Time for a new black panther ongoing from marvel?

Discussion in 'Black Panther World' started by Silvermoth, Oct 31, 2014.

  1. Silvermoth Avenger

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2006
    Messages:
    19,446
    Likes Received:
    3,050
    I think it's definitely time for a new ongoing. I think the reason they haven't done it yet is because they didn't want to stomp on what Hickman was planning for new avengers but it's definitely time to start talking about a new series.

    Who would you choose as the creative team? I have no idea who could be the writer but epting would be an amazing artist for it
     
  2. MakeMinesMarvel Registered

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2013
    Messages:
    2,450
    Likes Received:
    0
    If a new ongoing starts in January then it'd have atleast 23 issuses by tbe time TBP comes out. We need someone who'll right a cool take on tbe character so he has a Winter Solider type arc to draw from for tbe sequel.
     
  3. DarKush Registered

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2006
    Messages:
    1,755
    Likes Received:
    0
    I definitely hope they do another Panther ongoing. I enjoyed Priest and Hudlin, Maberry's pre-DoomWar work, and felt Liss's Panther arc was hamstrung by the premise more than the writing. I'm iffy on Hickman. Not sure where he's going, and right now not sure if I want him writing a Panther solo, but if that what it takes to get the character back in his own book and if Hickman can respect the character then so be it.
     
  4. MbJ Registered

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2014
    Messages:
    19,411
    Likes Received:
    5,827
    Is Christopher Priest still retired?
     
  5. eon001 Registered

    Joined:
    May 4, 2013
    Messages:
    1,736
    Likes Received:
    353
    They should consider an animated show too, or at least have him feature in Avengers Assemble.
     
  6. Silvermoth Avenger

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2006
    Messages:
    19,446
    Likes Received:
    3,050
    Yeah, the other animated series they made for black panther was pretty cool so I definitely wouldn't mind another one.
     
  7. OnTheAir Wakandan Ambassador

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2011
    Messages:
    4,852
    Likes Received:
    337
  8. Mike Murdock Registered

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2014
    Messages:
    10,718
    Likes Received:
    378
    Does announcing something they haven't announced yet count as announcing it?
     
  9. OnTheAir Wakandan Ambassador

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2011
    Messages:
    4,852
    Likes Received:
    337
    [​IMG]

    Hey, I simply said said it's "on the way." :woot: Some fans I spoke with were concerned after BP wasn't included in Marvel's initial announcement of 45 new titles.
     
  10. OnTheAir Wakandan Ambassador

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2011
    Messages:
    4,852
    Likes Received:
    337
    From the New York Times:

    Ta-Nehisi Coates to Write Black Panther Comic for Marvel

    [​IMG]

    The cover of Black Panther No. 1, to be published next year, drawn by Brian Stelfreeze.

    MARVEL ENTERTAINMENT
    By GEORGE GENE GUSTINES
    SEPTEMBER 22, 2015

    Ta-Nehisi Coates can be identified in many ways: as a national correspondent for The Atlantic, as an author and, as of this month, as a nominee for the National Book Award’s nonfiction prize. But Mr. Coates also has a not-so-secret identity, as evidenced by some of his Atlantic blog posts and his Twitter feed: Marvel Comics superfan.

    So it seems only natural that Marvel has asked Mr. Coates to take on a new Black Panther series set to begin next spring. Writing for that comics publisher is a childhood dream that, despite the seeming incongruity, came about thanks to his day job. “The Atlantic is a pretty diverse place in terms of interest, but there are no comics nerds,” besides himself, Mr. Coates said in an interview.

    His passions intersected in May, during the magazine’s New York Ideas seminar, he interviewed Sana Amanat, a Marvel editor, about diversity and inclusion in comic books. Ms. Amanat led the creation of the new Ms. Marvel, a teenage Muslim girl living in Jersey City, based on some of her own childhood experiences.

    “It was a fruitful discussion,” he recalled.

    [​IMG]
    Ta-Nehisi Coates
    GABRIELLA DEMCZUK FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES

    After that event, Marvel reached out, paired Mr. Coates with an editor, and discussions about the comic began. The renewed focus on Black Panther is no surprise. Created in 1966, he is the first black superhero and hails from Wakanda, a fictional African country.

    “He has the baddest costume in comics and is a dude who is smarter and better than everyone,” said Axel Alonso, the editor in chief of Marvel. The character not only adds to the diversity of Marvel’s comics; he will do it for their films too: Black Panther is set to make his big-screen debut next year in “Captain America: Civil War,” followed by a solo feature in 2018.

    At first glance, it may seem odd for Mr. Coates to write a mainstream superhero comic. He has been lauded for his book “Between the World and Me,” a passionate letter to his son on being black in America. But he does not see anything odd about it. “I don’t experience the stuff I write about as weighty,” he said. “I feel a strong need to express something. The writing usually lifts the weight. I expect to be doing the same thing for Marvel.”

    “A Nation Under Our Feet,” the yearlong story line written by Mr. Coates and drawn by Brian Stelfreeze, is inspired by the 2003 book of the same title by Steven Hahn. It will find the hero dealing with a violent uprising in his country set off by a superhuman terrorist group called the People. “It’s going to be a story that repositions the Black Panther in the minds of readers,” Mr. Alonso said. “It really moves him forward.”

    [​IMG]
    A variant cover of the first issue, also drawn by Brian Stelfreeze, inspired by Jay Z's "The Black Album."
    MARVEL ENTERTAINMENT

    Mr. Coates’s enthusiasm for Marvel started when he was a boy. Marvel was “an intimate part of my childhood and, at this point, part of my adulthood,” he said. “It was mostly through pop culture, through hip-hop, through Dungeons & Dragons and comic books that I acquired much of my vocabulary.”

    Mr. Coates, 39, began reading comics in the mid-1980s and was introduced to three minority characters: Storm, the leader of the X-Men; Monica Rambeau, who had taken on the name Captain Marvel; and James Rhodes, who was Iron Man. “They were obviously black,” he recalled, but it was not made into a big deal. Still, he said: “I’m sure it meant something to see people who looked like me in comic books. It was this beautiful place that I felt pop culture should look like.”

    Diversity — in characters and creators — is a drumbeat to which the comic book industry is increasingly trying to march. Marvel recently announced the December start of “The Totally Awesome Hulk,” whose title character is Amadeus Cho, a genius Korean-American scientist who will find himself transforming into that emerald behemoth. The book is written by Greg Pak and drawn by Frank Cho, both of whom are Korean-American. (“My wife is Korean, so I scored massive points,” Mr. Alonso said.)

    Over at DC, Cyborg, who is black, is starring in his own series (and a film in 2020), and Beth Ross is the first female (and teenage) commander in chief in the biting satire “Prez.” This month Image Comics released “Virgil,” a graphic novel by Steve Orlando and J. D. Faith, about a black, gay cop in the not-so-inclusive Kingston, in Jamaica. “Showing different faces under the masks is very important for everyone,” Mr. Alonso said.

    But it all begins with the quality of the story, and Mr. Coates is ecstatic for the challenge. This writing assignment was not about “trying to please 12-year-old me,” he said. Another inspiration, he added, is the work of Jonathan Hickman on “Secret Wars” and “the depth he’s able to get from characters.”

    “You don’t come in off the board and come in at that level,” he said of Mr. Hickman’s work. “But it helps to want it to be great. I want to make a great comic. I really, really do.”

    http://mobile.nytimes.com/2015/09/2...-panther-comic-for-marvel.html?referrer=&_r=0
     
  11. Slick Yup

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2007
    Messages:
    4,108
    Likes Received:
    346
  12. Mike Murdock Registered

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2014
    Messages:
    10,718
    Likes Received:
    378
    Interesting. Just skimmed that, but it seems like an interesting story idea. Almost Panther's Rage in its approach to T'Challa.
     
  13. OnTheAir Wakandan Ambassador

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2011
    Messages:
    4,852
    Likes Received:
    337
    [​IMG]

    Ta-Nehisi Coates Takes on Black Panther

    The acclaimed writer teams with artist Brian Stelfreeze on an all-new direction for T'Challa!


    Marvel is excited to announce that next spring, one of the most thought-provoking and perceptive writers today, Ta-Nehisi Coates (“Between the World and Me”), along with legendary artist Brian Stelfreeze will helm a new BLACK PANTHER series, adding an exciting, erudite new voice to the All-New, All–Different Marvel lineup.

    The indomitable will of Wakanda—the famed African nation known for its vast wealth, advanced technology, and warrior traditions—has long been reflected in the will of its monarchs, the Black Panthers. But now, the current Black Panther, T’Challa, finds that will tested by a superhuman terrorist group called the People that has sparked a violent uprising among the citizens of Wakanda. T’Challa knows the country must change to survive—the question is, will the Black Panther survive the change?

    “Wakanda is really the light of the world, in the Marvel Universe. And yet it's a system of governance that has not advanced beyond the idea of blood-rule,” says Coates. “It’s always seemed to me that T’Challa was aware of this discrepancy. Among the monarchs of Marvel—Namor and Doctor Doom for instance—T’Challa has always been distinguished to me by his discomfort on the throne, and with the problems of one-man rule. I am very much looking forward to exploring that tension.”

    That tension and conflict is what will fire BLACK PANTHER into a no-holds-barred adventure that will demonstrate why Black Panther is one of the most powerful heroes in the Marvel Universe.

    “Ta-Nehisi writes brilliantly about everything from race to politics to fatherhood to modern culture, but he’s also a longtime Marvel reader. And combining his writing skills with his passion for and understanding of Marvel’s characters, paired with the captivating and engaging artwork of modern master Brian Stelfreeze, has led to a truly amazing story that we can’t wait for the world to read,” says Wil Moss, editor of the new BLACK PANTHER series. “This story will have all the political intrigue of the best episodes of 'The West Wing' and 'Homeland,' but it’s also going to have the trademark Marvel action and energy that Stan Lee and Jack Kirby—Black Panther’s creators!—built into the foundation of the Marvel Universe. Look for some fun and unexpected Marvel villains to show up in this story, as well as an appearance or two by T’Challa’s new teammates, the Ultimates.”

    Join us next year as Marvel continues to change the creative landscape of the comic book industry when Ta-Nehisi Coates and Brian Stelfreeze make history as the new creative team on Marvel Comics’ BLACK PANTHER.

    http://marvel.com/news/comics/25144/ta-nehisi_coates_takes_on_black_panther?linkId=17266551
     
  14. OnTheAir Wakandan Ambassador

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2011
    Messages:
    4,852
    Likes Received:
    337
    [​IMG]

    BLACK PANTHER GETS AN ALL-STAR TEAM IN 2016

    Ta-Nehisi Coates and Brian Stelfreeze speak on their huge plans for the King of Wakanda!

    Last week, the comics world exploded with the news of Ta-Nehisi Coates and Brian Stelfreeze being added to the All-New, All-Different roster as they take the creative helm behind BLACK PANTHER in 2016.

    A National Book Award nominee and recent MacArthur Genius Grant recipient, Coates will make his comic writing debut learning the ropes from veteran artist Stelfreeze and Marvel editor Wil Moss. Without a doubt, this marks one of many instances where Marvel looks to expand its pool of creative talents and stories.
    We took some time to talk with both Coates and Stelfreeze about their upcoming collaboration, what it means to them to be working on BLACK PANTHER, and what they think it will mean for readers worldwide.

    Marvel.com: Ever since the notice went out about both of you being announced as the creative team behind the All-New, All-Different BLACK PANTHER series, there’s hardly a corner in social media that hasn’t been buzzing. What are your initial thoughts now that it’s public knowledge?

    Ta-Nehisi Coates: I’m sort of shocked by it all. One thing that’s amazed me is the sheer number of people who are—evidently—closet comic book fans. I mean people who I knew and interacted with in other domains who are now tweeting me like “Can’t wait for Black Panther!” And I’m like, “Dude, aren’t you a 42-year old housing policy wonk?”
    I shouldn’t be surprised though. Comics have long had that kind of reach.

    Brian Stelfreeze: I was crazy excited about the project from the moment I signed up, and it’s great to feel that sentiment reflected by the fans.* Black Panther fans tend to be passionate but quiet, and it takes an announcement like this to get them really making some noise. Even my mom called to congratulate me, and that’s a first.

    Marvel.com: Now, I understand the offer to steer BLACK PANTHER resulted from your discussion with Marvel’s Sana Amanat. Can you share some of the details of that discussion?

    Ta-Nehisi Coates: My conversation with Sana was short. I expressed some interest in pitching, but I wasn’t even sure she heard me, thinking about it now. We didn’t even talk that long about it. But clearly she heard me—or she had thoughts herself.

    Marvel.com: Brian, likewise, how exactly did you come on board to work on the series?

    Brian Stelfreeze: I’ve worked with editor Wil Moss before, and I’d recently finished the Black Panther hip-hop variant [cover]. The moment I finished the cover, he sent me an email to ask about my availability for a “special project.” Of course I was absolutely blown away when he mentioned it was BLACK PANTHER, and it went from a consideration to a necessity when he mentioned the writer.

    Marvel.com: Brian, you are absolutely no stranger to comics having been an artist in the industry for decades and worked on a variety of series with a host of companies and professionals. Can you talk a little bit about working with Ta-Nehisi on his first comics writing project?

    Brian Stelfreeze: I’m always a little nervous when someone comes from other media into writing comics. It’s a unique storytelling form and it requires both talent and respect. My nervousness dissolved when I received Ta-Nehisi’s story outline. It turns out he’s a true fan boy with a willingness to explore the depth and breadth of both the character and his world. His lack of time in the industry also gives him a lack of limitations, and I’m taking great joy in acting as a flashlight to illuminate the path for him and the readers.

    Marvel.com: Similarly, Ta-Nehisi, what’s it like working alongside one of the best in the business, like Brian?

    Ta-Nehisi Coates: To be honest, I’m just looking forward to learning from Brian. And I mean that. I’ve never done this before. Obviously I’m writing. But in terms of how you tell a story panel-for-panel is all new to me. I took this gig—above all—because I thought it would make me a better writer. And I really look forward to taking notes on that from Brian. He is an artist, but the basic task of trying to communicate information, or feeling, or action is the same.

    Marvel.com: Ta-Nehisi, your professional background seems to have you moving in a different trajectory than that of writing comics, between your critically acclaimed work in “The Atlantic” as well as your National Book Award-nominated nonfiction. *In what ways are your other experiences as a writer informing and aiding you in your work on BLACK PANTHER?

    Ta-Nehisi Coates: Well, I’ve been storytelling all of my life. It’s true that’s it been in nonfiction for most of my professional life, but the basics of trying to think about what makes for compelling story has been my trade for awhile. I think beyond that I bring some amount of knowledge to the basic questions that must—necessarily—occupy a guy like T’Challa. Having studied history, for instance, I have some sense of the challenges that face monarchs. The key is learning to pull from that, while at the same time making sure T’Challa has people to punch. It can’t be a dissertation.

    Marvel.com: Ta-Nehisi, you’ve mentioned how you’re more interested in the “interaction” between the reader and his or her imagination in the comics medium. I’m curious how both of you—especially you, Brian!—will be utilizing the medium to differentiate BLACK PANTHER from other Marvel titles and make this comic a “must read” experience for fans?

    Ta-Nehisi Coates: Oh man this is so hard to answer without giving anything away. I think what I can say is T’Challa will be immediately challenged and readers will see him pull from his best self to attempt to overcome. Ugh. I know that’s vague. I’m trying make sure plot doesn’t start spilling out my mouth.

    Brian Stelfreeze: Ta-Nehisi’s rhythm of storytelling is very different, and I like having to create new tools to capture those beats. This is not going to be a meat and potato comic book series, and I think the readers will enjoy the taste of something new.

    Marvel.com: Brian, what about this series has you excited from an artistic standpoint? Are there new challenges you are finding in telling T’Challa’s story and depicting his life in Wakanda?

    Brian Stelfreeze:I think an artist’s best work comes from when they are challenged and this series is filled with sweet challenges. Some aspects of what we know about both Black Panther and the nation of Wakanda are defined while others are under developed.* I think of it not so much as world building but bridge building.

    Marvel.com: Ta-Nehisi, we see the first arc is going to deal with T’Challa as the ruler of Wakanda and how he deals with a violent rebellion. In some regards, it does seem interesting that someone who is the monarch of a country would carry on a public pursuit of being a super hero. Wouldn’t these two roles be at odds with one another, with one being responsible for representing the law and maintaining order throughout it while the other often circumvents the law though achieving the greater good?

    Ta-Nehisi Coates: Yes it does. That’s all I can say. [Laughs]

    Marvel.com: Fair enough! As of late, there have been increased concerns about the level of diversity not just in terms of the characters in comics but also that of the creative teams. Do you see the work you’re about to embark upon as significant in this regard?

    Ta-Nehisi Coates: I do, but as a creator, it’s very hard to think that way for me. I just want to make a great book. If the book is awful, diversity will be irrelevant. I need this to be great, first and foremost.

    Brian Stelfreeze: I see every project I take on as significant, and I try to pour a life time of experience into it. Those life experiences may inform me in unique ways in regards to Black Panther. I try to place what I creatively have to say above who I am.

    Marvel.com: Already, there are many fans and commentators voicing a number of high expectations for this series. However, as storytellers—be it through writing or art—what are your expectations for yourselves as you work on BLACK PANTHER? What do you each hope to accomplish in your work on this title?

    Ta-Nehisi Coates: Greatness. It’s always the standard. Of course you don’t always get there, but it is the standard. It just has to be.

    Brian Stelfreeze: There is a profound gap between meeting a person and knowing a person and that holds true for the difference between visiting and residing. I want people to feel that they have bridged that gap by the end of the series. Ta-Nehisi’s story will make the reader a resident of Wakanda.

    Marvel.com: How do you think you’ll know if you’ve achieved those goals or met those expectations?

    Ta-Nehisi Coates: I think I’ll feel it. I think I’ll be satisfied, Brian will be satisfied, Wil will be satisfied and Marvel will be. And I think readers will be pleased.

    Brian Stelfreeze: Currently, all conversations about Black Panther deal with him as an idol. I’ll know we will be successful when I have my first conversation about T’Challa as a man.

    Marvel.com: The saying goes that if fans want diversity, they need to support diversity with their monetary votes. Aside from helping get another title published, what are some of the longer-term effects of fans supporting a comic like BLACK PANTHER?

    Ta-Nehisi Coates: It’s hard for me to answer that. Again, I’m really focused on making the book itself. I probably can answer this in a year.

    Brian Stelfreeze: I think diversity for diversity sake is low goal setting. The fans should not only demand diversity they should also demand greatness. Please hold us to this task.

    Marvel.com: You’ve both been incredibly generous with your time, so one last question: For someone on the fence as to whether or not this series is worth buying, how would you convince them to give it a shot?

    Ta-Nehisi Coates: Great hero. Great story. Great art. ‘Nuff said.

    Brian Stelfreeze: ‘Nuff said.

    Ta-Nehisi Coates and Brian Stelfreeze join BLACK PANTHER on the prowl in 2016!

    http://marvel.com/news/comics/25190/black_panther_gets_an_all-star_team_in_2016?linkId=17482233
     
  15. Mike Murdock Registered

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2014
    Messages:
    10,718
    Likes Received:
    378
    G. Willow Wilson (Ms. Marvel writer) has said that writing for comics is the hardest thing she's ever done. There are so many subtle things you take for granted - such as making sure a big reveal isn't on the same page or set of pages as the build up because it'll ruin the surprise. That being said, Coates is saying all the right things and I'm sure he'll have help getting his feet under him. Because of the hype surrounding this, I've stepped up my time table for reading all of Black Panther so far. I hope to be caught up to date and can make this a regular story I read.
     
  16. E-Man Cooler than your daddy.

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2009
    Messages:
    14,173
    Likes Received:
    0
    This is pretty much how I feel about this announcement. I want nothing more than for Coates to write a great Black Panther story, and I am going to give him a shot to do so because he hasn't even shown that he can't write a killer T'Challa. But what some of the more antagonistic and whiny members of the Black Panther fanbase don't get is that goes both ways, and some skepticism is warranted. We really don't know how he's going to do because writing comics is a different beast than writing essays for a newspaper. Do I have faith that he can write well? Sure I do, but it's not a given that he's automatically going to knock it out the park because he won awards that isn't related to comics. That's like expecting great comic writers to just walk into writing great movie scripts. While I'm sure some can do it, it's still not a given until we see it done because they're different worlds.

    Funny enough some of the same people getting uptight about any skepticism regarding Coates were the same people who hate Jonathan Maberry for the end of Doomwar with a passion, yet conveniently don't remember "calling out the haters" for questioning Maberry when it was announced that he would write Black Panther. They went on and on about how awesome this would be, and that the "haters" were going to be mad, and then by the end of Doomwar their asses turned sour on him. I love Black Panther, but like with Spider-man and Batman there are parts of his fanbase that are annoying as hell.

    For the record I'm excited because it sounds like a good story, and I want it to be as great as the best Panther runs. At the same time I'm a little worried that Coates might have needed to get an indie comic story under his belt so that he gets used to writing the medium. Time will tell how good this ends up being.
     
  17. Mike Murdock Registered

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2014
    Messages:
    10,718
    Likes Received:
    378
    FWIW, there have been some writers who have done a spectacular job when changing mediums (JMS for Spider-Man, for example). Others did OK, but flawed work (such as Kevin Smith for Daredevil). This is different because he's never even written fiction, but I'm surprisingly less worried about that. A comic book fan with a story idea and a passion and dedication to carry it out can go quite far.
     
  18. Donald Thomas The Black ArachKnight

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2002
    Messages:
    4,801
    Likes Received:
    25
    Aloha,
    The single most important thing to me for any comic book writer is that they are a comic book fan who actually knows the character. If anything, Coates may take a C Preist approach.
    BTW- I have a Black Panther an site that includes all volumes of the character. Check me out at http://www.donaldspidermanthomas.com/html/library_limited_page11.html
    Spidey rules except in Wakanda
     
  19. RockSP MYTH SMITH ˆž∞!!!

    Joined:
    May 11, 2003
    Messages:
    15,413
    Likes Received:
    9,326
  20. E-Man Cooler than your daddy.

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2009
    Messages:
    14,173
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dammit, RSP! You beat me to it! I was just about to post that article Coates wrote. I like what Coates is saying so far. With his lack of fiction experience I'm in a pure wait-and-see mode, but I do like how he's breaking things down so far. Time will tell how the execution goes, but I like that he's really trying to organize things properly so that he can improve upon things. Stelfreeze's art also adds to it since we know he's got some serious skill. Can't wait to read the new ongoing.
     
  21. OnTheAir Wakandan Ambassador

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2011
    Messages:
    4,852
    Likes Received:
    337
  22. OnTheAir Wakandan Ambassador

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2011
    Messages:
    4,852
    Likes Received:
    337
    [​IMG]

    Black Panther Prowls in April 2016

    See Alex Ross' cover and hear from the editor of the upcoming series!

    The day fast approaches! In April 2016, King T’Challa returns to the pages of his own ongoing series, BLACK PANTHER, written by Ta-Nehisi Coates with art by Brian Stelfreeze.

    “Ta-Nehisi, Brian, colorist Laura Martin, letterer Joe Sabino, assistant editor Chris Robinson, and I have been working on this series for months already, so we’re happy to have a launch date as we’re all anxious to start getting this book out in front of people,” says series editor Wil Moss. “We may be biased, but we think it’s something pretty special!

    “And what better way to celebrate the launch than with a variant cover by the legendary Alex Ross, sporting a logo designed by Rian Hughes? Alex’s art is known for making characters feel ‘real,’ which perfectly fits the tone of this series, as Ta-Nehisi and Brian are presenting a very ‘real’ take on Black Panther and Wakanda, one blended with the epic, unpredictable scope that the Marvel Universe is known for.

    “So mark your calendars: King T’Challa returns in April!”

    [​IMG]
    1 of 2 Black Panther (2016) #1 variant cover by Alex Ross

    [​IMG]

    BLACK PANTHER #1

    Written by TA-NEHISI COATES

    Penciled by BRIAN STELFREEZE

    Cover by BRIAN STELFREEZE

    Variant Cover by ALEX ROSS

    A new era for the Black Panther starts here!

    Written by MacArthur Genius and National Book Award winner Ta-Nehisi Coates (“Between the World and Me”) and illustrated by living legend Brian Stelfreeze, “A Nation Under Our Feet” is a story about dramatic upheaval in Wakanda and the Black Panther’s struggle to do right by his people as their ruler.

    The indomitable will of Wakanda—the famed African nation known for its vast wealth, advanced technology, and warrior traditions—has long been reflected in the will of its monarchs, the Black Panthers. *

    But now the current Black Panther, T’Challa, finds that will tested by a superhuman terrorist group called the People that has sparked a violent uprising among the citizens of Wakanda. *T’Challa knows the country must change to survive—the question is, will the Black Panther survive the change?

    40 PGS./Rated T …$4.99
On Sale in April!

    http://marvel.com/news/comics/25561/black_panther_prowls_in_april_2016#ixzz3uQOKATw8
     
  23. OnTheAir Wakandan Ambassador

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2011
    Messages:
    4,852
    Likes Received:
    337
  24. OnTheAir Wakandan Ambassador

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2011
    Messages:
    4,852
    Likes Received:
    337
  25. RockSP MYTH SMITH ˆž∞!!!

    Joined:
    May 11, 2003
    Messages:
    15,413
    Likes Received:
    9,326
    He did some Quantum & Woody for the new Valiant comics, and is supposedly involved with the Milestone revival.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice
monitoring_string = "afb8e5d7348ab9e99f73cba908f10802"