What did Christopher Nolan think of the other Batman movies?

Discussion in 'Batman World' started by Lord, Jul 27, 2011.

  1. The Joker

    The Joker The Clown Prince of Crime

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2003
    Messages:
    49,532
    Likes Received:
    85
    I always love reading what others have to say about different interpretations of Batman. I recently saw what Batman comic book legend, Denny O'Neill, said about Nolan's movies:

    http://www.comicbookresources.com/?page=article&id=18114
     
    #76
  2. Comics N' Toons

    Comics N' Toons Viva La Revolucion!

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2007
    Messages:
    3,015
    Likes Received:
    0
    Well, while Nolan may be a matter of personal taste, no one can argue with Denny. I dare you to try.
     
    #77
  3. JohnnyGobbs

    JohnnyGobbs Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2009
    Messages:
    161
    Likes Received:
    0
    Sorry, did I read that right? Did Nolan just state that Burton's first Batman wasn't epic? WTF! It was more 'epic' than Batman Begins...The clash between the Joker and Batman, the creators of each other's respective identities was more epic for a start.

    Burton and Keaton have both been very gracious with respect to Nolan's Batman films. It's a pity posh-boy couldn't reciprocate that respect.
     
    #78
  4. GothamAlleys

    GothamAlleys Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1,799
    Likes Received:
    0
    Im not sure whether I disagree with Nolan or did he worded it wrong. I strongly disagree that people of Gotham are as bizarre as Batman or the city. I see regular people filling the streets, at least in B89 (Ill give him Max Shreck). The city's design itself is indeed a character on its own, reflecting the evil and darkness of its citizens. But not the people.

    After so many similar comments, it seems Nolan's simply a hardcore Superman movie fan rather than Batman fan (he said himself he wasnt into Batman comics that much but liked the character), so his vision was always that of redoing STM with batman in it. That would match with his comments about "his" Batman and his dream Batman 79 which never happened. I dont think a movie that doesnt show origins isnt valid at all, Vader or Phantom of the Opera didnt need them. They just needed a spot in the movie to briefly recall their backstory

    Either way, for me Begins is far superior to S78, and outside of them bnoth showing an entire life of the character in its structure, I dont see other similarities, which for me personally is a good thing
     
    #79
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2012
  5. AnneFan

    AnneFan Hathaway #1

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2011
    Messages:
    22,051
    Likes Received:
    3
    I transcribed everything you see up there word for word.

    Edit: Oh, you're referring to Nolan?
     
    #80
  6. GothamAlleys

    GothamAlleys Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1,799
    Likes Received:
    0
    Yeah, I meant Nolan
     
    #81
  7. El Payaso

    El Payaso Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2005
    Messages:
    15,263
    Likes Received:
    0
    Yeah, because Batman and Superman are so much alike it's only natural they should be approached the same way? And I'm sorry, Nolan, but B89 was epic.

    It can be done both ways.

    But my impression is that Batman was an extraordinary figure in B89 and he should have been more of that in Nolan's movies, visually-wise.
     
    #82
  8. The Joker

    The Joker The Clown Prince of Crime

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2003
    Messages:
    49,532
    Likes Received:
    85
    Even if I could I wouldn't, because I agree with every word he said :cwink:
     
    #83
  9. GothamAlleys

    GothamAlleys Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1,799
    Likes Received:
    0
    As far as Denny, I agree as well, He states both that Nolan CREATED how OWN universe and take, and that its great. And that I agree with. No "Nolan is the only faithful one" BS, no "Nolan is the ONLY legitimate Batman moviemaker" bs, just stating how it is, at least for me
     
    #84
  10. Comics N' Toons

    Comics N' Toons Viva La Revolucion!

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2007
    Messages:
    3,015
    Likes Received:
    0
    That's the thing though... Denny is a writer and editor and he's retired so he has no allegiance to DC anymore which frees him up to tell it like it is.

    There may also be a bit of ego on the man's part as well as his SIGNATURE creation was used in Nolan's first film.

    I also think your preference for a certain Bat-film will have a lot to do with what era of Batman comics you love and respect the most. If you love the 70's & 80's O'neil/Wein/Conway/Moench etc. stories, you may enjoy Batman 89 or Batman Forever more.

    If you love the 90's Batman comics you may love Returns more and so on!

    And god help you if you love the 50's and 60's Batman because then the Clooney travesty might be to your taste!
     
    #85
  11. Cain

    Cain I Heart Amazons

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2005
    Messages:
    6,011
    Likes Received:
    0
    I could see that. I grew up on those books as well as the ones by Grant, Wolfman, Englehart etc. and I have a great appreciation for those movies I suppose because of that.

    If we're talking Moench/Jones era stuff here then yeah. It captures the surreal tone of those books pretty well.

    I love the silver age Batman and still hate the **** out of that movie for the most part. Though the Wayne manor scenes are all pretty much excellent. The Batman stuff is way too overdone for it's own good and very phoned in.

    None of the charm and genuine wit of say the TV series starring West for instance creeps into that movie at any time during those moments. Again I give them credit on the whole Bruce and Alfred's relationship as surrogate father and son stuff. As well as the "Dick wants to be his own man and conflicts with Bruce" thing as it's always been a cool angle to me in the comics but that's about it.
     
    #86
  12. TruerToTheCore

    TruerToTheCore Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2008
    Messages:
    2,936
    Likes Received:
    0
    The stuff you are referencing here is mostly from Denny O'Neil. He was the writer who was into that (as someone put it) "thuganomics" stuff - the (unnecessary) violence like knocking out Talia with a bare fist or using lethal force against animals and the "hard boiled detective" talk. Although Denny O'Neil's Batman was really just playing the role of the hard-ass, it's not like he was shown to be truly like that.

    Writers like Robbins, Haney, Wein and especially David V. Reed rarely let Batman do this stuff and more often went the "plot" thing, you know, letting Batman actually figuring out something by detective work instead of intimidation.
     
    #87
  13. GothamAlleys

    GothamAlleys Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1,799
    Likes Received:
    0
    I think its fair to say he did both (like Bale), but the point here was that Batman was intimidating in those days as well and still had a lot of ager in him and a fury that could make any man crumble. For me this hidden anger that he sometimes cant fully control is the core of the character. Well, at least in most of his iterations
     
    #88
  14. TruerToTheCore

    TruerToTheCore Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2008
    Messages:
    2,936
    Likes Received:
    0
    But in this pic it isn't "hidden anger", he is rather acting like that to intimidate the thug.

    Of course, some writers approached Batman like you wrote, Len Wein and also Mike W. Barr made him rather passionate and angry. Frank Miller for example already wrote the opposite: A very cold and calculating crime-fighting machine, especially in "Year One".
     
    #89
  15. GothamAlleys

    GothamAlleys Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1,799
    Likes Received:
    0
    What I meant by hidden is that he keeps it inside and sometimes it comes out or he intentionally lets it out, boiling like water, a pure rage. And sometimes he lets himself go too much. This is very much in vein with what Bale portrayed

    As far as Year One he was a rookie there
     
    #90
  16. Godzilla2014

    Godzilla2014 Deadpan Snarker

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2009
    Messages:
    6,844
    Likes Received:
    0
    What I mean by grounded is that, even things we naturally expect to see in a Batman film, are justified within the story. Even the Batsuit is given a reason to be other than, "it's a Batman film", which really lends credibility to the whole thing within a heightened reality.
     
    #91
  17. GothamAlleys

    GothamAlleys Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1,799
    Likes Received:
    0
  18. The Joker

    The Joker The Clown Prince of Crime

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2003
    Messages:
    49,532
    Likes Received:
    85
    What's the new Burton one?
     
    #93
  19. GothamAlleys

    GothamAlleys Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1,799
    Likes Received:
    0
    Where he says his version is lighthearted in comparison to Nolan, I didnt have that one before
     
    #94
  20. Elevator Man

    Elevator Man Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2010
    Messages:
    3,726
    Likes Received:
    0
    LOL BR is far from "lighthearted" even compare to Nolan's trilogy.
     
    #95
  21. Senator Pleasury

    Senator Pleasury Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 26, 2013
    Messages:
    2,844
    Likes Received:
    0
    The tone, sure. But Burton went as far as he could considering in was the 80's.
     
    #96
  22. Hordakfan

    Hordakfan Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2011
    Messages:
    761
    Likes Received:
    0
    And did you know Burton and Schumacher loved Nolan's movies?
     
    #97

Share This Page

monitoring_string = "afb8e5d7348ab9e99f73cba908f10802"