• Secure your account

    A friendly reminder to our users, please make sure your account is safe. Make sure you update your password and have an active email address to recover or change your password.

  • Xenforo Cloud has scheduled an upgrade to XenForo version 2.2.16. This will take place on or shortly after the following date and time: Jul 05, 2024 at 05:00 PM (PT) There shouldn't be any downtime, as it's just a maintenance release. More info here

Does anyone think the US should do something about sudan?

GoldenAgeHero

Avenger
Joined
Dec 8, 2005
Messages
12,337
Reaction score
1
Points
31
Am i the only who feels this way? the peopleover there are being murdered and pushed out of thier own land, and here we are starting a war over oil(which looking at thecosts of gas now and since the irai war, isnt helping much) i think it would be more beneficial for the US to do something about sudan, it would show other countries that were not war hungry.
 
The reason why no one will help poor nations in Africa (Rwanda, Liberia, Somalia, Western Sahara, etc) compared to say, the Middle East or East Asia is because Africa these days is because Africa is considered to be worthless now. The West came in, took all they could, pulled out too soon, and internal conflicts have only made it worse.
 
hippie_hunter said:
The reason why no one will help poor nations in Africa (Rwanda, Liberia, Somalia, Western Sahara, etc) compared to say, the Middle East or East Asia is because Africa these days is because Africa is considered to be worthless now. The West came in, took all they could, pulled out too soon, and internal conflicts have only made it worse.

Valid points there.
 
ScottyBBadd said:
Valid points there.

It's true, today's Africa offers nothing at all for the Western world compared to the oil of the Middle East and the economy of East Asia. However the blame is not only on the Western powers that abused the continent. Internal problems have made Africa much worse.
 
dialog-vega5.gif
No 1st world country is going to do anything about it since there's nothing to gain from those countries. Wars are extremely expensive and to spend so much of tax dollars on other countries who ain't gonna pay us back in one way or another is meaningless.
 
E. Bison said:
dialog-vega5.gif
No 1st world country is going to do anything about it since there's nothing to gain from those countries. Wars are extremely expensive and to spend so much of tax dollars on other countries who ain't gonna pay us back in one way or another is meaningless.

Which is one of the saddest parts of reality. I wish there was a Doctor Doom out there.....
 
If we went in the democrats would whine about Bush not having a clear plan, no clear way to pay for it, no exit strategy, and would say "give peace a chance", etc.

That being said, I think we should send enough forces to keep the peace...NOT to take out all the bad regimes/militias/govts....since that would be impossible right now.
 
They would, if they had any niceyness in them.:(

But they won't, cos they're is nothing to gain.
 
hippie_hunter said:
It's true, today's Africa offers nothing at all for the Western world compared to the oil of the Middle East and the economy of East Asia. However the blame is not only on the Western powers that abused the continent. Internal problems have made Africa much worse.

Internal problems always make things much worse.
 
Demon Within said:
Which is one of the saddest parts of reality. I wish there was a Doctor Doom out there.....
ex3-vega.jpg
Their already is and their names are Prince Abdul of Saudi Arabia and Kim Jong Il of North Korea. What more could you ask for.
 
E. Bison said:
ex3-vega.jpg
Their already is and their names are Prince Abdul of Saudi Arabia and Kim Jong Il of North Korea. What more could you ask for.

But unlike those leaders, the people of Latveria actually had a reason to love Dr. Doom. Doom gave them employment, socialized health care, and many other things. He basically took care of them in return, the Latverians gave up their freedom. The leaders you mentioned do not do so.
 
No, we should stay out of everything.

Then the world can see that they take us for granted.
 
Oh I would like to point out that any US military effort there is going to be viewed as a war mongering, evil, harsh act. Why? Because we'd send over "peacekeepers", theyd get fired on, the enemy would hide among the citizens in the cities...then we of course would go and try to root them out.

Iraq all over again. The civilians would start hating us for fighting the bad guys, because undoubtably thered be innocents killed. We'd never be able to stop it completely, so whats our exit strategy? When do we leave?

It would be a huge costly operation, that has a big chance of being ineffective completely, that could go on for many years.


:(
 
hippie_hunter said:
But unlike those leaders, the people of Latveria actually had a reason to love Dr. Doom. Doom gave them employment, socialized health care, and many other things. He basically took care of them in return, the Latverians gave up their freedom. The leaders you mentioned do not do so.
vega_5.gif
Well that goes to show how Dr. Doom is NOT a realistic dictator. For all the money he puts into his resources, plans, foreign policies, he would certainly have to starve his own country to do so. I could only imagine how he treats minority groups in his own country.
 
On February 3, 2006, as the United States began its month-long presidency of the United Nations Security Council, the U.S offered a motion to begin plans to send UN peacekeepers to Darfur. The Security Council agreed unanimously to begin the planning process to send the troops, with a final decision to come later. It called for a 12,000 to 20,000 troop presence in Darfur with the 7,000 African Union troops already there being given new weapons and being incorporated into the UN mission. Furthermore, they would have a greater mandate to protect civilians. Nevertheless, difficulties are expected to arise in finding states willing to contribute troops to the UN mission. Although the United States offered the motion, the U.S is not expected to contribute troops to the mission. Also, Omar al-Bashir, the leader of Sudan who is widely believed to be backing the Janjaweed militias in Darfur, has also frequently stated his opposition to UN peacekeepers in Sudan further complicating the problem. Assuming these problems are overcome, UN troops are still not likely to appear in Darfur for nearly a year.
This is the way it should be done... with the an international force sent by the UN going to stop this genocide. They just need to speed up the process of getting troops to Sudan.
 
E. Bison said:
vega_5.gif
Well that goes to show how Dr. Doom is NOT a realistic dictator. For all the money he puts into his resources, plans, foreign policies, he would certainly have to starve his own country to do so. I could only imagine how he treats minority groups in his own country.

Dr. Doom provided for his people so that way his people would fight beside him if some one such as the Fantastic Four, X-Men, or the Avengers decided to come in and overthrow him. He concentrates on those things too.
 
hippie_hunter said:
Dr. Doom provided for his people so that way his people would fight beside him if some one such as the Fantastic Four, X-Men, or the Avengers decided to come in and overthrow him. He concentrates on those things too.
Vega_8.gif
Well that's still unrealistic because evil dictators all have their supporters. Sadam had his own army regardless of how much of an a**hole he was. Right now Kim Jong Ill also has his own army and supporters. In real life, you don't have to be nice to gain support. I like Dr. Doom I am a fan of his but if he was a real life dictator I'd have to admit he'd be no different from everyone else.
 
Darfur rally set for National Mall
Clooney, other celebrities expected to speak
Sunday, April 30, 2006; Posted: 11:06 a.m. EDT (15:06 GMT)

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Actors, athletes and activists concerned about the atrocities in Sudan's Darfur region are joining politicians and religious leaders in urging a greater U.S. role in ending what the United Nations says is the world's worst humanitarian disaster.

A Sunday rally on the National Mall, near the Capitol, that organizers hoped would attract 10,000 or more was one of more than a dozen planned in U.S. cities over the weekend.

Headlining the Washington event was actor George Clooney. (Watch actor George Clooney call for action on Darfur -- 1:59)

Others scheduled to speak included Democratic Sen. Barack Obama, House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi of California, Nobel Peace Prize winner Elie Wiesel and Olympic speed skating champion Joey Cheek, who donated his bonus money to projects in war-torn Darfur.

"You feel completely overwhelmed," Clooney, just back from Africa, told AP Radio News ahead of the rally. "We flew over areas, and my father and I would look at each other and go, this is just too much. But then what are we to do? Nothing?"

David Rubenstein, coordinator of the Save Darfur Coalition, covering more than 160 humanitarian and religious groups, said the aim of the "Rally to Stop Genocide" is to highlight the need for a multinational peace force in the region.

Hundreds of thousands killed

About 180,000 people have been killed and 3 million driven from their homes by fighting in the western Sudanese region since February 2003, when rebels from black farming villages took up arms against what they consider discrimination and oppression by the Arab-dominated government. (Watch the death, disease and dispair in Darfur -- 2:03)

Sudanese government leaders allegedly encouraged militiamen from nomadic Arab tribes to wage a campaign of murder, rape and arson against civilians in the villages.

The international community poured in help in 2005 while pressuring both sides to settle the conflict.

The African Union's Peace and Security Council has agreed to hand over peacekeeping in Darfur to the United Nations after its current mandate ends on September 30. But final approval by the African Union has not been granted.

Obama plans a visit to Africa in August and said he hopes by then "we'll be making some progress on some of these diplomatic fronts."

"The situation there is very delicate," Obama said in an interview. "You've already got people who are displaced. ... Things could get much worse."

President Bush met with Darfur advocates at the White House on Friday and lent his support to the weekend rallies. "For those of you who are going out to march for justice, you represent the best of our country," Bush said.

Five members of Congress were among 11 people arrested Friday after protesting outside the Sudanese Embassy.

The coalition's permit estimates a turnout at 10,000 to 15,000 and is for the area on the Mall in front of the Capitol, said Sgt. Scott Fear of the U.S. Park Police.

Others on the speakers' list were Roman Catholic Cardinal Theodore McCarrick of Washington; Paul Rusesabagina, the hotelier whose shelter of hundreds of people from the 1994 Rwandan genocide was the subject of the movie "Hotel Rwanda"; and hip-hop mogul Russell Simmons.
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Back
Top
monitoring_string = "afb8e5d7348ab9e99f73cba908f10802"