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.XXX Domain Squashed

jaguarr

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http://www.cbc.ca/storyview/MSN/world/national/2006/05/11/internet-porn.html

.XXX does not mark the spot for porn sites

Last Updated Thu, 11 May 2006 14:05:57 EDT CBC News
A plan that would have had all pornography sites end with the .XXX suffix has been quashed by internet regulators.
The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) voted 9-5 to reject efforts to establish a domain for the porn industry.
The Florida-based company proposing the name, ICM Registry Inc., argued the domain would help the industry clean up its act because those using the domain would have to adhere to rules barring spamming and malicious programming.
Anti-porn advocates were opposed to the proposal, arguing the designated domain name would legitimize adult sites. They also said porn sites would be able to keep their .com address, making porn more accessible.
Many porn sites were also against the move, fearing it could lead to some censorship.
ICANN chief executive Paul Twomey said the creation of .XXX sites might put the organization in the position of having to regulate the online pornography industry, a task considered extremely difficult because of different laws around the world.




Looks like the voice of reason prevailed. :up:

jag
 
I mean, how creepy would you feel if you had to type .xxx everytime you visit a porn site!?
 
I am so grateful.

They were taking steps towards Big Brother with that.
 
I think the biggest issue is the censorship that would evolve from creating an .xxx domain. :down
 
More on this:

http://www.iht.com/articles/2006/05/11/business/icann.php

Interference by U.S. seen in vote on .xxx domain
Reuters

THURSDAY, MAY 11, 2006
BRUSSELS The Internet governing body's decision to reject a .xxx Internet domain for pornographic sites is a clear case of U.S. political interference in the Web's governance, the European Commission charged on Thursday.

The board of the Internet Corporation of Assigned Names and Numbers, known as Icann, on Wednesday voted 9- to-5 to dismiss the application to register the domain name, which would have been like the .com or .net at the end of an Internet address.

Supporters said a .xxx domain would have made it easier to confine sex sites or filter them out, but U.S. critics like the Family Research Council, a conservative religious group, complained that it would only legitimize the adult entertainment industry.

Many adult-oriented sites also objected, fearing that such a domain would pave the way to filter speech. A trade group, the Free Speech Coalition, said a domain for child-friendly sites would be more appropriate.

"We see here a first clear case of political interference in Icann," said Martin Selmayr, a spokesman for Viviane Reding, the European commissioner for information society and media. He said correspondence between Icann and the U.S. Department of Commerce highlighted the "interference."

Selmayr said the decision underscored the need to make Icann independent quickly, following unsuccessful demands last year by the EU and other countries to achieve that goal.

Icann, a nonprofit group based in California, cannot make changes to the domain-name system without the approval of the U.S. Commerce Department.

Selmayr urged further steps to complete the privatization of Icann this year to release it from the oversight of the Department of Commerce.

Icann said in a statement on Wednesday that its discussion had focused on issues like sponsorship, compliance and public policy concerns.

The .xxx application was seen as a test case of Icann's independence.

At a summit meeting in Tunis last November, the United States fought off attempts to wrest control of the domain-name system from the Commerce Department.

The U.S. government's control of the domain-name system had become a sticking point for countries like Iran and Brazil, who argued that it should be managed by the United Nations or another global body. The United States said that such a body would stifle innovation with red tape.

Separately, Icann approved the creation of a .tel domain to help people manage their contact information online. The domain could be in use as early as this year. $@


BRUSSELS The Internet governing body's decision to reject a .xxx Internet domain for pornographic sites is a clear case of U.S. political interference in the Web's governance, the European Commission charged on Thursday.

The board of the Internet Corporation of Assigned Names and Numbers, known as Icann, on Wednesday voted 9- to-5 to dismiss the application to register the domain name, which would have been like the .com or .net at the end of an Internet address.

Supporters said a .xxx domain would have made it easier to confine sex sites or filter them out, but U.S. critics like the Family Research Council, a conservative religious group, complained that it would only legitimize the adult entertainment industry.

Many adult-oriented sites also objected, fearing that such a domain would pave the way to filter speech. A trade group, the Free Speech Coalition, said a domain for child-friendly sites would be more appropriate.

"We see here a first clear case of political interference in Icann," said Martin Selmayr, a spokesman for Viviane Reding, the European commissioner for information society and media. He said correspondence between Icann and the U.S. Department of Commerce highlighted the "interference."

Selmayr said the decision underscored the need to make Icann independent quickly, following unsuccessful demands last year by the EU and other countries to achieve that goal.

Icann, a nonprofit group based in California, cannot make changes to the domain-name system without the approval of the U.S. Commerce Department.

Selmayr urged further steps to complete the privatization of Icann this year to release it from the oversight of the Department of Commerce.

Icann said in a statement on Wednesday that its discussion had focused on issues like sponsorship, compliance and public policy concerns.

The .xxx application was seen as a test case of Icann's independence.

At a summit meeting in Tunis last November, the United States fought off attempts to wrest control of the domain-name system from the Commerce Department.

The U.S. government's control of the domain-name system had become a sticking point for countries like Iran and Brazil, who argued that it should be managed by the United Nations or another global body. The United States said that such a body would stifle innovation with red tape.

Separately, Icann approved the creation of a .tel domain to help people manage their contact information online. The domain could be in use as early as this year.


jag
 
DV8 said:
I mean, how creepy would you feel if you had to type .xxx everytime you visit a porn site!?
Yeah, I feel wierd enough typing "Ass Parade" every 10 minutes anyways.
 
dialog-vega4.gif
I think you guys are waaaay overreacting. The domain change was just to make it easier for internet filters to distinguish adult sites from regular ones. Changing the domain name isn't going to censor anything out since the websites will still be there. It's not like access to those sites will become harder or more restricted. The access will be the same it will only be a different domain.
 
grouping them all in one domain makes it that much easier to later impose some sort of blocking or regulation on the entire industry.
 
The Adult Industry is happy about this decision:

http://news.com.com/Adult+industry+welcomes+.xxx+domain+rejection/2100-1047_3-6071748.html

Adult industry welcomes .xxx domain rejection

By Ingrid Marson
http://news.com.com/Adult+industry+welcomes+.xxx+domain+rejection/2100-1047_3-6071748.html

Story last modified Fri May 12 15:19:04 PDT 2006

Adult companies have joined conservative groups in celebrating an Internet regulator's decision to reject the creation of a domain for adult Web sites.

On Wednesday, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) voted against the proposal, which would have led to the creation of an .xxx domain suffix for pornography sites. Conservative groups in the U.S., such as the Family Research Council, have welcomed the decision.

"This would have been a landgrab for pornographers, and ICANN did absolutely the right thing," Charmaine Yoest, a vice president of the Family Research Council, told Bloomberg.

Some in the adult industry are equally happy about the decision. Adult-industry observer Scott McGowan, in an article on the EyeOnAdult Web site, said he "just couldn't be happier." He claimed that ICM Registry, which proposed the new top-level domain, was driven purely by the desire to make money.

"When conservatives and the porn industry actually agree on something, it kind of says something, even if their motivations come from different places," said McGowan.

"It's my belief that everyone saw this for exactly what it was, a get-rich-quick scheme. ICM wanted to play God, re-create the online adult industry in their own image and reap the benefits," he said.

Clinton Alexander, a U.S.-based Web designer who's worked for a number of adult sites, claimed adult companies had little to gain from switching to the .xxx domain.

"Out of all the parties involved with the decision, only one of them actually wanted the .xxx suffix: the ICM Registry. The only real reason they wanted it is they see it as a possible gold mine," he said.

"Adult companies do not want an .xxx domain because there is no additional profit in it (in fact, there is additional cost) and exposes them to possible future regulation. What's the point of moving an extremely popular and profitable Web site from a .com to an .xxx domain?"

Alexander added that adult companies actually want to make content more mainstream and claimed the majority were therefore opposed to the .xxx domain.

"The idea in the adult entertainment industry is to mainstream adult content to the point where it is not different from selling any other commodity, such as groceries," Alexander said. "The more publicly mainstream porn becomes, the more money the adult entertainment companies make...Creating an 'Internet red light district' goes against mainstreaming adult content, so most of the producers I know were against the .xxx suffix from the beginning of the debate."

Stuart Lawley, the chairman and president of ICM Registry, disagreed on Friday with the comments made by McGowan and Alexander.

Many of the world's biggest adult providers had agreed to participate in the .xxx plan voluntarily, as did adult companies from more than 70 countries, according to Lawley, although he was unable to provide the names of the companies as they are "confidential."
In other news:

Lawley said it was in the interest of adult companies to participate because they could "clearly label themselves" and avoid being confused with the illegal child pornography industry.

"In layman terms, the porn and child porn industry get intermingled. Legitimate adult industry companies do not deal with child pornography," Lawley said. "This scheme would allow adult companies to step forward and clearly identify themselves as a legitimate adult entertainment site."

Lawley also disagreed that the .xxx domain was purely a "get-rich-quick scheme," pointing out that ICM Registry had offered to donate $10 annually per domain to charities that fight child pornography. "This could have been $5 (million) or $10 million dollars per year, which is a pretty good effort," he said. "Other (domain owners) give only $1 per domain per year."

Ingrid Marson of ZDNet UK reported from London.


:up:

jag
 
E. Bison said:
dialog-vega4.gif
I think you guys are waaaay overreacting. The domain change was just to make it easier for internet filters to distinguish adult sites from regular ones. Changing the domain name isn't going to censor anything out since the websites will still be there. It's not like access to those sites will become harder or more restricted. The access will be the same it will only be a different domain.
I agree. All the objections to .xxx domaining struck me as sensational. The idea is a good one.
 
Honey Vibe said:
I agree. All the objections to .xxx domaining struck me as sensational. The idea is a good one.

Yet completely useless.
 
Wouldn't there be sites that would fall through the cracks? What about sites with just nudity, or non nude sites with provactive poses by the women inside? Not exactly pornography.
 
Does it really matter? Porn will always be around. If you need it that bad.
 
So many times I've mispelled a web address and ended up at a porn site. Ordinarily, I'd stay and poke around for a bit but it happens at work and that ain't cool.
 
jaguarr said:
http://www.cbc.ca/storyview/MSN/world/national/2006/05/11/internet-porn.html

.XXX does not mark the spot for porn sites

Last Updated Thu, 11 May 2006 14:05:57 EDT CBC News
A plan that would have had all pornography sites end with the .XXX suffix has been quashed by internet regulators.
The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) voted 9-5 to reject efforts to establish a domain for the porn industry.
The Florida-based company proposing the name, ICM Registry Inc., argued the domain would help the industry clean up its act because those using the domain would have to adhere to rules barring spamming and malicious programming.
Anti-porn advocates were opposed to the proposal, arguing the designated domain name would legitimize adult sites. They also said porn sites would be able to keep their .com address, making porn more accessible.
Many porn sites were also against the move, fearing it could lead to some censorship.
ICANN chief executive Paul Twomey said the creation of .XXX sites might put the organization in the position of having to regulate the online pornography industry, a task considered extremely difficult because of different laws around the world.




Looks like the voice of reason prevailed. :up:

jag


I STILL SAY THEY SHOULD USE ".***". :o
 

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