt Murdock's origin sequence to recreate Daredevil. The results have produced a monstrous result, and Daredevil is only scratching the surface of the mystery.

Samnee's artwork alongside colors by Javier Rodriguez continues to be exceptional. With the lone exception of Khoi Pham on a .1 issue, this run has seen some of the best artwork produced for a Marvel superhero series. Mixing and mingling comedic scenes with scenes of action or horror, or even sadness, Samnee continues on this volume's trend of Eisner worthy art which flows with and enhanced an already great script. The last two pages in particular seem to demonstrate this better than anything in a review can. As always, readers picking up issues of this run of "Daredevil" are always in store for a terrific read, month in and month out, issue by issue. One hopes Mark Waid's tenure on this title will be a long one.

DARK AVENGERS #187: Jeff Parker and Neal Edwards' run has become an arc of Exiles, only without any "X" characters involved. Their team of Dark Avengers has been stuck in another reality for a while, and are being played as pawns by the rulers of it - Iron Man, Thing, Dr. Strange and Namor mostly. While they have utilized the technology to recover and enhance themselves - mostly to U.S. Agent's benefit - they still are essentially riding the waves of a story which has little to do with them - and hence the dilemma I have with the arc. There are a lot of interesting details or lines but it doesn't seem to be greater than the sum of its parts, and Edwards' art is a bit flat for me. It's nice seeing things like some alternate Heroes for Hire, but Exiles was never really my thing in comic form and this has become a zombie title for me, something I get more out of habit than enjoyment. I should probably drop it before Parker slips in one good issue among a dozen mediocre ones which convinces me to stay another year. Whatever magic he had from AGENTS OF ATLAS has officially worn off for me.

INDESTRUCTIBLE HULK #4: While not as good as his work on DAREDEVIL, Mark Waid's tenure on the main Hulk title is still enjoyable stuff, capitalizing well from the character's increased popularity after the Avengers film. Lenil Yu's artwork is good on the title, although I am not sure it is as fitting as some of the artists on Daredevil have been. Regardless, Banner spends a few pages with his new supporting cast of second chance lab nerds before being shipped off to fight Attuma, who is making a fuss for people in the ocean. The Hulk's tricked out with some underwater armor but it doesn't prove tough enough for the underwater warlord and his horde of sea monsters. Solid action as always, just there doesn't seem to be as much magic here as with DD. Still, "below Eisner level" doesn't mean it isn't anything less than great.

MORBIUS THE LIVING VAMPIRE #2: This third spin off of ASM within the last few years by Joe Keatinge, Richard Elson and Antonio Fabela continues on its merry way, and is turning into a more low key urban vigilante story. Morbius has escaped the Raft and is essentially just trying to survive in Brownsville without being arrested or hurting anyone, but has stumbled into opposing a local crime cartel run by a massive thug in a blue mohawk. He manages to survive being shot in the chest in a subway and runs into Becky, a homeless artist living in an abandoned movie theater. He also runs afoul of Wanda Evans and gets rooked into trying to save her youngest son from the thug, who's apparently his uncle or something. Finally after 40 pages Morbius does what he should have done last issue and saved himself some trouble - went all vampire on the creep. The gist of course is that Morbius is a tragic monster who would rather not give in to his bloodlust nor is in the mood to restart his vigilante career (he did once feed on criminals during the 90's "Midnight Sons" era), but he's been backed into a corner and has no choice. Naturally, this is akin to having a Hulk comic where Banner gets stomped into the ground for a whole issue resisting transforming into the Hulk, only to finally do so at the end of the second issue; it's the fulfillment of the series' expectation and therefore not exactly a shock in and of itself. I suppose the real meat will be how bad Morbius loses control in the next issue; if he becomes an uncontrollable monster, then it highlights why he took so much abuse before giving in. The irony is after so much pro-vampire pop culture, I almost expect Becky to go, "Pfft, FINALLY!" instead of being horrified. I mean this is a universe where as twisted a hero as Penance was sold to children. "Yes, little boy, one day YOU can wear a spiked gimp outfit and cut yourself for America!" The artwork is pretty good and on the whole the tone of the story is fine, although I do sense a little decompression for the trade. Not as instantly awesome as VENOM or SCARLET SPIDER, but still perfectly entertaining.

SUPERIOR SPIDER-MAN #4: Former "Amazing Spider-Man" solo writer Dan Slott continues along this new Spider-Man title, which essentially continues along the run he had been on for over two years, albeit with a fresh title, lower issue numbers and higher sales due to the gimmick. Dr. Octopus is still in possession of Spider-Man's body, while Peter Parker's "will" seems to exist alongside him as a ghostly figure, occasionally steering his actions or preventing something dastardly. As the cover shows, this issue marks the return of Massacre since "Amazing Spider-Man #656"; a newer creation of Slott's (and Marcos Martin), Massacre is a mass killer with no capacity for human life due to a brain injury. He has escaped Ravencroft Asylum and begun his usual one man crime spree, and this time he's facing a "superior" Spider-Man who is perfectly willing to entertain the thought of killing a villain. In the meanwhile, Ock is disgusted to find out that Peter Parker never became a doctor, so he's marched off to finish his thesis at ESU. On the positive you have solid dialogue ("Accessing memories!") and more cast members starting to sort out that something's changed about "Parker" as well as brilliant art by Giuseppe Camuncoli and Edgar Delgado, as well as a shocking last page cliffhanger featuring the long awaited return of Spider-Man's green themed arch nemesis. On the downside, this issue also has the utterly random and grisly murder of Dr. Ashley Kafka, a once prominent supporting cast member in the 90's of "Spectacular Spider-Man" who hasn't done much in years. While this is hardly the first of Spidey's supporting cast that Slott has killed off for the sake of a story, unlike Martha Jameson or Silver Sable, there was no development or sense of weight; instead it was akin to giving Slott's newer villain a named corpse to increase his notoriety. That blemish makes this one of the weaker issues of the new series' run so far, but by no means does that make it bad. This still is one of the most innovative and suspenseful "mind swap" stories in years for superhero comics, and it does at least interrupt Spider-Man's status quo for a while.

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Old 02-24-2013, 07:17 AM   #37
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Default Re: Bought/Thought - 2-13-13

Uh-oh. Wrong week buddy. This is last week's B/T. Corp and JH were keeping it alive harping over Eric O'Grady and I ended up getting sucked in.

Great read as always though!

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Old 02-24-2013, 08:08 AM   #38
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Default Re: Bought/Thought - 2-13-13

And now I realize that my shop didn't get Daredevil

It should be in next week though.

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Old 02-24-2013, 09:44 AM   #39
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Default Re: Bought/Thought - 2-13-13

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It was odd to see all that done to Hank Pym, especially since he was coming off some good development in AVENGERS ACADEMY. On the other hand, Scott Lang may likely be the Ant-Man of the next film, hence why he's suddenly back.
Wright has said he was using Pym and Lang in the past for his Ant-Man movie so I thought they probably killed off O'Grady and brought back Lang because of that.

Marvel doesn't want two guys going around called ant-man.

I'm indifferent towards Lang but I like Pym when he is well written which is rarely. I never liked O'Grady so I'm not bothered about him being dead or a villain.

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Old 02-24-2013, 07:09 PM   #40
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Default Re: Bought/Thought - 2-13-13

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Uh-oh. Wrong week buddy. This is last week's B/T. Corp and JH were keeping it alive harping over Eric O'Grady and I ended up getting sucked in.

Great read as always though!
D'oh! Guess I should get more sleep before I post. Thanks for the tip!

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