Heroes Strike Thread (Post all strike related news in here)

Discussion in 'Misc. TV Series' started by Gold Samurai, Nov 2, 2007.

  1. Katsuro Registered

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    lolz
     
  2. Darkdd Elle!

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    I think the executives will make sure that that doesn't happen. Nobody wants to lose another billion dollars.

    EDIT: The Writers Strike is now officially over.
     
  3. Darkdd Elle!

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    It's really done.

    After 100 days, WGA members vote overwhelmingly to go back to work.
    By Claudia Eller and Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times Staff Writers
    8:04 PM PST, February 12, 2008
    » Discuss Article
    The strike is over.

    Hollywood's costly 100-day walkout came to a widely welcomed end Tuesday after members of the Writers Guild of America voted overwhelmingly to go back to work.

    More than 90% of the 3,775 writers who cast ballots in Los Angeles and New York voted to end the work stoppage, capping the entertainment industry's most contentious labor dispute in recent history.

    RELATED

    PHOTOS: Stars shine on the WGA picket line
    More Related:
    The Strike Zone: The latest news, blogs & photos on the WGA strike
    "Rather than being shut out of the future of content creation and delivery, writers will lead the way as TV migrates to the Internet and platforms for new media are developed," said Patric M. Verrone, president of the WGA, West.

    On Feb. 25, writers are expected to ratify a new three-year contract that ensures them a stake in the revenue generated when their films, TV shows and other creative works are distributed on the Internet. Whether the benefits from the new contract will be enough to offset the income writers and others lost because of the strike is a matter of debate.

    Steven Beer, an entertainment attorney at Greenberg Traurig, Some predicted that working writers may have fewer opportunities as studios used the strike as a means to cut programming budgets, greenlight fewer pilots, reduce fees and limit the number of production deals on their lots.

    "Writers got hard-fought and well earned improvements but it could be tougher sledding for the rank and file in the future," he said.

    Other experts believe the writers won a victory that transcends any financial gains.

    "It was a defining moment," said economist Harley Shaiken, a professor at UC Berkeley who specializes in labor issues. "It showed that a very disparate group of individuals could act with real solidarity -- and that packed real economic power."

    The walkout, which began Nov. 5, proved to be far more economically damaging than the studios had expected, shutting down more than 60 TV shows, hampering ratings and depriving the networks of tens of millions in advertising dollars.

    Labor experts said the crippling effect of the strike helped writers achieve gains they might not have otherwise attained.

    The new contract gives them residual payments for shows streamed over the Internet and secures the union's jurisdiction for programming created for the Web.

    "They successfully faced down six multinational media conglomerates and established a beachhead on the Internet," said Jonathan Handel, former associate counsel for the Writers Guild of America, West and an attorney at TroyGould. "When you consider what they were initially offered and the enormous odds they faced, that's quite an achievement."

    Handel noted that studios had originally balked at writers' demands for new media residuals, proposing a multiyear study instead.

    Yet the new contract falls short of what writers were initially seeking.

    "It's a good deal, but not a great one," said Handel, adding that both sides made key compromises.

    For example, writers received guarantees that any guild member hired to create original shows for the Web would be covered under a union contract. But the tentative contract enables studios to hire nonunion writers to work on low-budget Internet shows, giving them the flexibility they sought to compete in the burgeoning world of Web entertainment.

    The writers agreement was largely patterned after a recent deal studios made with directors. Writers, however, got some important improvements, especially in pay for shows that are streamed on advertising-supported websites.

    Writers were unsuccessful, however, in their efforts to shorten the 17- to 24-day window that studios have to stream their shows for promotional purposes without paying residuals. Many writers complained that most viewers watch repeats online within days after the initial broadcast.

    Entertainment attorney Alan Wertheimer, who was hired by the guild in January to help break the logjam in its negotiations, had extracted a handshake agreement from studio chief executives for a "favored nations" provision related to new media, assuring writers that they would also receive any improvements actors may get in their upcoming contract negotiations.(Directors got a similar verbal promise.) The actors' contract expires June 31.

    But last Friday, when lawyers on both sides were hurriedly drafting the final writers contract, Wertheimer heard from WGA insiders that the studios forgot what they had verbally promised a week earlier. When confronted, the CEOs relented and agreed to honor it.

    With the strike now over, economists are tallying up the cost to the industry and the Los Angeles region. Measuring the financial losses is inherently difficult and estimates vary widely.

    Jack Kyser, chief economist for the Los Angeles Economic Development Corp., estimates the walkout cost the local economy more than $3 billion. Of that total, an estimated $772 million came from lost wages by writers and production workers, $981 million by various businesses that service the industry, including caterers to equipment rental houses, and $1.3 billion from the ripple effect of consumers not spending as much at retail shops, restaurants and car dealers.

    Still, the total is relatively small considering that the L.A. economy generates $1.3 billion a day.

    The entertainment industry employs about 250,000 in the Los Angeles region, including the thousands who are self-employed.

    http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/news/business/la-fi-strike13feb13,0,2886229.story
     
  4. DarkSuperman Registered

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    I Need More Heroes! I Cant Take All This Reality Tv Nonsense! Please Tim Kring Give Me Back My Fav Show! I Need It! Give Me Another Hit Please!
     
  5. Dark Sentinel Registered

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    Woohoo the strike is over!! Gimme my Heroes back now!! :hoboj:
     
  6. neemer5 Registered

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    Any news on whether they'll try to salvage the season with chapter 3? A lot of show look like they're gonna add shows for april/may.
     
  7. RonStoppablefan Harry Potter fan

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    Sounds like my fav shows Heroes and Chuck won't be back till Fall. With good reasons too, the producer wants to make sure every things perfect. I'm talking about the Heroes producer and I don't want them to make it like Volume 2 so this looks promising.

    FYI
    I am glad the strike is over, YES!!
     
  8. GL1 It's pronounced "glee"

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    Everything I've been reading on it indicates that Heroes will not pick up again this season. Hayden Panetierre, for instance, has been told she won't need to come back until April, when they usually start filming for fall, I believe. So... yeah...

    See ya in September.
     
  9. Sawyer High King

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    Villains better be ****ing spectacular if they expect me to wait this long. And, by that I mean...

    More of the Group of 12. For God sake, just tell us what powers Kaito, Angela and Arthur have.
    At least try to make Hiro more interesting and less annoying.
    Return Sylar to his former glory.
    Claire, I've had enough of your crap. You got your dad killed, get your stuff together.

    Oh, and I forgot....MORE HRG!!!
     
  10. Darkdd Elle!

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    Star Trek delayed. Will this affect Quinto's shooting schedule, and ulimately the Sylar story line?

    'Star Trek' pushed back to 2009
    Feb. 14, 2008, 2:03 PM EST
    Paramount shuffles major releases for this year due to the Writers' Strike
    By Pamela McClintock
    Variety

    LOS ANGELES -- Paramount is pushing back the release of J.J. Abrams' "Star Trek" from Dec. 25 to May 8, 2009, saying the picture's gross potential is greater as a summer tentpole.

    Move was part of a major reshuffling to the studio's release calendar, as well as to DreamWorks' release schedule. A second key change: DreamWorks' 2008 Ben Stiller summer comedy "Tropic Thunder" is moving from July 11 to Aug. 15.

    That's likely to mean that another film will take "Tropic's" old spot on July 11, particularly since there is such a dearth of broad comedies in the May-July stretch.

    Like Paramount, many of the major studios are likely to revisit their release schedules in the wake of the writers' strike as they try to balance out their 2008 and 2009 calendars.


    Video: Watch the "Star Trek" trailer
    "Star Trek" has no competition in its new slot -- at least not so far, although it opens one week after 20th Century Fox bows "X-Men Origins: Wolverine" and one week before Sony is slated to bow sequel "Angels and Demons."

    Paramount also dated two titles. Martin Scorsese's Leonardo DiCaprio-starrer "Shutter Island" will be released Oct. 2, 2009.

    An untitled comedy produced by Marlon and Shawn Wayans will be released on Feb. 9, 2009. Their brother Damon Wayans is directing from a script the three co-wrote with two other family members. Par is keeping the logline under wraps.

    Here are the other release changes to Paramount's schedule:

    Eddie Murphy family pic "Nowhereland" is moving from Sept. 26, 2008, to June 12, 2009.

    Renee Zellweger horror-thriller "Case 39" is moving from Aug. 22, 2008, to April 10, 2009.

    David Fincher's Brad Pitt starrer "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button" is moving from Nov. 26, 2008, to Dec. 19, 2008.

    In addition to the new date for "Tropic Thunder," DreamWorks and Par announced that Leonardo DiCaprio-Kate Winslet "Revolutionary Road" will be distributed by Paramount Vantage, and not the studio proper.

    http://movies.msn.com/movies/article.aspx?news=300983&Gt1=7701
     
  11. Katsuro Registered

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    Sounds like they're pushing it back for scheduling reasons, as in they think it'll make more money in the summer. Doesn't sound like a delay in the actual production, whihc means filming will probably still happen around the same time.
     
  12. Sawyer High King

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    NNNNNNNNNOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!

    02/27 - Kristen Bell is not signed on for next season. But sources confirm that Heroes is in active discussions with her to return for an arc during Season 3. Source: Ask Ausiello @ TV Guide

    I need weekly Kristen Bell, dammit. :down
     
  13. Darkdd Elle!

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    WHAT????? They have 7 months to fix that :o
     
  14. Sentinel X optical illusion

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    Kirsten Bell WILL be in season 3. Remember the season 3 promo that got leaked a while back where Sylar says
    "Im a psychopath, you should be scared."
    and she says "Im not scared of you...It takes on to know one."

    ...so yeah.
    Kirsten Bell was the BEST thing about Heroes season 2. I didn't like her charecter at first but she quickly became a really complex, witty, and interesting persona.
    I can't wait til season 3. I hope they hit the ground running, we've already been introduce to most of the charecters so its kind of annoying when the old "I don't know my powers" or "what exactly am I?" thing gets rehashed.
    I think charecters that got screwed up in season 2 but can be really awesome in season 3 are Sylar, Maya, and Nightmare Man...I hope the writers do a good job on them, esp Maya...she really needs it.
     

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