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Which film do you think is the best batman film made so far

Batman 89 is brillent, so is BB, im still finding it hard to pick, BB is truer but Burton did actually improve a couple of things, no matter if fan boys want to admit it or not, I really love both of them, and MOTP... I cant pick but so ill just state that i hate B&R.
 
The real choice is obviously between B89 and BB (and maybe returns for some) i choose B89 purely because it is the more enjoyable movie it doesnt try so hard to be clever phycological and indie its purely a amazing movie with a group of great actors bringing a COMIC BOOK character to life.
 
Returns. Definitely Returns.

I must say I'm shocked at the results of the poll...in a good way.
 
The Dark Knight dosent com out till next year.
This is a pretty pointless poll cause we have had sooo many like this.

I voted for Begins
 
I dont think many of the BB fans use this part of the forum.


I'm a Batman fan and I rank BB had of Burton/Schumacher Bat-films that doesn’t mean I hate them expect Batman & Robin.

I do visit here cos It's part of BATMAN BOARD!
 
The best made Batman flick is undoubtedly Begins, speaking in technical aspects. The direction, writing, and acting were all top notch.

But I would say my favorite is Returns. Pfeiffer wasn't just acting, she was Catwoman. And I would also say that Returns arguably has the best score out of all Batman movies.
 
The best made Batman flick is undoubtedly Begins, speaking in technical aspects. The direction, writing, and acting were all top notch.

Technically, Begins is the best, but it's a little too regid and dry. Artistically, Returns is the pinnacle. The one I watch most is Forever, which had the best script. The definitive movie is Batman.
 
Technically, Begins is the best, but it's a little too regid and dry. Artistically, Returns is the pinnacle. The one I watch most is Forever, which had the best script. The definitive movie is Batman.

I agree with most points there, but I'm one of the people who thought that Begins is nearly flawless. It's not perfect, but it's close. :oldrazz:

But Returns, I love that movie to death. EDIT: And Returns easily has the best score out of all the movies.
 
Technically, Begins is the best, but it's a little too regid and dry.

I guess. I liked Begins a lot, but I just didn't care for the whole "lets ground Batman in reality" thing. You can ground The Punisher in reality but Batman works best in a fantasy environment. Let's face it, Nolan's Batman will never fight a character like Clayface nor will he join the Justice League in battle. Batman should be able to do all those things. Nolan is limiting the character.

Artistically, Returns is the pinnacle.

Exactly.

The one I watch most is Forever, which had the best script.

Forever has the best script, but its not the one I watch the most.

The definitive movie is Batman.

I agree with you, but I know most don't agree with us. At the end of the day it comes to interpretation. If you love Frank Miller and the Kane/Finger Batman than B89 is your film. If you like O'Neil and Adams then Mask of the Phantasm is your film. Even if its animated! And, if you like Jeph Loeb then Begins is your film.
 
1. World's Finest
2. Dead End
3. Legends
4. Mask of the Phantasm
5. Batman (89)

Honerable mention, Scooby Doo meets Batman and Robin, realy captured the essence of the Joker.
 

I wouldn't say it's crap, but it is both amusing and embarassing that some fans like to consider it a proper film and somehow superior to any of the other films. Simply because it copies the source material very closely and is very dark, the fans love it. Nevermind that it has no story and is just a demonstration of the director's abilities with action and costuming.
 
I'll give the guy props for mentioning the Scooby-Doo episode with Batman and Robin. :o
 
I guess. I liked Begins a lot, but I just didn't care for the whole "lets ground Batman in reality" thing. You can ground The Punisher in reality but Batman works best in a fantasy environment. Let's face it, Nolan's Batman will never fight a character like Clayface nor will he join the Justice League in battle. Batman should be able to do all those things. Nolan is limiting the character.

Begins is very much a film of it's time. Currently, the tastes are 'realism' and gritty, hard-hitting violence. Nolan's approach is all about convincing the viewer that Batman could exist. This, in itself, is problematic, because you don't need to do it. The audience already accepts, already buys, Batman, the Batmobile, the costume, and so on. You don't need to convince them to suspend disbelief for it, they want to, they pay to do so.

Story-wise, Nolan's approach works, telling you how Bruce Wayne built himself up to be Batman. Character-wise, it doesn't work, because it takes all the mystery away from the character. Burton knew that the Batmobile should just appear from nowhere, no idea where it came from or who could possibly have built it. That is far more effective. It suggests Batman has a hidden presence behind-the-scenes, and you don't know what to expect from him. And look at Keaton's face - there's no way he's going to let you in. That's why Kim Basinger's performance is so ideal. She reacts just the same way the audience reacts to everything.

Same with the main character. Nolan always lets the viewer know what Batman is thinking and where he is going. Burton shuts that off, and we see Bruce's crazy world thru the eyes of Vicki Vale, which IMO is a far better way to approach the character in a movie. The audience should empathise with Bruce, but he should never be an open book. And Batman should be, just like in that final shot of him watching the Batsignal, distant, alone, and heroic.
 
Begins is very much a film of it's time. Currently, the tastes are 'realism' and gritty, hard-hitting violence. Nolan's approach is all about convincing the viewer that Batman could exist. This, in itself, is problematic, because you don't need to do it. The audience already accepts, already buys, Batman, the Batmobile, the costume, and so on. You don't need to convince them to suspend disbelief for it, they want to, they pay to do so.

Story-wise, Nolan's approach works, telling you how Bruce Wayne built himself up to be Batman. Character-wise, it doesn't work, because it takes all the mystery away from the character. Burton knew that the Batmobile should just appear from nowhere, no idea where it came from or who could possibly have built it. That is far more effective. It suggests Batman has a hidden presence behind-the-scenes, and you don't know what to expect from him. And look at Keaton's face - there's no way he's going to let you in. That's why Kim Basinger's performance is so ideal. She reacts just the same way the audience reacts to everything.

Same with the main character. Nolan always lets the viewer know what Batman is thinking and where he is going. Burton shuts that off, and we see Bruce's crazy world thru the eyes of Vicki Vale, which IMO is a far better way to approach the character in a movie. The audience should empathise with Bruce, but he should never be an open book. And Batman should be, just like in that final shot of him watching the Batsignal, distant, alone, and heroic.

Agreed, great post.
 
Begins is very much a film of it's time. Currently, the tastes are 'realism' and gritty, hard-hitting violence. Nolan's approach is all about convincing the viewer that Batman could exist. This, in itself, is problematic, because you don't need to do it. The audience already accepts, already buys, Batman, the Batmobile, the costume, and so on. You don't need to convince them to suspend disbelief for it, they want to, they pay to do so.

Story-wise, Nolan's approach works, telling you how Bruce Wayne built himself up to be Batman. Character-wise, it doesn't work, because it takes all the mystery away from the character. Burton knew that the Batmobile should just appear from nowhere, no idea where it came from or who could possibly have built it. That is far more effective. It suggests Batman has a hidden presence behind-the-scenes, and you don't know what to expect from him. And look at Keaton's face - there's no way he's going to let you in. That's why Kim Basinger's performance is so ideal. She reacts just the same way the audience reacts to everything.

Same with the main character. Nolan always lets the viewer know what Batman is thinking and where he is going. Burton shuts that off, and we see Bruce's crazy world thru the eyes of Vicki Vale, which IMO is a far better way to approach the character in a movie. The audience should empathise with Bruce, but he should never be an open book. And Batman should be, just like in that final shot of him watching the Batsignal, distant, alone, and heroic.

Couldn't have said it better myself. I'll add that the Begins final scene was great too.

Lt. James Gordon: I never said thank you.
Batman: And you'll never have to.
 
I wouldn't say it's crap, but it is both amusing and embarassing that some fans like to consider it a proper film and somehow superior to any of the other films. Simply because it copies the source material very closely and is very dark, the fans love it. Nevermind that it has no story and is just a demonstration of the director's abilities with action and costuming.

I don't consider it (Dead End) a proper movie. I look at for what it is a Fan Film that's made to look like a trailer for a feature movie. But it has the feel and look of what I want to see in a Bat movie. I am a fan of the comics first, TAS captures that more than any movie. To think that the stories and look of TAS wouldn't play on the big screen is wrong imo. Kids went nuts for TAS for years. Spiderman is pretty dead on balls accurate with the costume and people ate up. And don't under estimate the nostalgia factor. My coworker printed out a picture she got emailed the other day, it was titled "For anyone over 40". It was a picture of Batman and Robin in the Batmobile from the series. That's the image the majority of people have of Bat's. (And I mean in terms of costume)
How can people knock something for copying the source in one case but knock other things for not following the source?
And as far as demonstrating the director's abilities with action and costuming, aren't those key elements of a movie?

But to make my pick seriously, Batman (89) is my favorite, Scooby Doo was just a joke. Hell they didn't even color in Batman's neck.
 
For Starters Batman and Robin should not be considered a batman film.I
Consider Batman,Batman Returns,and Batman Forever a trilogy.However
Batman the Animated series,and It spinoffs(TV and film) are better than
Forever.I would call Batman Begins the best however out of the previous trilogy I would signal Batman Returns as being the best.I understand The
Penquin being too much for some but at least he wasn't a ripoff of the Joker(which Is what Joel Scumacker die with the Villians he used) but you had the
real Catwoman In it.Michelle Pheiffer as Catwoman and Michael Keaton as Batman are better than anything In batman ForeverBatman IS obvisoulsy better than Forever but the Presence of Catwoman puts returns ahead In my book.
 

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