Black Pessimism at 20 year high!

Discussion in 'SHH Community Forum' started by ShadowBoxing, Nov 13, 2007.

  1. ShadowBoxing Registered

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    Study: Black pessimism worst since 1980s

    Blacks increasingly less certain about racial progress in America

     
  2. lilboo Registered

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    Blacks need to stop trying so hard to distinguish themselves in order to achieve equal status (and by the way, i'm black)
     
  3. Lightning Strykez! Former Mod On Pension Pay

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    Meh. :down :up:

    Even I have to admit that the Clinton years were better for minorities (and really everyone who wasn't rich). The only reason African Americans are more bummed out now is because the Government really does not have their interests at the fore. It's a Republican-driven deal right now, which is geared towards rich, upper-class white families. Bush has been in power for a while now, so of course things have not improved...and not just for blacks either--even middle-class white suburban families are worse off because the economy is the utter suck.
     
  4. ShadowBoxing Registered

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    Actually the article says (in that part that got formated weird) that a large percentage (53%, compared with 30%) of blacks blamed themselves [as a whole] for their current lot in life.
     
  5. Arkady Rossovich Registered

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    I've heard of hate rising again in America,is this because the baby boomers are retiring..and their influence on the country is weakening?
     
  6. Wilhelm-Scream Registered

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    Where did you hear that hate is rising in America?
    Where did you hear that it was ever sinking?
    Was this an article in some magazine to which you subscribe?
     
  7. raybia Signing off

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    Its time that African Americans become truly involved in the political process not only by making sure we are all registered voters and showing up on election day but by running for public office on all levels of Government. Then we can be a part of the decision making process to help not only ourselves for all those who need help.
     
  8. jaguarr Be Your Own Hero

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    QFT. :up:

    jag
     
  9. Excel O-bama-ama-ama-ay-ay

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    They are right; we're stuck in dh with **** like jena 6 :o :o
     
  10. SoulManX The Inspector!

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    I think the main problem comes from our history...

    Every race has it own community except us. We have be displaced so much in this country some of us have giving up hope.

    Here in Durham I still here the old heads talk about Black Wall Street.

    The story of Durham might be characterized as a tale of two cities, though in fact the area’s past is far more complex, a heritage of nuanced histories of race and class that have left an undeniable mark on the Durham of today. Durham is often defined in terms of black and white: from its roots in the tobacco industry to its prominence in the Civil Rights Movement to its continued de facto segregation and racial politics, the city is marred by a tumultuous past. John Hope Franklin’s recent response to the North Carolina General Assembly’s apology for slavery speaks to the fact that the pain of human rights abuses in our very backyard are still fresh in the memories of many. Durham is indivisible from its past of racial turbulence, yet this history has given rise to the city’s incredibly unique identity, one that is at once troubled and triumphant. Durham’s spaces are infused with these stories, and try as the city might, it has been and likely will always be unable to shake the influences of segregation and racial strife on its neighborhoods, schools, and economy. However, points of color have bloomed around the city, providing simple elements of much-needed urban rejuvenation, and perhaps more importantly, allowing Durham’s residents to unite around art.
    Hayti: Triumph and Tragedy on the Other Side of the Tracks
    Durham’s early black settlers were former slaves and their descendants who moved to the area and rented land from white landowners. Though they settled around the city, many of these residents inhabited the area that would later become known as Hayti. Over the railroad tracks and down the hill from the city center, this land was out of the eye of white officials and residents and easy for them to forget, although it was a primary source of labor for early Durham’s white households and businesses.
    Rather than be let itself be forgotten, Hayti continued to grow and strengthen, as blacks began to buy up property and establish their own businesses. By the middle of the 20th century, Hayti had become a city of its own: a black metropolis that thrived despite a reign of white oppression throughout the South. Because of strict segregation by law, blacks were relegated to the outskirts of cities and banned from nearly all public amenities shared with whites. In Durham, however, this condition created solidarity and independence among blacks, and as they amassed more properties, businesses, and wealth, the city became renowned nationally as a center of commerce and culture that welcomed black patrons. Downtown, Parrish Street was another root of economic power, home to North Carolina Mutual Life and Mechanics and Farmers Bank, and soon became the famous “Black Wall Street.” But Hayti, a product of segregation, was the true cultural hub of Durham for the black community.

    Despite the vigor of Hayti and its triumph in the face of institutionalized racism, the national and city governments were still white. And as downtown traffic was declining and the suburbs were growing in the 1950’s, the white faces in power realized the state of Durham’s deterioration. Their solution was to revitalize downtown business areas and “improve” the city with a new highway artery. The extension of 15-501 was to be constructed on a sweep of land that was in fact the crucial center of residential and commercial space in Hayti, and the improvements would be made at the cost of black-owned properties that would have to come down.

    The community was wary, but city officials were quick to assure them that they would be amply compensated for their beautiful homes, and a provision was created that required the relocation of businesses at the city’s expense. Having been convinced that they would be taken care of, Hayti’s residents could only watch as their homes were bulldozed, their property confiscated without due compensation, and their community promptly snuffed out. White control had seemingly trumped Hayti’s success, previously a symbol of incredible strength and accomplishment in a severely hostile political and social climate. Gary Kueber, an “urban health consultant” who authors the blog “Endangered Durham” asserts that the demolition of Hayti was overtly racist.

    “While the leaders of Durham did many, many stupid things in the 1960s in their attempts to 'modernize' downtown and 'clear substandard housing,' this was the stupidest. The fact that much of the housing demolished was populated by African-Americans was a good reason not to give a damn what happened to the people who lived in that housing,” he claims. Kueber describes today’s Hayti as a district in which “businesses have gone to die,” where crime is a significant problem, and children are discouraged from playing.

    The old Hayti community was an example of an African American community able to achieve success, solidarity, and renown in the face of a powerfully white, oppressive world. However, the very nature of the area was a result of the south’s extreme segregation policies and the continued dominance of Durham’s white minority, despite the economic power of the black community. Today, the neighborhood has fallen into disarray. The impact of the “urban renewal” project of the 1960s still defines Hayti, as the Durham Freeway runs parallel to Pettigrew Street, serving as a constant reminder of what once lay under the asphalt, and local homes and businesses sag under the weight of generation-old economic ruin.


    What was once Hayti’s cultural center on Pettigrew Street, dubbed “Mexico” and chock-full of bars, theaters, restaurants, and jazz clubs, was one of the first things to go. Now, the area is completely erased of such a lively scene; the land along Pettigrew is completely covered in the cement and blacktop of 147.



    The legacy of Hayti serves as a symbol of Durham’s roller- coaster history. Though it was once a “Black capitol” of the South, racial oppression was as ubiquitous as tobacco throughout the 20th century. The Civil Rights era may have been more physically peaceful here than in other cities in the region, but its costs were paid in spatial fees; by dissolving the black community, white leaders dissolved its great progress and strength, sending blacks many steps backward. It was clear that Hayti, and the Black community of Durham, was not seen as important to the city’s government leaders. “The loss of Hayti created a vacuum from which blacks over forty years old have not recovered,” writes former policeman Marshall Thompson in his book Hayti Police. It is recognized by many that Hayti will not ever truly mend from the injustice it incurred at the hands of a racist society.


    http://www.duke.edu/~cde8/polisci/index.html
     
  11. Mr Jide Registered

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    Black people rely too much on past history as an excuse to dictate their future. They also lack the capacity to work together simply because black people to a large extent can't stand to see each other succeed. Just look at rap music. Beef, wanting to end the careers of their peers. Ugh! Black people can't even succeed at organised crime, thats why the majority of prisons are mostly populated by blacks. In short, black people are their own worst enemy. They need to do all they can to get an education, be the best they can be and learn to cooperate with one another. Look at the jews, asians and even white people. These people can work together for a greater purpose but what do black people do? Complain about their brethren getting a new job or a new house or straight up hating on one thing or another.

    Sure, Racism exists and is some areas its rampant but if black people equipped themselves with the right tools to succeed in life by putting in the effort and finding the means, nothing can stop them, they can start their own businesses. Black people need to wake the f*** up and recognise that there are opportunities but if they think its going to come to them they better think again and start chasin'.
     
  12. Mr. Socko Registered

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    All Black people need is a little makeup

     
  13. jaguarr Be Your Own Hero

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    Wow....strong racism.

    jag
     
  14. kainedamo Registered

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    The problem as I see it is that in America not very many people in power are doing anything to help out people in run down crime ridden areas.

    You have these people, hundreds or thousands of people, all packed into a dead end neighbourhood with no job or education prospects. So naturally you'll get alot of crime. Which in turn turns out all these guys that act like thugs and talk like their idiots and intimidate people which gives a very negative image of black people.

    What can be expected in a society so mad about capitalism? Nobody gives a **** about the poor.
     
  15. SoulManX The Inspector!

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    Charlie is in that last scene:woot:
     
  16. Mr Jide Registered

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    I'm black. Hell, my parents are Nigerian.
     
  17. jaguarr Be Your Own Hero

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    That doesn't make it not racism. :huh:

    jag
     
  18. Mr Jide Registered

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    I'm not being racist. I'm merely telling it how it is. I'm not discriminating or hating. I even came up with suggestions as to how black people in general can rise above the crap they face. I'm not going to suger coat or be pc about this because its such behaviour that ensues tolerance for black people to remain the way they are. Black people need a wake up call because they've been asleep for far too long.

    Africa used to be a continent of greatness, where people from all over came to get educated. The first cities, modern civilization, accademic studies and extraordinary architecture were all here. Fast foward to slavery and then now, people are still clinging onto this slavery business as to why they see no point in moving foward. Why can't black people in general look back to what Africa used to be and strive to reach that level of greatness within themselves? I mean seriously, any black person who has watched the film, roots should feel as though they'd never want to be a failure or be some sort of stereotype but to aspire to something great.
     
  19. SoulManX The Inspector!

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    Good point:o
     
  20. jaguarr Be Your Own Hero

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    But you're also buying into and perpetuating racial stereotypes and making generalizations about an entire race which is...guess what....racism.

    jag
     
  21. Mr Jide Registered

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    I'm not buying into it or making generelizations. I am part of it but I have the intelligence to do something about it. I like nice things but I've been disciplined to work hard and cooperate in order to achieve. I'm 22 and am currently studying for a masters degree in marketing and advertising on top of the business management degree I already have. I've hard part time jobs and even taught maths and english to 7-16 year olds. I know how to speak street lingo as thats what I grew up with but at the same time, I know how to speak good english and apply the right etiquette, when interacting and socialising with professionals and people who aren't street. I simply refuse to become another statistic and I do face a lot of jealousy from other black people but I rise above it because I know I'm simply better than they are. There are no breaks in life, you have to go out and earn it and that is what I've done and do.
     
  22. jaguarr Be Your Own Hero

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    Nearly everything you wrote in your first post was generalizations about black people. :huh:

    jag
     
  23. Mr Jide Registered

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    So? I'm speaking from experience and what people used to think of me. I've seen it and I still do. They maybe generelizations but its generally pretty much the truth. I'm not saying all black people are the same if that's what you're thinking.
     
  24. jaguarr Be Your Own Hero

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    It's your own personal truth, though, and the way you wrote it was as if you were applying it to the entire race, which is what I took issue with. You're not wrong that people need to stop living in the past and look to the future. That's true on all sides. Keeping awareness of what has happened historically is important but dwelling on it and using it to keep progression at bay and cultural wounds open is not healthy, I agree. And everyone does own their own destiny whether they want to recognize or accept that or not. You get out of life what you put into it and there are no handouts. If you want it bad enough, work for it. That's something EVERY person, regardless of gender, race, religion, age, creed or whatever other factor you can dream up ought to come to terms with.

    jag
     
  25. Joined:
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    Whitney Houston ruined Dolly Parton's I will always love you. :wow:



    On topic: I'm from Scotland, only met a few colored people irl, this will probably come across as ignorant, on the subject of racism and black identity in America, what's up with rap? It's like some sort of self racism, it's give off the image that black people are boastfully criminal (guns/drugs/killing/prostitution) simpletons from slums who objectify woman and quite happily sling around the term ****** to each other? seriously wtf is that **** all about? Are the KKK writing there lyrics?
     

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