Is it inappropriate to acknowledge sexiness in cosplay?

Spider-Who?

ERMERGERD!
Joined
Dec 5, 2001
Messages
11,346
Reaction score
14
Points
58
So...does anyone follow Simon Pegg on twitter? He got into some trouble for posting this:

@SimonPegg: Also, I've got a thing about cosplay girls. They're like zombie stormtroopers, a glorious combination of beloved things. ‪#SDCC

@SimonPegg: *makes noise like Homer Simpson thinking of donuts* http://twitpic.com/a8myof

These two seemingly harmless tweets started a Twitter War about feminism and sexism in geek culture, with two feminists, @cnstoker and @indeedemma.

Both immediately lashed out at him, calling him "gross", an "unenlightened jerk" among other things. When Simon Pegg's followers came to his defense (albeit aggressively), these two immediately started crying about how they only wanted to "open up a civil dialogue" with him regarding sexism in geek culture, and have since labeled him as an evil, sexist commander of Twitter who "sent" his followers after them, when in reality, he told his followers NOT to and that every one is entitled to their opinion. They DEMANDED him to apologize for his tweets, which he refused at first, but eventually did anyway.

Now, the drama aside, I DO think that it is an interesting topic of debate, and figured there might be a place for it here. Personally, there is a fine line between addressing someone's attractiveness, and being a pervert/sexist. I do not think that Simon Pegg's tweets fall into the latter category. It seems that the two "anti-Pegg" posters believe that men cannot acknowledge a woman's attractiveness AT ALL, and that all admittance of any sexuality is a crime, especially when it comes to geekdom, as it further alienates geek women from being fully welcomed into that world.


When a male acknowledges a female's attractiveness, does that mean the male is "taking possession of that woman's sexuality" and is an act of objectification, as these two claim?

It's bad for Simon Pegg to say he likes cosplay girls, but wheres the people damning scores of women for literally screaming in sexualized fervor over the Twilight guys?

Why do women choose to dress in provocative cosplay? Some say they choose to be sexy for themselves, and that it's wrong/sexist if anyone else finds them attractive.

For the female Hypsters here, do you cospay? If so, does the potential for male attention (good and bad) influence who you choose to dress as? If so, is this attention negative and sexist to you?

http://storify.com/cnstoker/cosplayers-are-geeks-too
 
It's a tricky thing. Acknowledging a person's attractiveness can be harmless, or it can overstep boundaries. It, like most social interaction, is a tight rope act that depends a lot on the context and the people involved. I think the blanket statement of "I find attractive women dressed as fictional characters to be sexy" is harmless in of itself, but it can be taken to a dark place pretty easily.
 
Personally, if they want to dress up in skin tight or revealing costumes they want the attention.

BUT, that doesn't mean you can or should talk to them in a sleazy manner.
 
Personally, if they want to dress up in skin tight or revealing costumes they want the attention.

How is that a personally? Either they do or they don't, it's not a subjective thing.
 
How is that a personally? Either they do or they don't, it's not a subjective thing.

It's what I believe is all. Some will disagree about the attention thing. I got into a fat argument with a girl a long time ago when I said girls who dress up in certain clothes in public want the attention and shouldn't be grossed out or offended when numerous guys check them out.

I guess I should have left out the personally, but I also don't get why you want out of your way to comment on that little thing. :funny:
 
Real talk: Don't wear sexy cloths if you don't want sexy attention.
 
Most of the characters they dress as are kind of sexist to begin with honestly, so no, I do not see any problem here.
 
Yeah, the girls who put themselves out there like that need to expect comments like that. If guys were getting physical with them or following them around, that'd be one thing. But getting angry about women dressing in next to nothing being commented on is nothing short of ridiculous.

If the feminists want to *****, they should ***** a the people in the industries who designed those costumes.
 
Wow, Cnstoker seems like a real butt hurt individual. She seems like the kind of person that ruins most parties lol.
 
But someone should be able to dress however they like and not get unwanted comments. The people around them should be able to control themselves and respect boundaries. I don't think comments about a person's sexuality are a bad thing in of themselves, but if they're not wanted then they shouldn't be forced on someone.
 
As long as he didn't grab anyone's ass, it's fine. If you're cosplaying in a skimpy outfit, you'd be an idiot to think that wouldn't attract attention. But it doesn't excuse creepster behavior.

A friend of mine bemusedly complained about a guy at SDCC who took a picture down her shirt when he thought she wasn't looking. It wasn't the attention that she disapproved of - she has large breasts, she's aware that guys are attracted to cleavage. It was the fact that taking a picture of a girl's body parts without her looking is creepster behavior! Stare at it in person like a man! :cmad: "Or at least ASK!" as she put it. :funny:

I'm dressing up as Catwoman for the TDKR midnight screening. I am fully aware that I might very well attract some attention. I'm prepared for that. It's fine. I'm even prepared in case someone tries to grab my ass, but I don't think he'd like my reaction. I've been weight training (including full squats with a barbell) for such an occasion. :hehe: Lookie, but no touchie! And at least have the courtesy to tell us you want a picture instead of trying take one when we're not looking like a creepy stalker.
 
Last edited:
It actually annoys me when some women get mad when guys are checking them out when they're wearing next to nothing or very revealing clothes.

As others have said as long as the guy isnt touching them or saying vulgar comments, I dont see the big deal
 
Most of the characters they dress as are kind of sexist to begin with honestly, so no, I do not see any problem here.


This ^

and
Real talk: Don't wear sexy cloths if you don't want sexy attention.

This^


It's not even like these woman are just dressing up to go to the club. They're going to conventions and taking pictures with people. Some are just trying to further a modeling career. They put themselves out there for these type of comments. It can become harassment but he didn't cross that line.
 
But someone should be able to dress however they like and not get unwanted comments. The people around them should be able to control themselves and respect boundaries. I don't think comments about a person's sexuality are a bad thing in of themselves, but if they're not wanted then they shouldn't be forced on someone.

I agree, but in this case of what Simon Pegg did he simply made a joke about "OMG hot girls in my favorite nerd outfits." He didn't go out of his way to make them feel uncomfortable or molest those girls. If his actions were different and actually offensive, she'd have my support.
 
What are everyone's thoughts on the claim that "this type of behavior" hinders female geeks ability to fully integrate into "geek culture"?
 
I don't think it's inherently inappropriate. It just depends on how you say it.
 
What are everyone's thoughts on the claim that "this type of behavior" hinders female geeks ability to fully integrate into "geek culture"?
Whatever it is, it isn't from cosplay. Most geeks don't cosplay anyway.

It starts at the comic book store where I get the funny stares while my bf is treated as normal. It continues as misogynist comments are used to tear down other men, although to be fair this isn't contained to geek culture, but many other male-heavy cultures like gaming. THAT'S the kind of behavior that turns off women from geek culture.
 
One thing I hate about society is how everyone is so super sensitive to any type of innocuous comment.
 
Also, booth babes and cosplayers are not the same thing. Booth babes are paid for you to look at them. Most of them they don't give a crap about what they're schilling. The popularity of booth babes can be intimidating to some female convention-goers. But more often than not we'll probably roll our eyes at the company and ignore what they're selling since they can't think up any marketing scheme other than, "Put a hot chick in front of our product!" It really doesn't make us women feel welcome or accepted.

Cosplayers want attention at some level too, but don't forget that they are also geeks like you. So engage them the same way you'd engage another fellow geek. They're not there JUST to be stared at.

Something tells me that more than one person will assume that my bf bribed me into dressing up as Catwoman for TDKR instead of me deciding for myself. :funny:
 
Yeah, the girls who put themselves out there like that need to expect comments like that. If guys were getting physical with them or following them around, that'd be one thing. But getting angry about women dressing in next to nothing being commented on is nothing short of ridiculous.

If the feminists want to *****, they should ***** a the people in the industries who designed those costumes.
Sometimes I wonder how many of these stones thrown at men in general are particularly honest.

I've done things, and certainly said things, that if read allowed in a court room would be sexual assault/harassment. I mean, to a certain degree I like to think I'm more smooth about it I like to think, but maybe I'm not.

To a certain extent I've lived both sides of the coin. I've worked towards being more physically attractive I feel, but I mean I'm not certain I was but whatever...

...the point is since I've felt more attractive I've noticed I have the ability to get away with things I'm just not sure others can.

So that's what irks me here. When Ryan Gosling says it, okay, we're fine with it. When Simon Pegg, who is funny, but let's be honest, not a sex symbol, says it, well then it's harassment.

Sometimes I feel though, like the Tom Brady SNL skit said, to avoid sexual harassment claims "be attractive, don't be unattractive".
 
Why do women choose to dress in provocative cosplay? Some say they choose to be sexy for themselves, and that it's wrong/sexist if anyone else finds them attractive.

Anyone who would say that needs to beaten within an inch of his/her life with Leia's metal bra. The utter stupidity of that is mind blowing. :doh:
 
I dont get why people get insulted when others say they find them sexy. Is sexy a bad thing? Howso exactly?

Personally, if someone went up to me and said I looked hot/sexy/etc, I would get very flattered. Sadly that never happens :(
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Latest posts

Forum statistics

Threads
200,529
Messages
21,752,030
Members
45,586
Latest member
Blinken
Back
Top
monitoring_string = "afb8e5d7348ab9e99f73cba908f10802"