Legendary's Live Action Mobile Suit Gundam Movie

The Big G

A Filthy Ningen
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From the good folks over at Anime Expo, Legendary is teaming up with Sunrise (and I assume Bandai) to bring the Universal Century to the big screen!

https://www.cbr.com/mobile-suit-gundam-live-action-film/


I'd pay full price to see the legendary BRIGHT SLAP in live action

Edit: didnt' see the other thread...feel free to delete Mods
 
Finally, as derivative as it is now.
 
after the Epic Ready Player One Cameo i was praying for a Live Action Take
 
Give me Tallgeese or don't even bother.
 
Please do this after Metal Gear Solid.
 
Brian K. Vaughn is writing the script & the original Japanese anime studio(Sunrise) is overseeing the project. So that right there is a vote of confidence for me.
 
Going by Vogt-Roberts’ work on Kong: Skull Island, I wonder if this will end up being more something ground level like 08th MS Team than traditional Gundam. Though, I guess it depends on what kind of script Brian K. Vaughn wrote, since it mentions that they're using what he wrote.

As for the Gundams themselves, it would be pretty cool if they used a combination of a physical cockpit set built on a remotely controlled rig, ala the first Pacific Rim, with the projection technology they’ve used on The Mandalorian to get the proper lighting and something to give the actors to react to. Would give the fights that weight and the visceral feeling of almost being there.
 
IMHO it's a bad choice. I will explain why. Gundam is not about the giant robots fighting. It's about the people inside the robots. It's about the moral conflicts and themes. The best Gundam stories don't have real good guys and bad guys. Everyone is sort of operating in a grey area. Even the protagonists are forced to make ambiguous choices, or they are working for a side that's in the wrong. Or they are forced to do horrible things for the "greater good."

Also, sometimes the stories have outright frustrating or really more ponderous endings that most western audiences would likely hate or reject.

Also, look at Death Note. Death Note had been kicked around for years. WB had it for a while and kept questioning how to do it. They wanted Death Note but they didn't want Death Note. They didn't want the Shinigami, Ryuk etc.

Netflix did Death note, but it was a very watered down, ****ty version of it. Death Note lacked the nuance and ambiguity of Light Yagami as a protagonist. Light Yagami truly believed in his mission and what he was doing. Light Yagami thought he was a god in human flesh and making the world a better place. He thought it was his job to mold the world as he saw fit and would stop at nothing to do it. He outsmarted almost everybody. And Death Note is told mostly from his perspective. What happens when a brilliant teen, genius level teen is granted the power to control who lives and who dies?

The Netflix movie was a POS. It never asked those greater questions. Light basically uses the Death Note to impress a girl and get some play. Also, Ryuk is more or less an afterthought in the film.
 
IMHO it's a bad choice. I will explain why. Gundam is not about the giant robots fighting. It's about the people inside the robots. It's about the moral conflicts and themes. The best Gundam stories don't have real good guys and bad guys. Everyone is sort of operating in a grey area. Even the protagonists are forced to make ambiguous choices, or they are working for a side that's in the wrong. Or they are forced to do horrible things for the "greater good."

Also, sometimes the stories have outright frustrating or really more ponderous endings that most western audiences would likely hate or reject.

Also, look at Death Note. Death Note had been kicked around for years. WB had it for a while and kept questioning how to do it. They wanted Death Note but they didn't want Death Note. They didn't want the Shinigami, Ryuk etc.

Netflix did Death note, but it was a very watered down, ****ty version of it. Death Note lacked the nuance and ambiguity of Light Yagami as a protagonist. Light Yagami truly believed in his mission and what he was doing. Light Yagami thought he was a god in human flesh and making the world a better place. He thought it was his job to mold the world as he saw fit and would stop at nothing to do it. He outsmarted almost everybody. And Death Note is told mostly from his perspective. What happens when a brilliant teen, genius level teen is granted the power to control who lives and who dies?

The Netflix movie was a POS. It never asked those greater questions. Light basically uses the Death Note to impress a girl and get some play. Also, Ryuk is more or less an afterthought in the film.

That last line is a shame, because Willem Dafoe was perfectly cast.
 
IMHO it's a bad choice. I will explain why. Gundam is not about the giant robots fighting. It's about the people inside the robots. It's about the moral conflicts and themes. The best Gundam stories don't have real good guys and bad guys. Everyone is sort of operating in a grey area. Even the protagonists are forced to make ambiguous choices, or they are working for a side that's in the wrong. Or they are forced to do horrible things for the "greater good."

Also, sometimes the stories have outright frustrating or really more ponderous endings that most western audiences would likely hate or reject.

Also, look at Death Note. Death Note had been kicked around for years. WB had it for a while and kept questioning how to do it. They wanted Death Note but they didn't want Death Note. They didn't want the Shinigami, Ryuk etc.

Netflix did Death note, but it was a very watered down, ****ty version of it. Death Note lacked the nuance and ambiguity of Light Yagami as a protagonist. Light Yagami truly believed in his mission and what he was doing. Light Yagami thought he was a god in human flesh and making the world a better place. He thought it was his job to mold the world as he saw fit and would stop at nothing to do it. He outsmarted almost everybody. And Death Note is told mostly from his perspective. What happens when a brilliant teen, genius level teen is granted the power to control who lives and who dies?

The Netflix movie was a POS. It never asked those greater questions. Light basically uses the Death Note to impress a girl and get some play. Also, Ryuk is more or less an afterthought in the film.

That’s it. That point and drama will totally go over their heads.
 
I think the benefit of Gundam, is that you don't face the pressure to adapt any particular story.
 
I think the benefit of Gundam, is that you don't face the pressure to adapt any particular story.

The downside though is that the closest things we've had to a Gundam movie on a visual standpoint are like Pacific Rim and Transformers.

You can't do a Gundam movie and have it look good unless you have a massive budget. Even the sequel to Pacific Rim cost about $175 million.

You don't only have the mobile suits, but you have the futuristic technology, futuristic aircraft, colonies, space colonies, futuristic WMDs, etc. Doing that and making it look real for a modern audience won't come cheap.

When you really think about it, from a visual standpoint, Gundam in a live-action format is more ambitious than any film ever attempted. Because you don't just have giant robots, you have giant robots fighting in space, beam weaponry, outerspace colonies, and you also have NewTypes. So you have mecha, you have sci-fi, you have the future war aspects, and also the NewTypes which are basically Gundam's versions of mutants.

I think this is also a big reason why we haven't seen Robotech yet. Creating all these concepts in live-action in a post-Lord of the Rings landscape would cost a freaking fortune.
 
The downside though is that the closest things we've had to a Gundam movie on a visual standpoint are like Pacific Rim and Transformers.

You can't do a Gundam movie and have it look good unless you have a massive budget. Even the sequel to Pacific Rim cost about $175 million.

You don't only have the mobile suits, but you have the futuristic technology, futuristic aircraft, colonies, space colonies, futuristic WMDs, etc. Doing that and making it look real for a modern audience won't come cheap.

When you really think about it, from a visual standpoint, Gundam in a live-action format is more ambitious than any film ever attempted. Because you don't just have giant robots, you have giant robots fighting in space, beam weaponry, outerspace colonies, and you also have NewTypes. So you have mecha, you have sci-fi, you have the future war aspects, and also the NewTypes which are basically Gundam's versions of mutants.

I think this is also a big reason why we haven't seen Robotech yet. Creating all these concepts in live-action in a post-Lord of the Rings landscape would cost a freaking fortune.

It'd be like Star Wars levels of budget to fully do properly.
 
IMHO it's a bad choice. I will explain why. Gundam is not about the giant robots fighting. It's about the people inside the robots. It's about the moral conflicts and themes. The best Gundam stories don't have real good guys and bad guys. Everyone is sort of operating in a grey area. Even the protagonists are forced to make ambiguous choices, or they are working for a side that's in the wrong. Or they are forced to do horrible things for the "greater good."

Also, sometimes the stories have outright frustrating or really more ponderous endings that most western audiences would likely hate or reject.

Also, look at Death Note. Death Note had been kicked around for years. WB had it for a while and kept questioning how to do it. They wanted Death Note but they didn't want Death Note. They didn't want the Shinigami, Ryuk etc.

Netflix did Death note, but it was a very watered down, ****ty version of it. Death Note lacked the nuance and ambiguity of Light Yagami as a protagonist. Light Yagami truly believed in his mission and what he was doing. Light Yagami thought he was a god in human flesh and making the world a better place. He thought it was his job to mold the world as he saw fit and would stop at nothing to do it. He outsmarted almost everybody. And Death Note is told mostly from his perspective. What happens when a brilliant teen, genius level teen is granted the power to control who lives and who dies?

The Netflix movie was a POS. It never asked those greater questions. Light basically uses the Death Note to impress a girl and get some play. Also, Ryuk is more or less an afterthought in the film.

The other day, I was listening to a podcast called Screenplay Archeology talk about a couple of the later drafts of Death Note. The first draft, which was supposed to be adapted by Shane Black before he left, while taking place in the US and not a direct adaptation, changes things around in a way that make sense for the story they’re trying to tell while understanding the core and themes of what made the original manga and anime work. Even moments in the final film, like that bizarre chase scene, which originated from this draft, actually works really well and makes so much sense why everyone does what they do.

The last draft, written by Jeremy Slater, described by the podcast host as pretty close to the final film version we got, pretty much throws out all the nuance and retains moments and scenes from the previous draft, like the chase, without understanding what made them work. Whatever involvement Netflix had in actually getting the film made probably had very little to do with all of the creative side of things and had more to do with the financial and distribution side of things.

Yes, Netflix did decide to release the terrible product they did. They do share part of the blame for that. They release a lot of bad stuff. They also release a lot of good, even great, stuff. For better or worse, they’ll release anything if it gets them views and revenue. That still doesn't mean they have carte blanche on everything. Ultimately, the fault of the Death Note movie being terrible lies with the people who made it, the writer of the final draft, the director who filmed and directed the actors and WB, who, let’s be honest, haven't always had the best judgment over the last decade or so when approving and making quality products.

Now, with Legendary and Sunrise overseeing the production, and Brian K. Vaughn, whom I’ve heard is an excellent writer with pretty much everything he’s done, penning the script, does this film have a chance of delivering a good product that understands the core themes of the world of Gundam? I can’t say for sure, but I’d certainly like to hope and think so. This, unlike the 2017 Death Note, actually has quality talent behind it that actually seem to care. That, in my eyes, counts for something.

In the end, I’m going to give the final product a fair chance and judge accordingly, just like every piece of media I consume. Good or bad, I’ll definitely make my opinion known.

P.S.—Also, can people stop bringing up Dragonball Evolution as an example for why anime shouldn’t be made in live action? It’s not 2008 anymore; it’s 2021. We’re way past that now. If you want examples for live-action anime adaptations try Alita: Battle Angel, Bleach or Rurouni Kenshin, which are, frankly, much better examples of films that better reflect their original source material.
 
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The downside though is that the closest things we've had to a Gundam movie on a visual standpoint are like Pacific Rim and Transformers.

You can't do a Gundam movie and have it look good unless you have a massive budget. Even the sequel to Pacific Rim cost about $175 million.

You don't only have the mobile suits, but you have the futuristic technology, futuristic aircraft, colonies, space colonies, futuristic WMDs, etc. Doing that and making it look real for a modern audience won't come cheap.

When you really think about it, from a visual standpoint, Gundam in a live-action format is more ambitious than any film ever attempted. Because you don't just have giant robots, you have giant robots fighting in space, beam weaponry, outerspace colonies, and you also have NewTypes. So you have mecha, you have sci-fi, you have the future war aspects, and also the NewTypes which are basically Gundam's versions of mutants.

I think this is also a big reason why we haven't seen Robotech yet. Creating all these concepts in live-action in a post-Lord of the Rings landscape would cost a freaking fortune.

Netflix just shelled out over $200 million a pop for Knives Out sequels. I'm fairly certain, even with the profit margin of the first, the sequels aren't bringing in that kind of profit margin. The budget is the least of my concerns. I think calling more ambitious than any other film made is placing it on a pedestal that it really doesn't belong on.

And the only reason we haven't seen anything Robotech related is because the rights issues are literal landmine. I think only Godzilla 1985 is a bigger mess.
 
Netflix just shelled out over $200 million a pop for Knives Out sequels. I'm fairly certain, even with the profit margin of the first, the sequels aren't bringing in that kind of profit margin. The budget is the least of my concerns. I think calling more ambitious than any other film made is placing it on a pedestal that it really doesn't belong on.

And the only reason we haven't seen anything Robotech related is because the rights issues are literal landmine. I think only Godzilla 1985 is a bigger mess.

I don't think it's an exaggeration. Also Knives Out is at least a proven commodity. And it's also more contemporary material that has a wider audience than something like Gundam.

Gundam is a Japanese anime with a more specific segmented fanbase. Gundam could maybe cost twice as much as a Knives Out film if not more.

As for Robotech, the whole rights issue with Harmony Gold and Big West just got resolved. They've been developing a Robotech film for over 10 years though with little to no movement.

Not to mention, Robotech hasn't really been a relevant property since the 1980s. Even in the 1980s, Robotech wasn't that popular. It never got more than the one season that was commissioned.
 
Best way to succeed is to adapt Gundam Wing. It has some of the most iconic Gundams to date and it's something any millennial who watched Toonami will instantly gravitate to.

The story was also pretty cool, I'm sure they could tighten up vs what the anime had for it, but the themes and elements of it were solid.
 
Best way to succeed is to adapt Gundam Wing. It has some of the most iconic Gundams to date and it's something any millennial who watched Toonami will instantly gravitate to.

The story was also pretty cool, I'm sure they could tighten up vs what the anime had for it, but the themes and elements of it were solid.



I like Gundam Wing, but I still can't stand Heero Yuy.

"I'll kill you."

*Swoon* "What kind of person is he?!"

Not a better love story than Twilight?
 
My boy:

tumblr_nuql9a2xaz1rjxyrgo2_500.gifv
 

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