In honor of Black History Month - 13 Black Truths

raybia

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Yes, believe it or not its black history month! (They come across so fast don't they?)

Well, if a thread already exists then I apologize and please merge.

With that said, please enjoy this link. I someone more tech savy than me would like to set up a youtube link please do so.

The comments expressed are not necessarily shared by myself or all blacks because we...SHOCKER... are not alike!

ENJOY!

http://www.salon.com/opinion/feature/2010/02/05/twib_black_facts/



Topic:
This Week in Blackness
Friday, Feb 5, 2010 14:50 EST
13 black truths
It's the 21st century, folks. You really ought to know this stuff Video
By Elon James White

Salon/iStockphoto

My mother is very light-skinned.

Upon glancing at my own complexion, you might not guess that I am the offspring of such a light-skinned black woman. If Harry Reid had met her at the right time he might have tried to get her to run for office. (Dead horse? Still-a-beating.) My mother really doesn't have any traces of a Negro dialect (We all know what he meant) although, on occasion, I'll hear her try to replicate one and it's tremendously funny. She sounds pretty much exactly the same as she does normally, but when she's getting "black" she'll add a "girl" or "chile" to the mix. There was an incident when I was child when my mom was forced to curse someone out and she started her diatribe with "You, sir, are an *******." Hilarity and amazingly placed F words ensued.

Joyce Elaine White is a handful and has very strong opinions. Such strong opinions that I took them to be facts.

Facts about blackness.

I remember one particular trip to the barbershop when I was 9 years old. My mom explained to the barber what style she thought would be best suited for her young Nubian prince (Yes. She absolutely, with zero hint of sarcasm, referred to me as that.) The barber upon examining my hair said, "Aww, he got that good hair." My mother didn't respond at all. After we left the barbershop she pulled me aside and explained to me, in no uncertain terms, that the barber, who I thought had complimented me, was terribly misguided. She wanted me to know that there wasn't any such thing as "good hair." What he meant was that my hair was closer to straight, more like my white teachers at school. "This does not make your hair 'better' than people with curlier hair. That's how black people's hair is naturally."

And that was that.

I didn't consider the concept again for years. Joyce Elaine White's explanation as to why the barber had said what he said and then why he was wrong made perfect sense. As an adult, when I found out that people still classified types of hair like that, and used it in order to put others or themselves down, I was dumbfounded. It's the '00s and people are still conforming to such antiquated thought processes? Next thing you know someone will come along and tell me that I "talk white" or something.

And it has happened. Numerous times.

I've heard it from blacks, whites, Asians and Hispanics. I sound "white." When pressed on what they mean by such a statement I've heard every thing from "Black people don't talk like that" to "No, no, no, I'm just sayin' you sound smart."

It's the 21st century, folks.

I'm always shaking my head and gasping at what I deem to be an incredible amount of ignorance shown when categorizing folks. I judge because I'm constantly pondering "who thinks like this? Who still doesn't know that these ideas are not OK?" Hence the idea behind me writing "13 Black Truths." In an attempt to create a conversation (and also to head off any super-ignorant **** people might think it reasonable to say to me) I've compiled 13 things that I sort of take for granted as being widely accepted and yet, in the year 2010, they still cause debate. The latest "This Week in Blackness (Mini Edition)" lays them out.
 
Wow, BHM isn't what it use to be.
 
I feel like I should say something meaningful or insightful here, but I got nothing.
 
What I think is funny is no matter if you believe in creation or evolution all human life comes out of north Africa.....we are all African by decent some of our ancestors just walked a little farther. It's kinda like celebrating Columbus Day and the fact that he "discovered" America, never mind the hundreds of thousands native indians that already knew where they live existed. People are so close minded and always look for a way to separate themselves from each other to justify how they choose to believe or live. Besides history is history no matter what shade you are, I have never met a white man or a black man just many shades of beige and brown. Oh and there is just one truth and we have yet to discover it.
 
I think nowadays anything celebrating blackness is either just pushed to the wayside, used as an excuse to party, or accused of some black power agenda to beat down whitey. We need to just do a reboot of the whole thing.
 
I think nowadays anything celebrating blackness is either just pushed to the wayside, used as an excuse to party, or accused of some black power agenda to beat down whitey. We need to just do a reboot of the whole thing.

How about including black history and the contributions that every ethnic group has made into the American history textbooks then black history would be taught throughout the year eliminating the need for BHM.

Now that's a novel idea!
 
I'll be honest with this. I don't agree with black history month. It subconsciously creates a small window for black history. I think a better proposition would be to teach history in school much better than they do, but I'm not so naive to think that would be a reality without a major revolution.
 
Anything that involves us specifically is going to be viewed as pandering or just being politically correct, that's the thing.
 
I'll be honest with this. I don't agree with black history month. It subconsciously creates a small window for black history. I think a better proposition would be to teach history in school much better than they do, but I'm not so naive to think that would be a reality without a major revolution.

That's what the 365 movement is all about. Black History should not be something that is only acknowledge one month every year. Black History is in fact American history and it should be taught year round.

Sadly the most taught about African American contributions to the united states is MLK, Harriet Tubman, and George Washington Carver and his magical peanuts. Any attempt to teach more than that is met with STRONG resistance by parents and some students.
 
My second grade teacher was a black woman, and when BHM rolled around, she had everyone do presentations on famous figures in black history. Most kids picked MLK of course, but me and the one other black kid in class were forced by my teacher to choose someone less well-known. Let's just say I knew from a relatively young age who Frederick Douglass was.

My next black teacher to teach History was in the 7th grade. She was also the staff advisor for the International Club, which I joined that year. She was great in that not only did she cover black history throughout the school year, but she covered a lot of minority groups in history at the same time. Plus, I got out of some of my afternoon classes by joining the International Club's assembly show. I read a poem by Langston Hughs to the school, and I got to watch the Polynesian girls do this one coconut dance...

Anyway, my next black teacher for a History class was in the 11th grade. Though really, she was half black and half Filipino. She also had a way of teaching history that ignored BHM and just included minority contributions in her lessons.
 
I would love to see a kid say that their favorite black hero is Toussaint L'Ouverture or Nat Turner. That would be hilarious when they explain who they were, and then some *******s try to tell them that they weren't real heroes but terrorists. It really bothers me that history ignores slave revolts just like they did back during slavery.
 
i would love to see a kid say that their favorite black hero is toussaint l'ouverture or nat turner. That would be hilarious when they explain who they were, and then some *******s try to tell them that they weren't real heroes but terrorists. It really bothers me that history ignores slave revolts just like they did back during slavery.

qft....
 
My grandfather had a great story about him breaking up a meeting with Nat Turner. He said that he was in college, he went to Morehouse, and he was at a seminar. The lecturer asked him who his hero was, and he said it was Nat Turner. The lecturer then said, "Are you sure? You know he killed people right?" My grandfather told her, ""Of course he did. He was oppressed as a slave, and he wanted to break free of his people's affliction. It's no different from what George Washington did, yet you tell me to praise him." He said that everybody left the meeting. lol
 
They've been trying to make movies about Nat Turner and toussaint l'ouverture for years, but not surprisingly it hasn't happened. Hell it took huge donations from Oprah, Bill Cosby, Michael Jordan and others to even get Malcolm X made.

Sadly until films are made about those men you're not going to hear many people talking about them and as time goes on they'll become more and more obscure figures in history.
 
They've been trying to make movies about Nat Turner and toussaint l'ouverture for years, but not surprisingly it hasn't happened. Hell it took huge donations from Oprah, Bill Cosby, Michael Jordan and others to even get Malcolm X made.

Sadly until films are made about those men you're not going to hear many people talking about them and as time goes on they'll become more and more obscure figures in history.

Yet Hollywood can make movies about Charles Manson and Christopher Columbus who was one of the greatest mass murders of all time.
 
They don't want them to incite "black power" riots.
 
Saying that Christopher Columbus discovered America is like giving credit to some schmo tomorrow for discovering *********ion. It's a pretty ******ed idea.
 
Saying that Christopher Columbus discovered America is like giving credit to some schmo tomorrow for discovering *********ion. It's a pretty ******ed idea.

And yet they teach it to every child in elementary school. :doh:
 
Black History Month is October in the UK.
I think nowadays anything celebrating blackness is either just pushed to the wayside, used as an excuse to party, or accused of some black power agenda to beat down whitey. We need to just do a reboot of the whole thing.
I vote Christopher Nolan for the job :woot:

Its funny I just saw a re-run of Louis Theroux Weird Weekends from 1999 where he meets the black nationalists movement. He went on protests and hung out with Al Sharpten.
 

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