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Brad Pitt Climbs Tree of Life

Hunter Rider

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Source: Variety
December 19, 2007


Brad Pitt is in talks to star in Tree of Life, a drama Terrence Malick wrote and will direct.

River Road is financing, and Bill Pohlad is producing with Sarah Green (The New World) and Grant Hill.

Pitt, who recently ankled the Universal Pictures drama State of Play, would replace Heath Ledger, who was scheduled to star with Sean Penn in the Malick-directed drama, which begins production in the spring.

Though Penn is booked to play the title character in the Gus Van Sant-directed Harvey Milk, he's still expected to play a supporting role in Tree of Life.

http://www.comingsoon.net/news/movienews.php?id=40323
 
Perhaps this is Pitt's way of making "The Fountain" after the complications with Darren Aronofsky? .... since that movie is about the same thing.

Sorry, but this movie won't be better than "The Fountain."
 
This movie should be amazing, Malick is a god, but yeah- Brad Pitt would be distracting for me, seeing as how he ditched The Fountain.

Even though I love Malick and Pitt, I agree, I don't see how this can top the Fountain. We'll undoubtably get a long, engrossing, beautiful film- but even a Malick film doesn't contain the beauty, emotion, and most of all pace found in The Fountain.
 
I'm burnt out on Brad Pitt right now. He and his mistress need to fade away and stop adopting 3 kids a month for a while if they want to salvage a career.
 
This is my problem with Hollywood actors now... Brad Pitt, Tom Cruise, George Clooney, Angelina Jolie.... They are so bombarded with press and media coverage, it's literally IMPOSSIBLE to look at them in a movie and forget that they're actors playing roles. It's just Brad, Tom, George, Angelina slapped into movies, instead of watching characters in a story. At this point, I'm avoiding all movies that have those people in them.

Now, if we wanna talk about real talent, actors who are not bombarded with Hollywood bull****, look at Hugh Jackman, Leonardo DiCaprio, Christian Bale, Heath Ledger.... Those are keepers, in my opinion. Real class acts who are NOT hollywood.
 
It's never been an issue for me, I don't read any of the tabloidy stuff so they are all just movie stars to me.
 
Hollywood has the unique ability to ruin people before they know what has happened.
It just turns them into products the minute they show a bit of likability or talent.
Or in Paris Hilton's case the mutant ability to turn bad dancing, bellow average looks and *****y attitude into piles of money.
 
Appears to be a period piece:

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Terrence Malik needs to finish that other movie The Thin red line. It's missing at least a half hour.
 
Summary:
Written & Directed by: Terrence Malick
Cast: Brad Pitt, Sean Penn and Jessica Chastain
Producers: William Pohlad, Sarah Green, Brad Pitt, Dede Gardner, Grant Hill

Our picture is a cosmic epic, a hymn to life.

We trace the evolution of an eleven-year-old boy in the Midwest, Jack, one of three brothers. At first all seems marvelous to the child. He sees as his mother does, with the eyes of his soul. She represents the way of love and mercy, where the father tries to teach his son the world's way, of putting oneself first. Each parent contends for his allegiance, and Jack must reconcile their claims. The picture darkens as he has his first glimpses of sickness, suffering and death. The world, once a thing of glory, becomes a labyrinth.

Framing this story is that of adult Jack, a lost soul in a modern world, seeking to discover amid the changing scenes of time that which does not change: the eternal scheme of which we are a part. When he sees all that has gone into our world's preparation, each thing appears a miracle — precious, incomparable. Jack, with his new understanding, is able to forgive his father and take his first steps on the path of life.

The story ends in hope, acknowledging the beauty and joy in all things, in the everyday and above all in the family -- our first school -- the only place that most of us learn the truth about the world and ourselves, or discover life's single most important lesson, of unselfish love.
 
Brad looks a lot like my uncle Vincent with that hair cut.

*I can't help but think of "The Fountain" but this sounds really deep, and I'm getting good vibes that this will be very good.
 
http://www.comingsoon.net/news/movienews.php?id=53361

Malick's Tree of Life to Have Dinosaurs?
Source: Hollywood Elsewhere
March 2, 2009


Hollywood Elsewhere has posted an interesting quote from VFX artist Mike Fink in Empire magazine talking about working on Terrence Malick's upcoming The Tree of Life, starring Brad Pitt and Sean Penn:

"We're just starting work on a project for Terrence Malick, animating dinosaurs, the film is The Tree of Life, starring Brad Pitt and Sean Penn. It'll be showing in IMAX -- so the dinosaurs will actually be life size -- and the shots of the creatures will be long and lingering."

Now this is the synopsis for the film:

Our picture is a cosmic epic, a hymn to life.

We trace the evolution of an eleven-year-old boy in the Midwest, Jack, one of three brothers. At first all seems marvelous to the child. He sees as his mother does, with the eyes of his soul. She represents the way of love and mercy, where the father tries to teach his son the world's way, of putting oneself first. Each parent contends for his allegiance, and Jack must reconcile their claims. The picture darkens as he has his first glimpses of sickness, suffering and death. The world, once a thing of glory, becomes a labyrinth.

Framing this story is that of adult Jack, a lost soul in a modern world, seeking to discover amid the changing scenes of time that which does not change: the eternal scheme of which we are a part. When he sees all that has gone into our world's preparation, each thing appears a miracle — precious, incomparable. Jack, with his new understanding, is able to forgive his father and take his first steps on the path of life.

The story ends in hope, acknowledging the beauty and joy in all things, in the everyday and above all in the family -- our first school -- the only place that most of us learn the truth about the world and ourselves, or discover life's single most important lesson, of unselfish love.


Summit Entertainment has not set a release date for the film yet.
 
Wasn't expecting Dinosaurs in a Malick film :eek:
 
Malick is one of my favorite directors and I've always liked Brad Pitt, hollywood gloss, mediocre films and all. Can't wait.
 
Woah, this thread started back in '07, has this movie even come out yet?
 
No it hasn't yet, I've been waiting and waiting. Crossing my fingers that it's worth it.
 
http://www.vanityfair.com/online/os...rumbull-to-work-on-terrence-malick-movie.html
TCM Festival: Hollywood Visionary Douglas Trumbull to Work on Terrence Malick Movie
by Rebecca Keegan April 25, 2010, 3:02 PM

Hollywood is littered with the bodies of creative people who had a great idea about 10 minutes too early. Douglas Trumbull is one of those people, only he has had about a dozen brilliant ideas that were premature by decades.

The visual effects pioneer who helped Stanley Kubrick realize his ambitious vision for 2001: A Space Odyssey, Trumbull made a rare appearance at the Turner Classic Movies Film Festival in Hollywood in conjunction with a screening of a 70mm print of the science-fiction epic. In a frank, reflective, two-hour discussion, Trumbull confirmed that he worked on a new Terrence Malick film, his first feature credit in 27 years. Trumbull also shared his views on Avatar and showed fascinating clips from a making-of documentary called 2001: Beyond the Infinite.

"I'm tired of talking about 2001," Trumbull confessed to a crowd of about 75 people at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel who had gathered to hear him do just that. While working for Kubrick at age 23, Trumbull was sent on errands into London in the director's Bentley to retrieve objects needed for the ground-breaking effects. His most significant contribution to the film was the psychedelic tunnel of colored light called the Star Gate sequence. After 2001's release in 1968, Trumbull worked on Close Encounters of the Third Kind, Blade Runner and Star Trek: The Movie, and directed two sci-fi films of his own, 1972's Silent Running and 1983's Brainstorm.

Kubrick wanted 2001 to be a first-person experience about being in space, Trumbull said, and the director designed the film for a 90-foot screen. As a result of his experience on the movie, Trumbull became enthralled by the possibilities of giant screens just as grand movie palaces were giving way to multiplexes. "The palettes for immersive experiences went away right after I got entranced by the whole thing," he said. Nevertheless Trumbull was a hot young commodity in Hollywood after 2001, and he directed the eco-sci fi film Silent Running, starring a young Bruce Dern and a robot that was a clear inspiration for R2-D2. George Lucas tried to hire Trumbull to helm the effects on Star Wars, but Trumbull turned him down. "That would have changed the direction of my life," he said. But I had my own career path. Trumbull went on to create various prescient moviemaking technologies with names like Magicam and Showscan. He worked constantly on immersive, dynamic entertainment experiencesa predecessor to IMAX, 3-D video games, Universal Studios' Back to the Future ride.

It was after directing Brainstorm, a film that was meant to be a debut for the Showscan technique, that Trumbull abruptly left Hollywood. In 1981, with photography nearly finished, star Natalie Wood died before shooting a crucial scene. The picture hung in limbo for two years until Trumbull completed it using body doubles, and without Showscan, which the studio wasnt ready to take a chance on after all. That experience drove me out of this industry, he said. The lawyers, the insurance companies, the creeps. Trumbull moved to Massachusetts, where he has lived for the last 27 years.

The Malick project will be Trumbull's first feature credit since Brainstorm. Malick is working on two films, a long-awaited cosmic family drama starring Brad Pitt called Tree of Life, and an accompanying IMAX movie. Like most who work with the notoriously secretive director, Trumbull was reluctant to discuss the project. But he hinted at a retro style of visual effects: "Terry is a friend," Trumbull said. "He said to me, 'I don't like CG.' I said, 'Why not do it the old way? The way we did it in 2001?'" Trumbull said he also has two modestly priced sci-fi fantasy movies of his own in stages of development. And there is the 2001 documentary, made in partnership with author David Larson, who has spent years digging through the Kubrick Archive in London, unearthing artwork, photographs, and memos. The clips of the documentary Trumbull showed bring back the computer HAL as a character that takes viewers through the artifacts. But Trumbull, for reasons he declined to discuss, is pessimistic about the documentary ever making it to audiences.

Trumbull's tone in the talk varied from awe over the potential of movies as a technological art form to dismay over the reality of Hollywood as a smotherer of innovation and creativity. "I spent my life on the fringes trying to be a normal director," he said. "You do that at your peril. Studios don't want to know that you're a geek." But Trumbull was moved by the recent work of another geek auteur—he called Avatar "a technology-enabled out-of-body experience." Trumbull's work in 2001 heavily influenced James Cameron: the tunnel of light humans pass through to inhabit their avatar bodies owes an obvious debt to the Star Gate sequence. And what Cameron has done with Avatar—create an immersive cinematic experience—is what Douglas Trumbull has been doing his entire career. He was just a few decades early.


I'm hoping that studios will show the IMAX cut worldwide.
 

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