??????What TPB or graphic novel do you think best represents??????

Discussion in 'Batman World' started by Comics N' Toons, Feb 4, 2008.

  1. Comics N' Toons Viva La Revolucion!

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    What TPB or graphic novel do you think best represents the Burton Movies...

    It is probably safe to say that the books that best represent the shumacher films are from the campy silver age i.e. 50's & 60's...


    What TPB or graphic novel best captures that timeless, Batman 1989 feel ????

    DON'T SAY BATMAN: THE MOVIES (those are just comic book adaptations of the films)....

    yes i know The Killing Joke served as inspiration for the 1st movie & that's too obvious...


    I THINK A DECENT CHOICE FOR MY MONEY WOULD BE:

    BATMAN GOTHIC by Grant Morrison

    WHAT ABOUT YOU....
     
  2. Cain Gentlebane

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    Batman Archives Vol. 1
     
  3. Superwoman Prime Damaged Beyond Repair

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    The comic counterparts of the Burtons films best capture the feel.
     
  4. RobC Registered

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    That's possibly the dumbest answer anyone could ever give to this question.

    On topic, I think the Strange Apparitions collection captures the feel quite nicely...
     
  5. BubbaGump Bland User

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    :up:

    Throw in a couple of Englehart stuff in there too.
     
  6. Doctor Baywatch Registered

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    "The Long Halloween" seems more like Burton/Keaton than Bale.

    At least for me.
     
  7. CFE The never-ending battle

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    Batman Archives Vol. 1
    Arkham Asylum: A Serious House on Serious Earth
    The Killing Joke

    ----

    CFE
     
  8. Superwoman Prime Damaged Beyond Repair

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    You're a little slow.
     
  9. RobC Registered

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    Uh-oh spagheti-o's.

    Allright you got me.
     
  10. union_jak Licky licky

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    Batman: Terror.

    It's the sequel to Batman: Prey. It stars Hugo Strange, Scarecrow and Catwoman. Ok, so Strange and Crane were never in Burton movies, but it has the look and feel of Batman Returns. In fact, I'm convinced Catwoman in Terror is based on Burton's Catwoman, from the costume to the exact positioning of images. I'll try and scan a page in to explain myself.
     
  11. RobC Registered

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    Awsome, that sounds good. I always wondered where Burton and co. got the idea for the fetishistic Catwoman costume from.
     
  12. Matt.S99 Formally batboy99

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    yes please scan a page, id love to see how catwoman looks

    could you scan a few pics please?
     
  13. Doctor Baywatch Registered

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  14. RobC Registered

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    Hmmmm, that's very similar isn't it. In both costumes for Batman and Catwoman. I guess this was used as some sort of base.

    Is it a Hugo Strange story?
     
  15. Doctor Baywatch Registered

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    It starts as a Hugo Strange story, but then it becomes more a Scarecrow story.
     
  16. Super_Ludacris Registered

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    I mean inspiration wise Burton said he considered TDKR.....Might not directly represent his films but its an inspiration....
     
  17. Doctor Baywatch Registered

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    I have never seen it in the movie. And not in Batman Begins. Burton's Batman is a silent creature of the night, Nolan's Batman (for me) is James Bond with a cape and Frank Miller's Batman is a 80s action hero, loud and violent.
     
  18. union_jak Licky licky

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    Compare these two.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Right before this one, Catwoman climbs on top of Batman, just like in Returns.
    [​IMG]

    The rooftop fights between Batman and Catwoman are soo influenced by Batman Returns, right down to Selina whipping Bruce so he falls off, and the way she calls him 'stud'.

    Batman also goes back to the alley next to the Monarch theatre from B89.

    I think it's an underrated little book personally.
     
  19. Matt.S99 Formally batboy99

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    the first one is obviously inspired by pfeiffer, and the second one too. I seen one of his covers, that used a keaton batman pic for referance


    btw, its that a good story? i may consdier picking it up
     
  20. union_jak Licky licky

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    I enjoyed it. It carries on from Prey, which is kinda like a sequel to Batman and the Monster Men in terms of Hugo Strange's story in the early days of Batman.

    The Scarecrow aspect picks up on what really happened to those school bullies from Scarecrow Year One (Batman Four of a Kind).

    Selina, as you can see, is great and I like the way they bridged Year One to The Long Halloween by making her hair length in between the two.

    There's not much more to the plot than that- Gordon features in it and Strange is just as obsessed with Batman than ever.
     
  21. RobC Registered

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    Seems like quite a good book, i've never heard of it before! I'm currently re-reading a Hugo Strange story re-printed in Strange Apparitions so I might look out for this one as well!
     
  22. Comics N' Toons Viva La Revolucion!

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    i love Hugo Strange
     
  23. RobC Registered

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    I'm still undecided, I need to read more I think.
     
  24. deathfromabove Registered

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    i agree that many aspects of TLH are reminiscent and likely inspired by burton's batman. most notably the tone and style of sale's artwork. the narrative , however, obviously inspired begins (and likely TDK) in story, tone, and character.

    alot of peole dont realize that batman '89 influenced the books quite heavily at the time and many aspects are still seeped into batman's mythology today.

    but on topic some other books that i always associate with the first movie are alot of breyfogle's stuff in detective at the time, some of kelley jones' more gothic stuff, and something people seem to be debating the dark knight returns.

    well, there is really no debate as burton himself (as well as the skarren and samm) has said both the dark knight and the killing joke were major inspiration. the use of the media clips, the tone of nearly dystopic decay in the city, and a dark brooding hero would likely have not come to pass if not for the splash TDKR made a few years prior. even the war in corto maltese is lifted directly from the book!

    same can be said for the killing joke's influence on the joker. those comparisons are much easier to draw and i will them to someone else.
     
  25. RobC Registered

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    Agreed, DKR is a massive influence, especially the way the media portrays the Batman.
     

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