Cast A Metal Gear Solid Movie

Discussion in 'Misc. Films' started by neobido9999, Jul 27, 2005.

  1. neobido9999

    neobido9999 Registered

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2004
    Messages:
    1,180
    Likes Received:
    0
    Solid Snake...Hugh Jackman

    Liquid Snake...Sean Bean

    Solidus Snake...Bruce Willis

    Otacon...Ryan Phillippe

    Big Boss...Clint Eastwood

    Big Boss (younger)...Eric Bana

    Revolver Ocelot...Daniel Day Lewis
     
  2. The Amazing Lee

    The Amazing Lee Don't call me chicken!

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2003
    Messages:
    41,137
    Likes Received:
    3
    seems plausible
     
  3. neobido9999

    neobido9999 Registered

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2004
    Messages:
    1,180
    Likes Received:
    0
    Director - Paul Greengrass
     
  4. The Amazing Lee

    The Amazing Lee Don't call me chicken!

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2003
    Messages:
    41,137
    Likes Received:
    3
    Possibly,he has good credits....but I dunno.
     
  5. ddubbz08

    ddubbz08 Registered

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2005
    Messages:
    57
    Likes Received:
    0
    good lineup, who will be vamp-the villian fron XXX or Raiden-Owen Wilson? But good lineup
     
  6. hippie_hunter

    hippie_hunter The King is Back!

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2003
    Messages:
    53,331
    Likes Received:
    0
    Solid Snake: Christian Bale
    Liquid Snake: Christian Bale
    Solidus Snake: Christian Bale
    Big Boss/Naked Snake: Christian Bale
     
  7. Timstuff

    Timstuff Registered

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2004
    Messages:
    19,920
    Likes Received:
    1
    Solid Snake, Liquid Snake, and Big Boss (aka "Naked Snake") are all supposed to have the same face. Shouldn't they be played by the same actor? :confused:

    Solid Snake/Liquid Snake: Eric Bana
    Colonel Campbell: Gene Hackman
    Hal "Otacon" Emmerich: Alessandro Nivola
    Gray Fox/Cyborg Ninja: Cole Houser
    Revolver Ocelot: Gary Oldman
     
  8. Savage

    Savage Earth Rocker

    Joined:
    May 12, 2002
    Messages:
    22,213
    Likes Received:
    0
    THERE WE GO! That right there is the cast I want!:D
     
  9. hippie_hunter

    hippie_hunter The King is Back!

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2003
    Messages:
    53,331
    Likes Received:
    0
  10. Timstuff

    Timstuff Registered

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2004
    Messages:
    19,920
    Likes Received:
    1
    Bale was already Batman. Let someone else have a go at Solid Snake.

    And before you mention Hulk in regards to Eric Bana, keep in mind that playing Bruce Banner hardly compares to donning an iconic hero's costume. We don't need two iconic heroes to be played by the same guy IMO. I think Bana is the best choice.
     
  11. hippie_hunter

    hippie_hunter The King is Back!

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2003
    Messages:
    53,331
    Likes Received:
    0
    Solid Snake is nowhere near comparable to Batman or the Hulk
     
  12. Elijya

    Elijya Registered

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2003
    Messages:
    38,219
    Likes Received:
    0
    on the original NES, the pictures used for Snake, Campbell, and Big Boss, were obviously borrowed photos of Kurt Russel, Richard Crenna and Sean Connery
     
  13. Riggs15382

    Riggs15382 Registered

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2005
    Messages:
    1,565
    Likes Received:
    0
  14. hippie_hunter

    hippie_hunter The King is Back!

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2003
    Messages:
    53,331
    Likes Received:
    0
  15. Psycho Hulk

    Psycho Hulk Registered

    Joined:
    May 2, 2003
    Messages:
    6,540
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hideo got the idea for Solid Snake from Snake Plissken(Kurt Russel) because of his love for the Escape from...movies...Kurt Russel can still kick some ass
     
  16. Elijya

    Elijya Registered

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2003
    Messages:
    38,219
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm not so sure. Solid and Pliskin are very different characters, though they may perform some of the same feats. Pliskin fights the government in a chaotic society. Solid works FOr the government taking down terrorists. Pliskin's all about being a psychotic badass, Solid is a soldier and strategic
     
  17. Psycho Hulk

    Psycho Hulk Registered

    Joined:
    May 2, 2003
    Messages:
    6,540
    Likes Received:
    0
    Pyscho Mantis:Crispin Glover
    [​IMG]
     
  18. Psycho Hulk

    Psycho Hulk Registered

    Joined:
    May 2, 2003
    Messages:
    6,540
    Likes Received:
    0
    Look wise and all. That's another reason why Solid Snake's fake name he gave Raiden was "Plissken".

    Wrong Interview. ><
     
  19. Elijya

    Elijya Registered

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2003
    Messages:
    38,219
    Likes Received:
    0
    "interview"? :confused:
     
  20. Psycho Hulk

    Psycho Hulk Registered

    Joined:
    May 2, 2003
    Messages:
    6,540
    Likes Received:
    0
    003 : Escape from New York

    We are now entering round 3 of this column. I have talked about The Great Escape and The Guns of Navarone - classics of the 60s. Obviously, I did not see them at real time. I saw them on the small TV in the living room instead of on the big screen at the movies. The process was not really an active effort of "watching" but more of a passive experience of "seeing" what happened to be shown on the TV. This was how I encountered many movies in my childhood. But it was these coincidental encounters that created the foundation within myself. I grew up and then became able to experience film "actively" by going to the movies by myself. This time I would like to talk about a film I saw not on TV but at the movies, based on my own will. And the 3rd film turns out to be the movie that influenced me the most in the birth of MGS hero Solid Snake - Escape from New York (the Japanese title was New York 1997).

    In Spring 1981, I was a high school student. I went to the movies with my friends. Considering myself an avid film fan, I certainly knew of John Carpenter. Although I did have him in mind, I was not a worshipper yet. The lights were turned down, and the film began. Only text is shown on the black screen. A calm melody with a monotone rhythm, analog electric sounds... a simple and even tasteless opening - but I was drawn to it. My skin could feel the unique atmosphere and what was about to happen. Then came a brief description of the setting (Manhattan Island turned into a prison). There is no room for questions for such a wild setting. A computer voice talks emotionlessly about how the future will be in the next 10-20 years. All this time the audience gets no live footage. All the audience can do is imagine based on the data and wire frame (actually models whose edges are colored with fluorescent paint). Various images of the future flood the minds of the audience and cause a mental panic. The next cut shows a panoramic view of Manhattan the prison. "This is gonna be great!" The next hour and a half, I was glued to the innovative idea and punk atmosphere. "How could such a cool movie exist!" It wasn't simply a fun movie. The movie and I shared similar chemistry. The colors, the smell, and the air were things that the director and I shared in taste. There is no logical explanation. I believe everyone has had this kind of experience with music and film. It might not have been a movie popular among the public, but it was definitely the movie I got into the most.

    I was especially electrified by the hero, Snake Plissken. Being in the midst of my rebellious period, the antihero "Snake" resonated harmoniously! He was a dark hero that separated himself from the orthodox hero who was either part of some organization, enslaved by the system, or was justice personified. Noire novels and stories and movies with evil heroes are common now, but this was quite rare back then. Although he gets used, he ultimately lives by his own ideology. Although confined as a criminal, he was not truly evil. Instead, he was a new type of hero with "justice not bound by others." Snake's words, actions and every move looked so cool. I'm sure that when people came out of the theatre, they were all dragging their right leg just like Snake (who gets injured by an arrow). My friends and I were no exception. (By the way, I had one eye shut like Mel Gibson after seeing "Mad Max 2.") The line "Call me Snake!" became a fad in school.

    The name 'Snake' in MGS comes from "creeping up on someone silently like a snake." The adjective 'Solid' expresses Snake's strong and blade-sharp image - paradoxical when combined with a snake's litheness. Normally, 'snake' and 'solid' do not get along. It's like talking about hot ice. I came up with this name to express this lack of balance and equilibrium. But when I decided that the codename would be Snake, the character itself was more Plissken than snake-like at the subconscious level. If I used a different name (animal) for Snake in MGS, he probably would have been a totally different character.

    This movie is another example that contains the very important synopsis element of "infiltration, rescue, and escape". What adds greatly to the suspense is the 24-hour "time limit". What plays a big role as a direction tool is his very obvious watch. You could ask, "Does it really have to be this big?" but showing this watch instead of an on-screen timer works really well. Snake takes a look at his watch at the very moment the audience wishes to take a look. The time is not spoken. The audience has to read the time just like Snake. Towards the end when it is only minutes away from the limit, the watch is no longer shown. Only Snake's facial expression is shown. It is a mean but calculated means of direction. Carpenter is great with such small touches. The device indicating the president's location, the cassette tape necessary at the summit, the bracelet with the hidden switch, the nanocapsule that dissolves in blood and causes and explosion, the diving glider, the egg-shaped escape pod... the cool use of all these neat gadgets adds to the enjoyment of this film.

    The reason why New York is the setting of MGS2, I have answered many times in my interviews. "After taking care of business in Alaska, where would Snake go?" When I asked myself this question, I very quickly reached the conclusion that he would be in a common location nearby instead of a remote corner of the world with a hostile climate. The candidate that I came up with no hesitation was New York. New York is the center of the world economy and culture - a melting pot and "mini Earth". It is in the United States of America, but not exactly American - more like an independent nation. That is why I chose New York. At the same time, it is an homage to the film. I said to myself, "If Snake escaped from New York in 1997, it was about time he returned to New York."

    John Carpenter was our hero in the 80s. He established the new genre of "Sci-fi horror." He did not "sell out" to blockbuster films. He pursued his own style of entertainment. He was never sucked into the current of the times. He ran the dark side. From the late 70s to the early 80s, he was a director completely different from Spielberg and Lucas. His popularity can be compared to that of James Cameron, who emerged later on (coincidentally, Cameron worked on the special effects of this movie). He has not created hits in the 90s, but he keeps on creating films constantly. Carpenter is Carpenter, and he will continue being Carpenter. No creator of our generation has been unaffected by Carpenter. I made sure to see every new film by him. This past summer, his film Ghosts of Mars has finally been shown in Japan. It was a B movie, but it revitalized me. It was the Carpenter film of all Carpenter films. His "rock spirit" was definitely there. Yes, it could be old-fashioned. It might not be a Hollywood mainstream movie. But still, I enjoyed it a lot. Like Escape from New York, it was indeed a Carpenter film. It was shown in a few selected theatres only, but die-hard fans like myself flocked to them and the film stayed in the theatres for a month. This was a sign of how popular and respected he is among men of my generation.

    In Japan, we released a Premium Package edition of MGS2. In the package was a pamphlet that included a comment from Carpenter himself. I have not met him in person, but he conscientiously played MGS2. I was really happy to hear that. He gave me his praising comment. The comment in the pamphlet is as follows: "Like Snake Plissken, MGS2 can't be stopped! This game rocks!" - John Carpenter
     
  21. Timstuff

    Timstuff Registered

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2004
    Messages:
    19,920
    Likes Received:
    1
    The picture of Solid Snake on the box for the original Metal Gear was actually traced over an image of Michael Beihn from The Terminator. It would have been awesome if in the 90's James Cameron made a Metal Gear movie with Michael Beihn as Snake. :D

    For current times though, I'd have to say Eric Bana. He looks like Snake and he could use a defining action hero role.
     
  22. Savage

    Savage Earth Rocker

    Joined:
    May 12, 2002
    Messages:
    22,213
    Likes Received:
    0
    Not to mention his gravelly voice.
     
  23. Timstuff

    Timstuff Registered

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2004
    Messages:
    19,920
    Likes Received:
    1
    Yeah, that too. :up:
     
  24. cyborg ninja 14

    cyborg ninja 14 God, I love your accent

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2003
    Messages:
    10,407
    Likes Received:
    0
    This thread has been done many times....but who cares!
     
  25. Riggs15382

    Riggs15382 Registered

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2005
    Messages:
    1,565
    Likes Received:
    0
    bale would suck
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice
monitoring_string = "afb8e5d7348ab9e99f73cba908f10802"