Your Favorite Spider-Man Animated Show

Discussion in 'Spidey-World' started by UltimateWebhead, Jun 27, 2014.

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Your favorite Spider-Man animated show

  1. Spider-Man (1967-1970)

  2. Spider-Man (1981-1982)

  3. Spider-Man and His Amazing Friends (1981-1983)

  4. Spider-Man (1994-1998)

  5. Spider-Man Unlimited (1999-2001)

  6. Spider-Man The New Animated Series (2003)

  7. The Spectacular Spider-Man (2008-2009)

  8. Ultimate Spider-Man (2012-present)

Multiple votes are allowed.
Results are only viewable after voting.
  1. zeptron Registered

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    I still think if it hadn't been cancelled it could have given Batman TAS a run for it's money.

    One thing I do think it has over Batman TAS is that it does serialized storytelling. Each episode was part of arc and somehow connected to another episode. So it's not like you can just watch the episodes in any order. Whereas Batman TAS had a lot of stand alone episodes. And most of them could be watched in any order.
     
  2. Pfeiffer-Pfan Cool Rider

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    I actually think that's a plus for Batman: The Animated Series. The ''mini-movie'' format has kept it accessible and easily digestible for contemporary viewers (young and old alike).

    You could pick any random episode of B:TAS in order to entice a prospective viewer, but let's say, if we were to look through 90's X-Men, it's so convoluted and serialized that the person would have to start at the pilot, which is certainly off-putting with it's wonky animation.

    Certainly in this age of Netflix and binge-watching, B:TAS works wonders. Plus, we got 15 years of continuity with this version of Batman anyway.
     
  3. Lantern Venom Lego SUCKS

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    I can't agree that character designs need to be simplistic to enhance the animation. Moreover, if that was SSM's intention, then it still failed. A perfect example is the symbiote-controlled Spidey fighting the Sinister 6. It was a massive battle, but there was little evidence of that when the villains were defeated. There were no bruises, blood, or broken bones despite the alien's natural aggression. The closest thing the viewers got to battle damage were some weak smoke tendrils coming from Rhino. That's not mature storytelling.

    And don't even get me started on how horrible Doc Ock looked. Even on a show with characters who walked on legs that looked like stalks and eyes so big they would be home in a Monster High movie, Ock looked like Lou Costello in sunglasses.


    Your citation of Weisman's plans for the show only proves my point. A truly definitive Spiderman show couldn't just rely on a few years of his life, no matter how well the school years would be done. It couldn't be afraid to produce stories that revolved around Peter having money problems, marrying and subsequently having martial issues with Mary Jane, or the stillborn baby. While I don't think it would be necessary to do the OMD storyline, all of the major storylines before that would have to be done to some degree.
     
  4. Joined:
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    With all due respect people we are talking about children's animation. Neither B:TAS or SSM ever really reached out beyond the core base of children ages 0-11 and passionate fans of these characters like yourselves. They may be the shows that impressed many people but they're hardly a world wide phenominon on the scale of even the likes of Arrow or The Flash.

    That's not a dig at these two shows at all, they impressed the small target audience they had greatly.
     
  5. Joined:
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    While this is entirely subjective I think SSM had poor animation visually. The action and flow of movement itself was awesome but the art itself actually was so bad it put me off watching it for ages.
     
  6. Pfeiffer-Pfan Cool Rider

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    That's a rather ridiculous statement.

    First of all, you really shouldn't be comparing animation and live-action as they are two different animals. Back in the early 90's, animation was just starting to break free of the notion that it was just ''kid's entertainment''.

    Bruce Timm and others have gone on record saying that while the show was hugely successful with the 6-11 demographic, it also attracted a large teenage and young adult audience. Some of whom where in University and hadn't read a comic book in their life.

    Batman: The Animated Series premiered in prime-time and went on to win a significant primetime emmy award for Outstanding Animated Program. That kind of recognition for a kid's ''action-adventure'' cartoon was and is extremely rare.

    It spawned a continuity that lasted 16 years and studios are still using elements from it today (Such as the constant employment of Kevin Conroy).

    No... it's hardly F.R.I.E.N.D.S or The X Files, but it is still a significant achievement that goes beyond kid's nonsense resigned to the dustbin of the 90's (A designation more fitting for X-Men or Spider-Man: The Animated Series).
     
  7. UltimateWebhead Black's the new Red&Blue

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    Well, you don't have to agree. When working within the limits of a budget, certain choices have to be made. Cook and Weisman made the decision to have a Spider-Man that actually moves. To do this, they scaled back the designs of the characters to have less lines which facilitated easier more fluid animation. Whether you agree or not is irrelevant.

    It's really difficult to follow your logic. So...the animation failed because it didn't show bruises, blood, and broken bones and then you say it isn't mature storytelling because of that? Ok. First, the animation didn't fail imo and even if it did, showing battle damage has no effect on whether or not animation is or is not a success. Second, mature storytelling also doesn't revolve around 'battle damage.' A mature storyline is showing a kid getting addicted to drugs because of his abusive father. Or being irresponsible with power. Or about learning how to juggle the many responsibilities of daily life. Your opinions on the topics of storytelling and animation are indeed polar opposite of mine. I can't even follow your line of thinking here.

    Not sure how we got onto this from that last paragraph, but, ok....

    What was that point again exactly? Weisman's plans for the show were simply taking what Lee, Ditko and Romita did and put it up on the screen for us. For those reading those early stories of Peter and Spider-Man, the readers got to 'grow up' with Peter. They watched him mature in a natural progression over the years. That is how Weisman planned on doing the show. It was a progression that would have taken Peter through his life and we would have been able to watch it one step at a time. So, if anything, it invalidates what you are arguing because they weren't going to shy away from the many moments in Peter's life. Weisman and Co already showed great care and verisimilitude with the early years of his life covering several of the great stories, showing the difficulties of being both Peter and Spider-Man, money issues included and imo no doubt they would have continued that notion with his progressing storyline.

    With all due respect that is quite short-sighted of you. It's a shame that somehow simply because something is 'animated' it gets tossed aside as nothing more than a 'children's' show. Quality comes in all degrees. There are many animated productions that feature better storytelling, character development, and overall writing than many live-action or 'adult' movies/shows. Being animated shouldn't necessarily have any bearing on the quality of a production but unfortunately that is a stigma that is associated with it. Many people miss out because of that thought process. Then again, just because something is widely popular doesn't equate to being better.
     
  8. bigdaddy313 Registered

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    So true my man, so true.

    This needs to be addressed through the media to the public and all companies and it's third parties associated with animation in general, it's a big problem in the west.
     
  9. Lantern Venom Lego SUCKS

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    Therein lies one of the major problems for Spidey in animation: budget. Our central disagreement was whether SSM could be considered definitive. The constraints of budget hindered it, so that its a "no" before we can even get to the show's innovative aspects. Every Spidey animated show has had some kind of hindrance like this. Even the 90s show, which I consider the best of the bunch, had to bear the burden of being kid-friendly. That not only hampered Spidey's fight scenes, but it led to several characters like Carnage being gutted. I don't expect this to change with any Spidey 'toons in the near future since Ultimate Spidey's slapstick-over-substance style has been successful.

    In terms of visuals for a definitive Spidey animated show, I'd like to see something along the lines of the new Justice League animated movies. They manage to combine realistic anatomy with fluid, fast-paced motion. DC hasn't shyed away from shocking moments like Reverse Flash getting a hole blown in his head, Hal Jordan getting his arm broken by Darkseid, a man admitting that he cross-dressed as Wonder Woman, or Cyborg's excruciating transformation. A truly definitive Spidey show would need both the monetary commitment and the vision to be truly faithful to the comics, even when that calls for being not kid-friendly. I'm not sure we'll ever see that.
     
    #109 Lantern Venom, Apr 3, 2015
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2015
  10. Slade W "Who Is Slade?"

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    94-98 show for me. It was great and gave very good portrayals of a lot of the characters.
     
  11. MrSpyder Spider-Man's in the MCU

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    Miss this guy as Spidey

    [YT]xm87x-GKIy4[/YT]
     
  12. UltimateWebhead Black's the new Red&Blue

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    All tv productions have budgets. This isn't something new. It only emphasizes the ability of TSSM's creators to utilize the money available to best suit the needs of the show. IMO, they succeeded in their presentation and produced the best animated rendition of Spider-Man. But the animation itself is only a scratch on the surface of how TSSM is a definitive show for the ol' webhead. TSSM does possess the vision of being faithful to the comics--I don't see it any other way. Changes were made as in all adaptations, however they kept the spirit of those original stories intact and the characters as well. They remained faithful to the classics while updating for a contemporary show.

    The 90's show suffered from both the overbearing sensors and it's character designs. More lines, more realism, equals less fluid movement. Shows being produced today have less issues with this but that's to be expected. Technology improves and so does the cost.

    But at least we agree on the USM cartoon. It's complete lack of substance has me thinking we won't get another quality Spidey animated production for quite some time.

    Again, I don't see how showing some broken bones aides in making or not making a case against a show being definitive. Those types of shallow items do nothing to detract from how great the S6 fight in Group Therapy is for example. Like I said before, 'shocking moments' don't have an effect on the success of the animation nor are what I would consider a part of mature storytelling. You bring up "Cyborg's excruciating transformation." I had to rewatch that because I had forgotten it. IMO, the transformation of Connors into the Lizard and Marko into the Sandman in TSSM are very comparable to Cyborg's.

    I feel like we are repeating ourselves. We simply don't agree. For me, TSSM is the best Spider-Man related adaptation in any medium outside of 616. I have some minor quibbles with the show but otherwise I am very happy with it. I'd also love it for another show to come along and best TSSM, as I'm all about progress and wanting the best for Spidey. Unfortunately, as we've both stated, that doesn't seem to be a possibility--at least for the time being. That said, even though we don't agree on what 'definitive' entails, it's my hope that as a fellow webhead, you eventually get your 'definitive' show :yay:
     
  13. TheOriginalOne Registered

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    How I'd rank the animated shows:

    1- Spectacular Spider-Man
    2- Spider-Man: The Animated Series
    3- Ultimate Spider-Man
    4- Spider-Man: The NEW Animated Series

    That's about all I've seen. :oldrazz:
     
  14. Lantern Venom Lego SUCKS

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    65 episodes isn't nearly enough to do Spider-man justice, but it was a very good effort. At least the show didn't get abruptly nixed like SSM.

    At least you got a Bluray release with this show. I just saw it recently, and I'll probably pick it up if the price comes down slightly. The '94 series only has a few multi-episode releases, but no complete series Blurays or DVDs in the US. I really need to spring for a region-free disc player.
     
    #114 Lantern Venom, Apr 5, 2015
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2015
  15. UltimateWebhead Black's the new Red&Blue

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    If there's one reason I am thankful for ASM2, it's the release of TSSM on Blu-ray. Nothing more than Sony using ASM2 hitting the theaters as an excuse to try and earn some extra cash by putting TSSM out there in HD. You'll get no complaints from me though--no matter the reason, I'm happy to have the series on BR.

    I've never understood why they do full releases in some regions and partial releases in others. Like you mentioned the 90' series has partial releases in the US but the entire series is available on DVD in the UK. Even fans of USM are getting shafted in the US. They released a DVD collection of only about 12 episodes from the 1st season here, but again in the UK, the entire 1st season is available on DVD.

    I own the entire 90's series digitally. I'm ok with that for now but as an 'old-school' guy, I prefer to own hard copies so if they ever do release the 90's show on BR, I'll be picking it up for sure.
     
  16. Murdock Registered

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    I can't tell you how much I love The Spectacular Spider-Man. Just a brilliant show. I loved the 90's when I was a kid, but it just does not hold up for me. All the other one's are kind of forgettable, imo. Except the 60's show. Still like it for nostalgia. But, Spec is my favorite adaptation of the web-head.
     
  17. Doctor Octopus Registered

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    Agreed with Lantern Venom that Spider-Man TAS had best animation and character designs.
     
  18. Sarcastic Fan King of Hell

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    I won't argue with you about the character designs (I'm not a fan of them), but the animation? Okay, I wrote this back in 2008, time for a re-post.

    Mostly because I am tired of having to constantly type and re-type this in various threads. I have studied the animation industry for some time, and more than that, I have contacts in the industry who have been working there for decades. Writers, producers, story board artists and even voice actors. I don't work there myself, but I consider myself as much of an expert as one can be without actually working in it, though I hope that eventually changes.

    Why does "The Spectacular Spider-Man" look the way it does? Why are the models so streamlined and stylized when we grew up with cartoons where the character models were very detailed?

    The answer is this, it is easier to animate and to animate well. To those who keep on citing shows like "G.I. Joe", "He-Man", and other shows from that era, take off the nostalgia tinted glasses and go back and actually look at them. The character models look good when they are static, but the animation is really slow and lousy.

    When Bruce Timm first set out to produce "Batman: The Animated Series", people complained about his streamlined character models, I know it might not seem like it considering how universally praised he is today, but it was not the case. Why did he do that? Because he knew you got better animation out of it. Less lines to draw means less lines to animate, especially on a TV budget.

    If you want those detailed models and good animation, you need the budget of a feature length Disney movie, and even then it's still not a good idea.

    When "Gargoyles" was in production, the character models were a lot more detailed. Frank Paur came in and streamlined them with artists in Japan, and the result was something beautiful. But, to those who still complain about "The Spectacular Spider-Man" not looking like this, I can guarantee you that "Gargoyles" had a much higher budget than "Spidey" does. Hell, look what happened in the third season when the budget was slashed, the models were the same, but the animation was painfully ugly to watch.

    Now, Spider-Man is a character that moves. The fights are fast paced, the web slinging is fast paced, and the animation on this show is just fluid, fast and gorgeous. The aerial battle with the Vulture was breathtaking, especially for TV. Now, some will point out the Fox Kids series, but, well, honestly, look at it again. It was not all that well animated. It was full of bad CGI backgrounds, the color palette was not working, and the show was mostly stock footage. It just did not look good.

    When you draw a comic book, you are drawing still images that don't have to move. You can add all the detail you want, as long as you meet your deadline. Animation doesn't have that luxury. Thousands of cels go into animating a twenty-two minute production. It is a long and grueling process, and the schedule is very tight.

    It is easy to be an arm chair animation producer. Just because you watch a lot of it doesn't make you an expert. I've seen so many statements made on animation and "today's technology" coming from people who just don't know what they're talking about. It's not about being lazy. It's not about dumbing animation down. It's about producing the best animation they possibly can on a budget.
     
  19. Joined:
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    Fair Point. I was wrong about Batman
     
  20. Decepticonus Registered

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    Those CGs though were pretty lame. I understand it was still early in its time. That and I think the backgrounds in regards to cars driving around looked crappy. Not sure, have to watch it again.
     
  21. PeterBenParker Wallopin' Websnappers!

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    My List:

    1. The Spectacular Spider-Man (2008-2009)
    2. Spider-Man (1994-1998)
    3. Spider-Man The New Animated Series (2003)
    4. Spider-Man (1967-1970)
    5. Spider-Man Unlimited (1999-2001)
    6. Ultimate Spider-Man (2012-present)
    7. Spider-Man (1981-1982)
    8. Spider-Man and His Amazing Friends (1981-1983)
    :spidey:
     
  22. ImSGirl95 Doreen Green

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    Voted for the 90s. Still my favourite, and grew up with it! :)
     
  23. UltimateWebhead Black's the new Red&Blue

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    The 90's show is 2nd on my list, but I often find myself going back and rewatching episodes. I actually completed a full watch-thru of the series about a year ago. I'd love to see a proper release on Blu ray.
     
  24. Havok83 Registered

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    I accidentally voted for Spider-Man Unlimited but meant Spider-Man The New Animated Series. I didnt like the show when it originally aired but gained a new appreciation for it now as an adult. Its so sad that it was shortlived
     
  25. zeptron Registered

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    I thought the New Animated Series was okay, however I felt that it wrote itself into a corner trying to have it in the same continuity as the movies. There was also the lack of important characters like Aunt May. And too many original villains. Some being knock offs of villains from the comics.
     

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