The Soap Opera Effect - Love it or Hate it?

Discussion in 'Misc. Films' started by Destructus86, May 2, 2013.

  1. Destructus86 Registered

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    So, when the Hobbit was first released we were given a few choices. The biggest being the traditional film speed and the high speed film versions. This was all new to me...at least until I finally upgraded my TV and it had the ability to do what we all call "the soap opera effect" I am not going to go into the details as I believe most of us here already know what it is.

    My question is...do you like this new "technical progress" or hate this "abomination?" :)

    Personally, I absolutely hate it. It makes movies and shows appear cheap and low budget.
     
  2. Eddie Dean Jokerfied

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    It's the worst damn thing in the world.
     
  3. Octoberist point blank

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    it makes all that hard work look cheap and unsettling.
     
  4. Mondragon My other Avi is Gaucho Mickey

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    I'd prefer if instead of artificially filling in frames, this feature was a button that zoomed in and froze on a melodramatic expressions while forcing the music to swell!
     
    #4 Mondragon, May 2, 2013
    Last edited: May 2, 2013
  5. Lighthouse Fairness, Equality, Bacon

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    The big problem is that the effect removes the suspension of disbelief that is required for all movie going experiences(except for documentaries, where I think this process might actually work). Instead of saying "Oh, it's the Shire." it's "Oh, its a movie set."
     
  6. Figs Registered

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    The only time 120Hz won't annoy most people is when watching sports. It gives you more of a feeling of being there.

    As for films, I don't care either way anymore. The first time I saw a movie on an HDTV at my friends house, he had the TV set to 120Hz and it bugged my wife and I. Sometime after I got my own HDTV, we tried watching a few movies like that and eventually we didn't notice it anymore. It looked and felt like watching a movie when your TV is set at 60Hz. I guess it's nice once you adjust to it because you don't notice it anymore and you also get a smoother picture.
     
  7. redhawk23 Wrestlin'

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    I really hated it for the hobbit. TV's that do it artificially are absolutely terrible especially the display models in stores when they play animated films.
     
  8. Octoberist point blank

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    The problem too is that 24 frames, or even 30 frames 'filters' an illusion of the film's reality, making it believable ironically, where as 48 or 60 frames shows the reality and that trigger something in the brain, leading you to question the tangibility of the sets, costumes or make-up.
     
  9. Tequilla Registered

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    Depends

    If it is a stylistic choice regarding the shutter speed...i embrace it.

    If it is a crappy interpolation....burn it with fire.
     
  10. matrix_ghost movie fan

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    If said it before and i'll say it again.
    Considering the "real" look at Michael Mann is currently going for with his movies , HFR is the way to go for him.
     
  11. Tacit Ronin Registered

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    Then the sets and costumes and props will have to improve, just as they had to after color photography.
     

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