If you're a non wga writer...

Discussion in 'Misc. Films' started by Darthkush, Nov 19, 2007.

  1. Darthkush Avenger

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    ...how will the strike affect writers who are not apart of the wga? Without getting into it too much, a friend and i are writers and we're thinking of going to california in a month or two to pitch a few things. Will they even listen to us right now or is it better to wait until after the strike? Reply here or private message me. I'm really wanting to know. I have 2 scripts ready to go and a third almost done.
     
  2. Dr. Evil Registered

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    Once the writers go back to work, any non-union writers who work with the movie studios will probably be "blacklisted" from writing for any studios.
     
  3. Darthkush Avenger

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    What about RIGHT NOW? If we get in BEFORE they go back to work, will they listen to us?
     
  4. odiin Registered

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    If I'm not mistaken, non-union writers aren't able to write for union projects.
     
  5. Darthkush Avenger

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    So we can't go in there an pitch our original scripts? They're not union projects. Can a studio buy our script from us?
     
  6. enterthemadness The Triumvirate

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    Yeah. From what I know, you have to sell a script first anyway to join any of the two WGA unions. You can register your scripts under them without being a member though.
     
  7. odiin Registered

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    Yeah, that's perfectly fine, you can always pitch your original stuff.
     
  8. WorthyStevens Green Man

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    Possibly. Now's not the time to do it though, unless you'd like to get blacklisted from screenwriting for major productions for the remainder of your life.
     
  9. cky Registered

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    You missed the time to sell your script. There was a big block of time about 7 months prior to the strike where the studios were buying up scripts. No studio will touch a script right now or a scab writer right now. If they were TV shows wouldn't be ending short. The studios have enough scripts probably to last a few months.

    My advice is NOT to go to California right now, but wait until the strike is over. Why? Because you'll be blacklisted and you'll never get to join the WGA and you'll never work on a union job EVER.

    But if you really want to go to California, and want to pitch your script. You can't do it to any of the following studios. http://www.wga.org/subpage_member.aspx?id=2537

    I would post the list, but it's long.
     
  10. Cinemaman Registered

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    As I remember, most of major or even indie film studious (especially in such place as Hollywood) won't listen to you until you become WGA writer. Why? Because WGA protect and care about you, while usually their writers sign up contract with studious under WGA's eye.
     
  11. scifiwolf Registered

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    Regardless of the consequences from the WGA for trying to undercut them, I don't think the studios would listen anyway. Hollywood stinks with the scent of unions on every level.
     
  12. Steve Rogers Registered

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    If they want your screenplay, they want your screenplay. You likely won't be hired as a staff writer on any TV show or for any movie studio, but WGA member or not, you can sell a screenplay. However, that screenplay must be registered with the WGA. Also, they won't even listen to you if you don't have an agent. It is illegal for them to negotiate for unsolicited material. Hope all that helps.
     
  13. faceplant i have ninja like focus

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    good luck crossing the lines
     
  14. Anita18 DANCE FOR ME, FUNNY MAN!

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    My friend is a non-WGA member writing a script for a production company so small they haven't made a movie yet, so it's not one of the struck companies, LOL. I think she's ok if she doesn't give them anything else until the strike is over. She can still write - she just can't show it to them. Which is all fine and dandy with her, since she's still working on making the script unsucky. :oldrazz:

    But as I said, the production company is so small they're probably off the radar anyway...

    From what I understand, writers are still able to write (if they can find time between picketing, etc). But they can't show the struck companies what they've been working on.

    Good luck with the writing though. I have a bunch of friends working on scripts, and this particular friend got a gig because her second cousin had some connections. It's a tough business to break into....
     
  15. terry78 My name is Stefan, sweet thang

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    The only reason to do it would be if you want to be a one hit wonder in the writing world. Because you won't be selling anymore scripts unless you produce the **** yourself.
     
  16. Dr. Manhatten Registered

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    It's always seemed really unfair that only union writers can do anything in Hollywood and to even reach that, you have to be an agent and be in WGA. I'm an aspiring writer but hate all those roadblocks
     
  17. Steve Rogers Registered

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    Try being a director.
     
  18. Cinemaman Registered

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    Actually agents and unions help you get the job and not to let somebody fool you.
     
  19. Darthkush Avenger

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    Another question? I've been talking about this to my writing partner and all he keeps mentioning are quentin tarentino and robert rodriguez. He insists neither are part of the guild and didn't seem to need it to make it. Is this true? I found info on Tarentino on wikipedia talking about how he got funding for reservoir dogs through writing natural born killers and other films. Did he does those under the WGA? What about Rodriguez?

    Any info would be most appreciated :)
     
  20. cky Registered

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    Tarantino got funding for Reservoir Dogs by the sale of his script for True Romance.

    But Tarantino and Rodriguez both left the WGA and DGA. Rodriguez said he left because there are too many rules and they just take your money. He left the DGA because he wanted Frank Miller to help direct Sin City.

    But if you still want to go to LA and try to sell your scripts. You CAN NOT go to any of these companies or you will be labeled a scab writer. Please look at this list and stay away from this companies. http://www.wga.org/subpage_member.aspx?id=2537

    Also, remember there are millions of inspiring writers/directors trying to make it in Hollywood. Tarantino, Rodriguez, and Kevin Smith types were lucky, and they'll admit that.
     

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