The Dark Knight Did anyone catch the subtle metaphore in the death scene?

Marvolo

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In the scene were Rachel and Harvey are tied up in their seperate locations did anyone else notice that Harvey was in light and Rachel was in the dark? Two opposites.

I think its neat, because its this scene that leads to the birth of two-face. Rachel's death leads to the darkness in Harvey and she is shrouded in darkness. And this is the last scene were we see the white knight Harvey, and he is shrouded in light in this scene.
 
I was wondering about that too. Nice thinking. :up:
 
interesting observation :yay:

there was so much of that throughout the entire film with the lighting and tone of scenes. more the BB i'd say :up:
 
Catch the parralels between the young Bruce scene with Alfred after his parents death in BEGINS compared to the dialogue and tone between the two characters after Rachel died? Very similar. Similar stroke of music to accompany the scene as well.
 
that reminds me of the final shot of the film as well, batman riding up into the light.
 
But yes, I also noticed the lights being on in Harvey's warehouse as opposed to darkness in Rachel's. On repeat viewing I took that for when I finally realized JOker gave him the wrong address. Dent was meant to be saved, and Rachel was always planned to die.
 
nolan always talks about how everything is thought out... it's all on screen in a specific way with intension... and i do believe you picked up on somethin' that i missed... nice one..
 
In the scene were Rachel and Harvey are tied up in their seperate locations did anyone else notice that Harvey was in light and Rachel was in the dark? Two opposites.

I think its neat, because its this scene that leads to the birth of two-face. Rachel's death leads to the darkness in Harvey and she is shrouded in darkness. And this is the last scene were we see the white knight Harvey, and he is shrouded in light in this scene.


Great observation.
 
The lack of lighting for Rachel's made it seem like something bad was coming for her in particular (like she wouldn't be saved to begin with), compared to Harvey and his well lit warehouse.
 
Nolan's film noir aesthetic. Put meaning in the frame. Did you guys catch the same sort of thing in the interrogation scene? When Gordon walks in the room it's complete darkness. Joker talks about Maroni's men in Gordon's unit, and the darkness seems to be engulfing him. Then when Batman is in the room - completely bright - the darkness is sucked out of the room - the Knight is here! Awesome, smart, genius movie!
 
The choice to go brightly lit in the interrogation room was a brilliant, unlikely move.
 
I noticed two other metaphors in the dark knight.

1)In the dinner scene between Bruce, Harvey, Rachel and the russian girl, Harvey talks about the "roman empire" and how when an enemy is at the gates, a citizen steps up to defend the city. Dent was alluding to Batman, but the metaphor I also see is that the "roman empire" he is referring to can be seen as Carmine Falcone's organized crime. With the void left from falcone leaving, someone needs to step in. Maybe Two Face?

2)Alfred explains how he caught the jewel thief, claiming he "burned the forest down," a Machivellian approach to doing what it takes to get the job down. Batman does this in many ways, but most shockingly through his unlawful invasion of privacy through cell phones.
 
I noticed two other metaphors in the dark knight.

1)In the dinner scene between Bruce, Harvey, Rachel and the russian girl, Harvey talks about the "roman empire" and how when an enemy is at the gates, a citizen steps up to defend the city. Dent was alluding to Batman, but the metaphor I also see is that the "roman empire" he is referring to can be seen as Carmine Falcone's organized crime. With the void left from falcone leaving, someone needs to step in. Maybe Two Face?

2)Alfred explains how he caught the jewel thief, claiming he "burned the forest down," a Machivellian approach to doing what it takes to get the job down. Batman does this in many ways, but most shockingly through his unlawful invasion of privacy through cell phones.
Yeah, there's a lot in there. Smartest wrting i've seen put to the screen in a long time.
 
Thank you everyone for posting other metaphors you all noticed. Some I had not noticed. I have seen the film 3 times now, and it is cool that new observations are coming out of it. Nolan has a way of shooting film so that you can find new stuff on repeat viewings.

Two I did not notice were:

1. Batman riding into the light at the end.
2. Alfred's line of "burning down the forest" in relation to Bruce's use of sonar system to catch The Joker.
 
Nolan's film noir aesthetic. Put meaning in the frame. Did you guys catch the same sort of thing in the interrogation scene? When Gordon walks in the room it's complete darkness. Joker talks about Maroni's men in Gordon's unit, and the darkness seems to be engulfing him. Then when Batman is in the room - completely bright - the darkness is sucked out of the room - the Knight is here! Awesome, smart, genius movie!
Totally right. Which is intersting visually, cause you think clown (the light), dark horrific giant bat (evil, the dark) ... but yeah, you actually feel even threatned for Gordon in that scene like the Joker could still off him. Then the lights go on ... WHAM ... Batman's here. haha
 
The choice to go brightly lit in the interrogation room was a brilliant, unlikely move.
And here is the thing about that scene. For starters, no other Batman actor who potrayed the character if they were to be thrust visually into the position of being in a brightly lit interrogation room could make their character work to go at it in that scene. Bale in the Bat-suit under bright lights, still makes the character leap off the screen with his intensity and ferocious nature. Bale makes Batman threatning in bright lights. haha

That's saying something.
 
Also- if you notice, there is a difference in the two speeches Gordon gives at the end...

In the eulogy for Dent he says- "He's not the hero we deserve, but he's the one we needed right now. He was a WHITE knight- shining and bright..."(something along those lines)

Then when speaking as Batman runs- "He's the hero we deserve...but NOT the one we need right now. So we'll hunt him, because he can take it. Because he's not a hero...He's a DARK knight."


The parallels, the comparison and the balance of the two- were brilliantly executed. And not something I even picked up on until the 2nd showing.

The screenwriting is just as brilliant in this film as the cinematography was.
 
How about the way Nolan draws parallels between Bruce and the Joker- specifically at Harvey's fundraiser?

Both make dramatic entrances with an entrouage.

Both address the crowd with the question-'where is Harvey Dent?'

Both toss champagne out of a glass in almost the exact same manner.

:cwink:
 
In the scene were Rachel and Harvey are tied up in their seperate locations did anyone else notice that Harvey was in light and Rachel was in the dark? Two opposites.

I think its neat, because its this scene that leads to the birth of two-face. Rachel's death leads to the darkness in Harvey and she is shrouded in darkness. And this is the last scene were we see the white knight Harvey, and he is shrouded in light in this scene.

:up:
 
Also while the coin for Gordon's son landed 'good heads' up meaning he would have lived, Two-Face himself landed scarred-side up...meaning death.

Nolan loves that kinda stuff.
 
Also while the coin for Gordon's son landed 'good heads' up meaning he would have lived, Two-Face himself landed scarred-side up...meaning death.

Nolan loves that kinda stuff.

To add to this, the coin's final flip had it fall on heads, meaning the scarred side would never likely see the light of day again. Similar to how Harvey, thanks to the cover up, landed "heads" up in the eyes of the citizens of Gotham, who would never see his other half.
 
To add to this, the coin's final flip had it fall on heads, meaning the scarred side would never likely see the light of day again. Similar to how Harvey, thanks to the cover up, landed "heads" up in the eyes of the citizens of Gotham, who would never see his other half.

Nicely put!
 
In the scene were Rachel and Harvey are tied up in their seperate locations did anyone else notice that Harvey was in light and Rachel was in the dark? Two opposites.

I think its neat, because its this scene that leads to the birth of two-face. Rachel's death leads to the darkness in Harvey and she is shrouded in darkness. And this is the last scene were we see the white knight Harvey, and he is shrouded in light in this scene.

GOOD point :up:
 
In regards to the script, something that I felt really reinforced the theme of duality (Batman/Bruce, Batman/Joker, Dark Knight/White Knight) was the repetition of lines under different circumstances.
1. "Remember that day when you told me that when Gotham would no longer need a Batman..." was said at the Dent fundraiser and when Rachel went to stay safe at Bruce's penthouse.
2. "Playing it close to the chest" line was said by Bruce to Fox about the govt contract and when Dent said that Gordon played his fake death close to his chest
3. "you either die a hero or..." dent at restaurant and batman at the end to gordon when he realizes to take the rap for two faces murders
4. "the hero we didnt deserve but needed" / "hero we deserve but dont need"

and so on...
 

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