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Snakes Are Taking Over

JohnRico

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As climate change warms the nation, giant Burmese pythons could colonize one-third of the USA, from San Francisco across the Southwest, Texas and the South and up north along the Virginia coast, according to U.S. Geological Survey maps released Wednesday.

The pythons can be 20 feet long and 250 pounds. They are highly adaptable to new environments.

Two federal agencies - the USGS and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - are investigating the range of nine invasive snakes in Florida, concerned about the danger they now pose to endangered species. The agencies are collecting data to aid in the control of these populations.

They examined Burmese pythons first and, based on where they live in Asia, estimated where they might live here. One map shows where the pythons could live today, an area that expands when scientists use global warming models for 2100.

"We were surprised by the map. It was bigger than we thought it was going to be," says Gordon Rodda, zoologist and lead project researcher. "They are moving northward, there's no question."

Burmese pythons were introduced to the USA as part of the pet trade. The first specimens in the wild were discovered in the mid-1990s in the Florida Everglades, released by owners who no longer wanted them, says Skip Snow, a wildlife biologist with the National Parks Service in the Everglades.

By 2003, there was evidence the snakes had established breeding colonies in the wild. Florida began regulating their sale and ownership Jan. 1.

If federal officials had to worry only about Florida, it would be "decades" before the pythons move into other states, Rodda says. But people keep dumping pythons they don't want into the wild. "We just learned about some that had been released in Arkansas," he says.

The Burmese python is not poisonous and not considered a danger to humans. Attacks on humans have involved pet owners who mishandle and misfeed the snakes, Snow says. In Florida, they eat bobcats, deer, alligators, raccoons, cats, rats, rabbits, muskrats, possum, mice, ducks, egrets, herons and song birds. They grab with their mouth to anchor the prey, then coil around the animal and crush it to death before eating it whole.

If you see one, don't attempt to engage it. Leave the area, note the location and notify the authorities.

http://news.aol.com/story/_a/warmin...s/20080221084309990001?ncid=NWS00010000000001
 
This thread fails I was expecting a awesome article about Snake Plissken and Solid Snake teaming up to take over. :(
 
So that explains why I see this thing outside my window:

f_bp_snakeman.jpg


OH FCK!!! It's trying to break in. I'm going- ah!!!!!!
 
This thread fails I was expecting a awesome article about Snake Plissken and Solid Snake teaming up to take over. :(

Solid Snake is actually a former member of G.I. Joe. He was the character named as Snake Eyes replacement.
 
Pfft... the killer bees will get us first. Or the Oompa Loompas.
 
I'd love to see this morons come here. I'm Asteroid-Man! Snakes I can take, their Emperor Kobra (yes with a K) is the only one that stands a threat!!!
 
Why do people use dumb words like 'unruly' to describe a satelite and now 'colonize' like snakes are going to take over the major metropolitan areas.....?
 
Why do people use dumb words like 'unruly' to describe a satelite and now 'colonize' like snakes are going to take over the major metropolitan areas.....?
It could have something to do with the fact that the word, "colonize," has different implications when used in different contexts. I'm pretty sure that the word, "colonize," is an appropriate word from an ecological standpoint.

Basically, it means establishing the basis for a population.
 
It could have something to do with the fact that the word, "colonize," has different implications when used in different contexts. I'm pretty sure that the word, "colonize," is an appropriate word from an ecological standpoint.

Basically, it means establishing the basis for a population.

Exactly.

Many species, including termites, bees, ants, wasps, snakes, some fish, and even cats live in colonies.
 
It could have something to do with the fact that the word, "colonize," has different implications when used in different contexts. I'm pretty sure that the word, "colonize," is an appropriate word from an ecological standpoint.

Basically, it means establishing the basis for a population.

Exactly.

Many species, including termites, bees, ants, wasps, snakes, some fish, and even cats live in colonies.
Snakes do not live in colonies:o
 
Snakes do not live in colonies:o
1) That's not what I'm talking about.

2) Certain species are known to have massive aggregations in underground dens. The most notable genus to exhibit this behavior is Thamnophis, or Garter Snakes. Still, I'm not sure you could call that a colony anyways....but I think that was the basis for his reply.
 
1) That's not what I'm talking about.

2) Certain species are known to have massive aggregations in underground dens. The most notable genus to exhibit this behavior is Thamnophis, or Garter Snakes. Still, I'm not sure you could call that a colony anyways....but I think that was the basis for his reply.
Migration:huh:
 
No Samuel L. Jackson jokes yet, I'm proud of you guys. :up:
 
said:
As climate change warms the nation, giant Burmese pythons could colonize one-third of the USA, from San Francisco across the Southwest, Texas and the South and up north along the Virginia coast, according to U.S. Geological Survey maps released Wednesday.

Read that...it is just a poor choice of words whether that be the thread starter someone actual said that. It should read: "As climate change warms the nation, giant Burmese pythons could colonize in one-third of the USA, from San Francisco across the Southwest, Texas and the South and up north along the Virginia coast, according to U.S. Geological Survey maps released Wednesday." See how that little 'in' changes the whole meaning of the sentence?
 
Migration:huh:
...no?

Read that...it is just a poor choice of words whether that be the thread starter someone actual said that. It should read: "As climate change warms the nation, giant Burmese pythons could colonize in one-third of the USA, from San Francisco across the Southwest, Texas and the South and up north along the Virginia coast, according to U.S. Geological Survey maps released Wednesday."
That wording is so incredibly awkward. Again, given the context and the varying connotations of the word, it works. You're just thinking of it in unilateral terms.

Ecologically, it's a completely acceptable term for the situation.
 

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