Led Zeppelin rocks O2 !!!

Discussion in 'SHH Community Forum' started by #1Batmanfan, Dec 10, 2007.

  1. #1Batmanfan Registered

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    http://www.billboard.com/bbcom/news/article_display.jsp?vnu_content_id=1003683185


    Led Zeppelin Triumphs At London Reunion Show
    Led Zeppelin
    December 10, 2007, 6:30 PM ET
    A Billboard staff report
    Tonight (Dec. 10) in London, one of the greatest bands of all time was back in front of its adoring public, if only for two-plus hours. Led Zeppelin's 16-song set at London's O2 Arena came as part of a benefit for late Atlantic Records founder Ahmet Ertegun, the group's first full show since drummer John Bonham's 1980 death.

    Zeppelin stormed the stage just after 9 p.m. local time with "Good Times, Bad Times," from its 1969 debut album, and followed with "Ramble On," "Black Dog" and "In My Time of Dying."

    "For Your Life," which the band never performed live in its heyday, was next, with "Trampled Underfoot," "Nobody's Fault But Mine," "No Quarter" and the epics "Since I've Been Lovin' You" and "Dazed and Confused" carrying into the show's second hour.

    "It's peculiar to think of creating a dynamic evening and choosing songs from 10 albums, but there are certain songs that have to be here, and this is one of them," frontman Robert Plant said before the latter. And when Page broke out his trademark double-necked guitar for "Stairway to Heaven," thousands of lighters were held aloft.

    As the show barreled towards its conclusion, Zeppelin unveiled "The Song Remains the Same," "Misty Mountain Hop" and "Kashmir." The encore featured the staples "Whole Lotta Love" and "Rock and Roll."

    Surviving members Page, Plant and John Paul Jones had only played live together a handful of times since the death of Bonham, who was replaced tonight by his son Jason.

    Page's guitar was crisp and clear from the outset, but Plant's voice was blighted by feedback. By the second song, the microphone was functioning properly and Plant was growling and snapping just like he used to.

    Page swung into "Black Dog," with Plant teasing the crowd while the guitarist chopped left and right with industrial power. Classic blues chords summoned a long and dynamic delivery of "In My Time of Dying," as the years truly began to melt away.

    There is rampant speculation Zeppelin will play additional shows in the New Year, but so far, the principals are staying mum. "Let's just do the O2 and we'll see what happens from there," Page told Reuters in a recent interview. "I haven't got a crystal ball here and nor have you."

    A host of top industry executives were present on Monday, including Warner Music Group's Lyor Cohen, AEG Live's Randy Phillips, Best Buy's Gary Arnold, Apple's Jeff Jones, Rhino's David Dorn and Control Room's Kevin Wall. Dave Grohl showed off his Zeppelin tattoo and proclaimed, "I'm so excited. One of the best nights of my life."

    Earlier in the evening, Foreigner performed its hit "I Want To Know What Love Is" with the St. Luke's Church of England choir from Portsmouth, saying, "If it wasn't for Ahmet, none of us would be here." Ex-Rolling Stones bassist Bill Wyman and his Rhythm Kings were on stage beforehand, with vocal assistance from Paul Rodgers and Paolo Nutini.

    By mid-afternoon, the scene at the venue was frenzied, with a 500-strong line for merchandise and huge waits at the will call windows. At a soundcheck on Sunday, select lucky fans were allowed to watch Zeppelin trying out a number of the songs that wound up tonight's set list.

    The event was a magnet for celebrities and rock stars, including Pink Floyd's David Gilmour, Kate Moss, members of Oasis and Genesis, Steve Winwood, Priscilla and Lisa Marie Presley and Marilyn Manson.

    Net profits from the concert will go to the Ahmet Ertegun Education Fund, which provides scholarships for gifted children. For more Led Zeppelin coverage, visit Billboard's Jaded Insider blog.
     
  2. Gamma Ray Registered

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    I wish I was able to go. Led Zeppelin is my favorite band.

    They better get back together and tour! Same goes for Pink Floyd... :(
     
  3. Halcohol Suit up

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    I finished a final exam today exactly when they went on stage. Strangely enough, at the same moment I noticed, my professor got up and told us all to put down our pencils and give a round of applause for Led Zeppelin, who was taking the stage.

    It was surreal to say the least.
     
  4. psychocheeseman Registered

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    man, that would have been one of the most awesome gig's ever!

    pitty i was in the wrong country at the time...
     
  5. Joker Registered

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    Your professor is a dirty hippy :cmad:
     
  6. Addendum Registered

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    I wonder if this will be released on DVD
     
  7. Halcohol Suit up

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    Initially they were saying they didn't want to in case it was a bad performance, but I think that was all bull. I heard this afternoon that they were releasing it on DVD, though.
     
  8. Joker Registered

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    Oh, I'm sure they will. There's money to be made there.
     
  9. Addendum Registered

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    Cool Cool
     
  10. Halcohol Suit up

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    It's almost ridiculous just how much money they're going to make if they decide to do a reunion tour.
     
  11. Motown Marvel Crimson and Clover

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    the show was ridiculous, definitely worth the money spent.
     
  12. Gamma Ray Registered

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    OMG! You're in my class! :wow:
     
  13. Orko Is King Registered

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    I wonder what they sound like now.
     
  14. Ender Durden Registered

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    seriously, is there no youtube of this?
     
  15. Iron E Man Registered

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    I wish I could of been there.
     
  16. Ahura Mazda Registered

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    I heard it was really amazing. I almost bought a ticket but was not able to in the end.
     
  17. PLAS Registered

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    did he pass around the bong afterwards?

    I would have



    yes, WOULD HAVE
     
  18. YsoSerious Registered

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    Led Zeppelin is not Led Zeppelin without John Bonham. Bonham was the heart and soul of that group. Page and Plant must have snorted away all of their money to be possibly even thinking of a "reunion tour".
     
  19. PLAS Registered

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    yup, after 27 years of touring, releasing solo albums, working on various projects each :rolleyes:

    and while Bonham was a great drummer, it was Page and Plant who wrote the songs







    I dunno, but that's gotta count for something, right?
     
  20. Ahura Mazda Registered

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    Led Zeppelin-The full report from David Fricke

    Led Zeppelin: The Full Report From David Fricke
    12/11/07, 9:17 am EST


    For the second encore of their first full concert in twenty-seven years, at London’s 02 arena last night, Led Zeppelin tore into “Rock and Roll,” from their untitled fourth album, with a joyful vengeance. As drummer Jason Bonham hammered with the ghostly precision and ferocity of his late father, guitarist Jimmy Page fired dirty chunks of Chuck Berry and bassist John Paul Jones kept iron time with familiar reserve, singer Robert Plant sang the most obvious words of the night: “Been a long time since I rock and rolled.” Overhead, images of a much younger Zeppelin, in concert during the early and mid-Seventies, flashed on a huge digital-video screen. In those films, Led Zeppelin were the biggest, loudest and most *****ure band in rock. Jimmy Page’s now snow-white hair was still jet black; Robert Plant was a golden god, not yet a Viking elder, and the late John Bonham — whose death in 1980 abruptly ended Zeppelin’s reign — still ruled the engine room.

    But the band that played underneath those memories last night was not the one that misfired at Live Aid in 1985 or again in New York in 1988. This one was rehearsed, ready and out to kill. This band was Led Zeppelin in every way.

    Page, Plant, Jones and Bonham the Younger opened their two-hour show with the confident wit and colossal nerve of “Good Times Bad Times,” the first song on Led Zeppelin’s 1969 debut album. Even before Plant opened his mouth, the original fury — a surprisingly lean, dub-like crossfire of cannonshot chords, frantic, gulping bass runs and polyrhythmic swagger — was in order and in force. “In the days of my youth/I was told what it means to be a man,” Plant sang, in the slightly lower register of someone who gives those lessons now. It was an appropriate effect, too — an admission of age delivered with feral pride — on a night dedicated to the memory of Zeppelin’s late friend and mentor, Atlantic Records’ co-founder Ahmet Ertegun. (Proceeds from ticket sales will go to music scholarships, created in Ertegun’s name, at schools in New York, England and his native Turkey.) Earlier, a quote from Ertegun, who died in 2006 at age 83, hung from banners at the sides of the stage: “It is a great life, this life of music.” Zeppelin honored that sentiment by playing like a band renewed, not merely reunited.

    You could see the pleasure — in the way Plant kicked at the base of his mike stand in “Ramble On,” sending it in an arc over his head ‘72-style, and in the big grin on Page’s face, blown up on the screen, as Bonham flew into the climactic drum thunder of “Black Dog.” For much of the show, even with a full, wide stage to themselves, Page, Plant and Jones stood in tight formation at the foot of the drum riser, often facing Jason, as if they were still in rehearsal. “I just want to have fun!” Plant barked at one point, as the band swerved from the extended, frenzied mid-section of “In My Time of Dying” back into the song’s blues-march backbone.

    Zeppelin did not walk or waltz through any of tonight’s sixteen songs. You could hear the care, the weeks of practice that started back in June, in the live debut of “For Your Life” from the 1976 album Presence, a song which, according to Plant in our recent cover story, the band tried in the first rehearsals but dropped after two days. Obviously, there was no staying away from its eccentric oceanic chop. There was no getting away from the warhorses either. “No Quarter” came with the obligatory dry ice. “There are certain things we had to do — this is one of them,” Plant said, almost in apology, introducing “Dazed and Confused.” Page was soon back in ancient ritual — pulling long wah-wah groans from his Gibson Les Paul with a violin bow under a rotating steeple of green-laser beams.

    More impressive, though, was the fresh tension in the song’s slow-drag sections as Page, Jones and Bonham pulled at the tempo, heightening the expectation between Page’s bent-note growls and Bonham’s thundercrack rolls with extra delay. “Stairway to Heaven” was also not quite its overfamiliar self, and refreshing for it, Page fingerpicking the opening motif and hitting the ringing twelve-string chords with a relaxed, folk-rock grace, echoing Plant’s thousand-yard stare as he sang “And it makes me wonder . . .” The inevitable “Whole Lotta Love,” the first encore, was almost identical to the second-album script except for a short, tantalizing passage of raw-blues argument after the whooping-theremin blowout — no drums, no bass, just Plant and Page’s guitar snapping at each other like junkyard dogs.

    Any doubts about Plant’s ability to still hit the high notes, his willingness to go stratospheric, was obliterated at the right, dramatic points in “Since I’ve Been Loving You” and “Kashmir.” Jones and Bonham locked in like family. And Page was a continual shock on guitar, mostly because he has played so little in public for the past decade. At sixty-three, Page is undiminished in his sorcerer’s mix of reckless ferocity — stammering runs, strangled howls, granite-block chords — and guitar-army wow. He recreated the harmonized-lick break in “Ramble On” with a sly blend of phasing and natural glide, and evoked the riff-orchestra swoop of “Achilles Last Stand” with a sustained rain of twelve-string harmonics. It was also clear why Page’s solo career has been one of fits and starts. In Led Zeppelin, Page built the perfect beast for his fury and ambitions. Last night, he cut and slashed against Jones’ percolating clavinet in “Trampled Underfoot” like an enraged butche, and matched Plant’s hairpin cries in the field-holler passages of “Nobody’s Fault But Mine” with a devils’ choir of distortion.

    At times, Zeppelin seemed to amaze themselves. “Spectacular!” crowed Plant, turning to Bonham with pride at the end of “Achilles Last Stand.” As the words “Led Zeppelin” filled the back screen, before the band left the stage for good, Bonham dropped to his knees and bowed, as if to say “I’m not worthy,” In fact, he was, in spades, pushing his elders — hard — in the circle dance “Misty Mountain Hop” and the steady, exotic ascension of “Kashmir.”

    It is only fair to point out that there were other performers on the bill, including Foreigner, Bad Company’s Paul Rodgers, Bill Wyman’s Rhythm Kings and members of Yes and Emerson Lake and Palmer — all squeezed into an hour’s potpourri to pay tribute to Ertegun and his reign at Atlantic, with varying historic accuracy. Rodgers got the first, major ovation of the night, but with a version of his 1969 hit with Free, “All Right Now.” Singer-songwriter Paolo Nutini — the youngest featured act by about twenty-five years — did his best with “Mess Around,” written by Ertegun for Ray Charles, then followed it with “Bang Bang (My Baby Shot Me Down),” a 1966 hit for Cher, an Atlantic artist, but on another label. Stranger still, Nutini sang it with a raspy, trilling effect that eerily called to mind a late-Sixties cover of the song by British singer Terry Reid — best known now for being the guy who turned down Page’s offer to be in Zeppelin and suggested Plant instead.

    It is also important to note that Zeppelin left the building wiithout making any reference to their future together, if there is one — no “See you next year!” or “Until next time . . .” The only message they left behind was, “We were the best — and still are.”


    This one is a very good read as well.
     
  21. Wilhelm-Scream Registered

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    Jimmy Page is God.
    That is all.
     
  22. Ahura Mazda Registered

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    His voice sounds pretty good but it is too bad the recording put on you tube is not the best quality. I hope they televise the whole concert.
     
  23. #1Batmanfan Registered

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    he sounds great kashmir gave me chills
     
  24. DV8 Band Loser

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    AW!!! They played Kashmir!?!?! :wow: even if they tour and make it to the states, I doubt they'll come close enough for me to see them (well, maybe Chicago), but every Tom, Dick and Harry will want to see them, and I'm sure the tickets will cost a pretty penny :(
     

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