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That children's song/nursery rhyme you thought was nice...yeah..its NOT!

knowsbleed

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As a child, how often did you pay attention to the actual lyrics of a song or nursery rhyme? Most of the time, its just the harmony that children memorize. But as you get older, you start to realize, "Hey...that's a pretty messed up song". So here's a few gems that pretty much changed my perspective on innocence.

There was an old lady...

Ring around the "rosies"

You are my sunshine ...my wife pointed out that its actually a sad song and that when it was originally written, it was not intended to be a children's song.

Alouette ...cute song...about killing a bird


feel free to contribute more childhood memory shattering pieces.
 
Its Not Just Nursery Rhymes That Old Cartoon Captain Pugwush Was Filthy And The Power Rangers Does Have Slight Racist Undertones
 
now my brain hurts.

No punctuation marks make knowsbleed a sad boy.
 
I think that's why I loved them so much, because they were so dark and disturbing.
 
Its Not Just Nursery Rhymes That Old Cartoon Captain Pugwush Was Filthy And The Power Rangers Does Have Slight Racist Undertones

  1. Work on your grammar and punctuation shortcomings.
  2. The stories about Captain Pugwash are just an urban legend.
  3. You think every thing's racist as far as I can tell.
 
You forgot to add Rock-a-bye-baby on your list.

It's not just nursery rhymes but fairy tales are scary and dark and twisted too. :up:
 
Its Not Just Nursery Rhymes That Old Cartoon Captain Pugwush Was Filthy And The Power Rangers Does Have Slight Racist Undertones

disappointment.gif


:p
 
original fairy tales were very dark and sexual. In the Brother's Grimm "Little Red Riding Hood" he eats the grandma, leaves parts of her around the house for Riding Hood to collect, makes her get naked, get into bed with him, and eats her. There is no hunter that saves them
 
original fairy tales were very dark and sexual. In the Brother's Grimm "Little Red Riding Hood" he eats the grandma, leaves parts of her around the house for Riding Hood to collect, makes her get naked, get into bed with him, and eats her. There is no hunter that saves them
The original Grimm versions of fairy tales were pretty hard core. Like how Cinderella's step-sisters cut off their heels and big toes to try to fit in that (non-glass) shoe.
 
You forgot to add Rock-a-bye-baby on your list.

It's not just nursery rhymes but fairy tales are scary and dark and twisted too. :up:

That's the first thing I thought of when I saw the thread.
 
The original Grimm versions of fairy tales were pretty hard core. Like how Cinderella's step-sisters cut off their heels and big toes to try to fit in that (non-glass) shoe.

And Cinderella has the step mother killed....:wow:
 
ooooops......
 
If I remember my Snow White correctly, the Prince's kiss didn't wake the girl up; the dwarfs dropped her coffin, effectively performing a Ghetto Heimlich, popping the apple piece out of her throat. Then Snow forced the Queen to to dance at their wedding... in iron shoes recently smithed, and still blisteringly hot.
 
original fairy tales were very dark and sexual. In the Brother's Grimm "Little Red Riding Hood" he eats the grandma, leaves parts of her around the house for Riding Hood to collect, makes her get naked, get into bed with him, and eats her. There is no hunter that saves them

Actually you're thinking of the pre-Grimm version. :ninja:

The tale's history

[edit] Pre-Perrault

Although no written forms of the tale predate Perrault,[3] the origins of the Little Red Riding Hood story can be traced to oral versions from various European countries and more than likely preceding the 17th century, of which several exist, some significantly different from the currently-known, Grimms-inspired version. It was told by French peasants in the 14th century as well as in Italy, where a number of versions exist, including La finta nonna (The False Grandmother). [4] It is also possible that this early tale has roots in very similar Oriental tales (e.g. "Grandaunt Tiger"). [5]

These early variations of the tale differ from the currently known version in several ways. The antagonist is not always a wolf, but sometimes an ogre or a ‘bzou’ (werewolf), making these tales relevant to the werewolf-trials (similar to witch trials) of the time (e.g. the trial of Peter Stumpp).[6] The wolf usually leaves the grandmother’s blood and meat for the girl to eat, who then unwittingly cannibalises her own grandmother. Furthermore, the wolf was also known to ask her to remove her clothing and toss it into the fire. [7]Also, once the girl is in bed with the wolf she sees through his disguise and tries to escape, complaining to her ‘grandmother’ that she needs to defecate and would not wish to do so in the bed. The wolf reluctantly lets her go, tied to a piece of string so she does not get away. However, the girl slips the string over something else and gets away.

It has been noted that in these stories she escapes with no help from any male or older female figure, but instead utilises her own cunning.

[edit] Charles Perrault
French images, like this 19th century painting, show the much shorter red chaperon being worn
French images, like this 19th century painting, show the much shorter red chaperon being worn

The earliest known printed version was known as Le Petit Chaperon Rouge and had its origins in 17th century French folklore. It was included in the collection Tales and Stories of the Past with Morals. Tales of Mother Goose (Histoires et contes du temps passé, avec des moralités. Contes de ma mère l'Oye), in 1697, by Charles Perrault. As the title implies, this version [8] is both more sinister and more overtly moralized than the later ones. The redness of the hood, which has been given symbolic significance in many interpretations of the tale, was a detail introduced by Perrault.[9]

The story had as its subject an "attractive, well-bred young lady", a village girl of the country being deceived into giving a wolf she encountered the information he needed to find her grandmother's house successfully and eat the old woman while at the same time avoiding being noticed by woodcutters working in the nearby forest. Then he proceeded to lay a trap for the Red Riding Hood. The latter ends up eaten by the wolf and there the story ends. The wolf emerges the victor of the encounter and there is no happy ending.

Charles Perrault explained the 'moral' at the end so that no doubt is left to his intended meaning:

From this story one learns that children, especially young lasses, pretty, courteous and well-bred, do very wrong to listen to strangers, And it is not an unheard thing if the Wolf is thereby provided with his dinner. I say Wolf, for all wolves are not of the same sort; there is one kind with an amenable disposition — neither noisy, nor hateful, nor angry, but tame, obliging and gentle, following the young maids in the streets, even into their homes. Alas! Who does not know that these gentle wolves are of all such creatures the most dangerous!

In this version the tale has been adapted for late 17th century French salon culture, an entirely different audience from what it had before, and has become a harsh morality tale warning women of the advances of men.
 
original fairy tales were very dark and sexual. In the Brother's Grimm "Little Red Riding Hood" he eats the grandma, leaves parts of her around the house for Riding Hood to collect, makes her get naked, get into bed with him, and eats her. There is no hunter that saves them

I think the hunter still saves them, depending on what version of the tale you read. I think it was Perrault (the guy who made LRRH famous before the Grimm brothers) who first came up with the idea of the wolf actually surviving.
 
Does anyone remember:
The worms crawl in, the worms crawl out,
In your belly and out your mouth --
[var.] The worms play pinochle on your snout?

joy

and the rest...I think. I heard it somewhere...

Did you ever think as the hearse drove by,
You might be the next to die?
They'd gather you up in a long white sheet
And bury you [something] about six feet --
You'd be all right for a couple of weeks,
Then the coffin would start to leak
 
If I remember my Snow White correctly, the Prince's kiss didn't wake the girl up; the dwarfs dropped her coffin, effectively performing a Ghetto Heimlich, popping the apple piece out of her throat. Then Snow forced the Queen to to dance at their wedding... in iron shoes recently smithed, and still blisteringly hot.

Yep that's true but you missed the most important part. She had to dance until she died.
 
Never heard the whole thing but yes.

I always think to hold my breath when passing a cemetery, I don't what the **** you're suppose to do when you go to a funeral. :csad:
 
Never heard the whole thing but yes.

I always think to hold my breath when passing a cemetery, I don't what the **** you're suppose to do when you go to a funeral. :csad:

Ha...I used to be scared to flick off a cemetery for fear of my middle finger falling off.
 

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