$chooled - The Price of College Sports

charl_huntress

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Okay, so I just watched this documentary on the EPIX channel called $chooled - The Price of College Sports, and I was blown away. Previously, I had not supported paying student athletes. I went to a PAC-12 school (it was called PAC-10 when I was a student), and I fully believed a college education was all a student athlete needed... Yet, after watching this documentary, I have changed my mind. Ironically, there is a lawsuit working it's way through the legal system that was filed by a player who went to my college.

Here are some details:

http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2014-01-02/how-much-should-college-athletes-get-paid

The edifice of this system is finally crumbling. An antitrust lawsuit filed in 2009 by a former University of California at Los Angeles basketball player, Ed O’Bannon, who didn’t appreciate the NCAA using his image in video games and not sharing the profits, is working its way through the courts, shattering a lot of myths along the way. We are learning to think twice when an NCAA “scandal” breaks and to redirect our outrage at the rules rather than the rule breakers. Why exactly is it wrong for a college football player to get paid for signing autographs? Or for a prospective college athlete to pay a “street agent” to help him get into the right program? Isn’t that precisely what high-priced college admissions consultants do?
What's your thoughts on paying college athletes? Do you think they should be paid? Are the rights of college athletes being trampled on because they are not being paid? Or conversely, do you think a college education is all a student athlete should be paid? Why would paying college athletes be a bad idea?

http://www.cbssports.com/general/wr...-football-players-changing-times-money-say-so

Let them eat cake. Right, Bob?
Coaches get millions and fans spend millions and players are still getting scholarships, and today it's not such a great deal. Arian Foster reinvigorated this conversation last week when he said he took money "on the side" at Tennessee, not because he was greedy but because he was hungry. A handful of active players -- at Georgia Tech, Georgia and Northwestern -- played Saturday with the handwritten letters "APU" somewhere on their body in solidarity for the fledgling movement All Players United.
Today the football coach at Oklahoma makes 300 times what he made in 1950. (Factor in inflation, and Stoops' $4.55 million annual salary is still 31 times what Wilkinson made in 1950.) Today the Sooners are playing in an NFL-caliber stadium and dressing in a 9,000-square foot locker room and working out in a 10,000-square-foot training area complete with hydrotherapy, whatever that is. They store their gear in a 6,500-square foot equipment room that goes through more than 1,400 pairs of shoes in a given year.
Who pays for this? TV does -- and Oklahoma fans do. Ticket prices. Parking. Concessions. Jerseys with their favorite OU player's number on the back.
Players get a scholarship.
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/04/opinion/unfair-business-in-college-sports.html?_r=1&
The N.C.A.A. argues that players should get nothing more than a scholarship (which colleges may cancel), because payment from colleges or outside companies would ruin the amateur model of collegiate sports. That model, however, is fundamentally unfair. Walter Byers, the first executive director of the N.C.A.A. and now a critic of the way it does business, aptly described the athletes’ plight in his memoir: “The college player cannot sell his own feet (the coach does that) nor can he sell his own name (the college will do that). This is the plantation mentality resurrected and blessed by today’s campus executives.”
Mods if a thread for this already exist please do your thing.
 
Last edited:
Okay, so I just watched this documentary on the EPIX channel called $chooled - The Price of College Sports, and I was blown away. Previously, I had not supported paying student athletes. I went to a PAC-12 school (it was called PAC-10 when I was a student), and I fully believed a college education was all a student athlete needed... Yet, after watching this documentary, I have changed my mind. Ironically, there is a lawsuit working it's way through the legal system that was filed by a player who went to my college.

Here are some details:

http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2014-01-02/how-much-should-college-athletes-get-paid

What's your thoughts on paying college athletes? Do you think they should be paid? Are the rights of college athletes being trampled on because they are not being paid? Or conversely, do you think a college education is all a student athlete should be paid? Why would paying college athletes be a bad idea?

http://www.cbssports.com/general/wr...-football-players-changing-times-money-say-so

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/04/opinion/unfair-business-in-college-sports.html?_r=1& Mods if a thread for this already exist please do your thing.
if i had to guess you went to u.c.l.a. and yes my former school is alabama. we had a player who was a 5 star recruit that was living in his car( he is over 300 pounds ) with the rest of his family after hurricane katrina for over a year using only a very limited amount of money as a family. he enrolls and has 2 all american years, 1st round draft pick too. then a yahoo story breaks about how boosters paid him. dont know if its true or not, but giving his that his life before college was of poverty to the third degree can you blame him for taking the money!?
 

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