What's your latest read?

Discussion in 'DC Comics' started by sirmarkus, Aug 4, 2018.

  1. Babillygunn New Age Outlaw

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2014
    Messages:
    2,160
    Likes Received:
    1,506
    I absolutely loved the White Knight books. I really didn’t care for Metal, but Death Metal has been very enjoyable. I think you could probably just pick up with Death Metal #1. It might be a good idea to read heroes in crisis and Flash Forward beforehand just to get up to speed with what’s going on with Wally West. I didn’t read any of Snyder’s Justice League run, but I’m not feeling lost at all.
     
  2. Babillygunn New Age Outlaw

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2014
    Messages:
    2,160
    Likes Received:
    1,506
    Have you read Strange Apparitions? I bet you’d like it.
     
    Milk Tray Guy likes this.
  3. Neil McCauley Registered

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2020
    Messages:
    491
    Likes Received:
    402

    I’ll try reading that.

    Reading Bendis' dissembled and Death of Superman next time.
     
  4. Babillygunn New Age Outlaw

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2014
    Messages:
    2,160
    Likes Received:
    1,506
    Death of Superman is important and I like Jurgens, but it’s not a great comic imo. (The animated movie is great, however. But it’s screenplay was written by Peter Tomasi.)

    I’d recommend Strange Apparitions, Tower of Babel, Judas Contract, Birth of the Demon and Son of the Demon for great Batman stories with the tone of Death in the Family.

    I’d also recommend Birthright, All Star Superman, Up Up and Away, and Up
    In the Sky as great Superman stories.
     
  5. Bruce Wayne Let's get nuts!

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2014
    Messages:
    3,786
    Likes Received:
    3,919
    Been reading a lot of the old Jack Cole Plastic Man stories from the forties. I love it. Every side character is either a busty dame or a fast-talking gangster, and every location is either a smoky nightclub or an abandoned warehouse.

    The stories themselves are light, breezy and invariably uncomplicated. It's a very comedic spin on the typical sort of pulp crime fiction that was probably in vogue at the time. And Plastic Man is kind of worlds away from the wacky eccentric he would later become famous for being, instead serving the put upon straight-man to Woozy Winks' bumbling idiocy.

    I also find that Plastic Man's creative and unpredictable use of his powers, which has perhaps gotten just a little bit lost somewhere down the line of the character's history, somehow manages to tap into that highly coveted dopamine rush. :funny:
     
  6. Babillygunn New Age Outlaw

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2014
    Messages:
    2,160
    Likes Received:
    1,506
    I just read Mark Waid’s All Flash #1. I’d never read it before. I have to say, it was impeccably written, but Wally’s action at the end where he
    Slowed Inertia down to where he moves at an infinitely slow speed (it takes him a hundred years just to blink his eyes) but letting his consciousness remain at regular speed
    Is really diabolical. Actually to the point of being sick. Essentially
    Inertia is doomed to live for an eternity in a state of paralysis as a living statue on display at the Flash museum. That’s a horror show right there.
    . It’s especially wicked when you consider that Inertia is really just a kid.
     
  7. Milk Tray Guy 70s Man of Action

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2017
    Messages:
    13,542
    Likes Received:
    3,836
    Wow. :csad:
     
  8. Babillygunn New Age Outlaw

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2014
    Messages:
    2,160
    Likes Received:
    1,506
    I just finished Red Hood and the Outlaws #50. What a beautiful read. Scott Lobdell may have all kinds of skeletons and may be a horrible jerk, but that title was my favorite in the Rebirth era and I’m going to miss that team. And if it was going out, that was a tremendous story to go out on.
     
  9. Bruce Wayne Let's get nuts!

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2014
    Messages:
    3,786
    Likes Received:
    3,919
    Today, in preparation for a seemingly more righteous Riddler in The Batman, I read Matt Wagner's one-shot comic Batman: Riddler and the Riddle Factory. I was enjoying it well enough until those last few pages where it inexplicably made the Riddler into a low rent parody of Hans Gruber.

    They actually had Batman and the Riddler delivering dialogue that was lifted directly from Die Hard. Like, quoted almost verbatim. It sounds pretty sweet until you actually read it. I enjoyed it for the most part, but those last few pages really cheapened the whole experience for me.

    It actually had the effect of retroactively making the plot itself feel like a wholesale rip-off of Die Hard, what with the Riddler's pseudo-political terrorism actually being a front for his true goal of stealing a large fortune from under the police's noses. Overall I'm not sure how to feel about it. :funny:
     
    #259 Bruce Wayne, Nov 20, 2020
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2020
  10. Milk Tray Guy 70s Man of Action

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2017
    Messages:
    13,542
    Likes Received:
    3,836
    Finished Doomsday Clock Part 2, which collects issues 7 - 12 of the 12 issue miniseries.

    In my review of pt 1 I mentioned that I'd heard the original publication struggled with delays, and that I could see the story would benefit from being read straight through. So, I reread pt 1 before starting pt 2 (fortunately - I found I'd forgotten quite a bit!).

    There's still an undeniable kick in seeing characters from Watchmen interacting with those of the DCU. The connections with/callbacks to the original Watchmen are pretty cool, again helped by supplementary materials (probably my favourite parts of the whole thing). The story itself is entertaining enough. However...

    I wish Geoff Johns had written as Geoff Johns, not as Geoff Johns trying to be Alan Moore. It doesn't work. It sounds false. I'm not Johns' biggest fan, but he can normally string an impressive phrase or two together. Here, he's reaching for something he'll never grasp. It jarred enough in pt 1, but for some reason I found it a big distraction here. I've seen Doomsday Clock described as reading like fan-fiction. I get that.

    I've mentioned previously that the pacing in pt 1 is slow; here it's all over the place. It's like watching a movie that every now and then someone 'fast-forwards' for ten seconds.

    Were last-minute changes made to this? I get the feeling they intended going in one direction, then suddenly had to change course.

    Most annoyingly (possibly connected to my last point), the 'drop-off' in relation to certain characters. After pt 1 I was expecting the Comedian to play a major part... but he didn't. Joker, after the big build-up in pt 1? Disappeared pretty quickly. Mime and Marionette, featured so heavily in part 1? Didn't really do a lot. Okay, without spoiling, it's hinted that something involving them may play a part in things further down the line. But that's not the point; pt 1 built them up as major characters in this story; then pt 2 did next to nothing with them.

    Happily, Gary Frank's artwork is as great as in pt 1. Layouts, characters, backdrops, everything, just beautiful.

    Whilst pt 1 felt like a build-up to a main event, pt 2 didn't deliver the epic I was hoping for. I don't know how much impact Doomsday Clock had on the wider DCU. I'm a trade waiter, and with what we've had going on this year, I'm sure I'm further behind than usual.

    When I reviewed pt1 back in February I wrote, 'I've long thought that if there was a further story to be told - one that did the original [Watchmen] justice - I'd like to see it. So, is this that story?'

    The answer's no. Combining Watchmen with the DCU was a big step; being 'entertaining enough' doesn't cut it.


    7/10


    @Babillygunn As promised, my thoughts on second part of Doomsday Clock (sorry it took me so long).
     
    #260 Milk Tray Guy, Dec 21, 2020
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2020
    Babillygunn likes this.
  11. Babillygunn New Age Outlaw

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2014
    Messages:
    2,160
    Likes Received:
    1,506
    Great review, as always. I didn’t really like Doomsday Clock at all. And I couldn’t quite put my finger on why, but the above statement really resonates. I usually do like Johns. I like his stuff a lot. Infinite Crisis is my favorite crisis book. I love Forever Evil, Throne of Atlantis and Sinestro Corps War. I’ve indoctrinated my son to the point that he refers to Geoff Johns as “Midas” because it seems like everything he touches is gold. But Doomsday Clock was different. I wouldn’t even say that it felt like Johns doing an Alan Moore imitation. It felt like Geoff Johns imitating Zack Snyder imitating Alan Moore (with a dash of Tom King prose writing thrown in.)

    To me, the concept worked. I liked the Superman vs Dr Manhattan relationship. I also liked Marionette and Mime. In many ways Marionette is what Punchline should be. It really is the writing that lets everything down.
     
    Milk Tray Guy likes this.
  12. Milk Tray Guy 70s Man of Action

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2017
    Messages:
    13,542
    Likes Received:
    3,836
    Thanks.

    Yes, although I'm not generally a fan of Johns, I do agree that Infinite Crisis and Throne of Atlantis are excellent. It's interesting you mentioning Zack Snyder; although I like him, as I was writing that review a parallel did strike me between Johns trying to sound like Moore but lacking substance, and Snyder taking 'cool bits' from comics - but missing substance.

    And yes, Marionette and Mime are two characters that I think have lots of potential :up:
     
    Babillygunn likes this.
  13. Milk Tray Guy 70s Man of Action

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2017
    Messages:
    13,542
    Likes Received:
    3,836
    Just finished the trade Supergirl: Infectious, which collects Supergirl #34 - 42 and Supergirl Annual #2.

    Supergirl is a title I don't read a great deal of. I like Kara as a character, but a lot of her solo stuff doesn't really grab me, so most of my experience of her is from crossovers and team-ups. But, with getting hold of new stuff to read a bit of a challenge at the moment, I saw this and took a chance.

    Supergirl: Infectious ties in directly with the aftermath of Dark Nights: Metal, with several of Earth's heroes (Hawkman, Shazam, Blue Beetle, Donna Troy, even Jim Gordon!) having been infected through a virus by the Batman Who Laughs, and transformed into Dark versions of themselves. When Supergirl stumbles across Superman and Batman fighting the fallen heroes, her brave attempt to prevent Superman from becoming infected ends with her being infected herself.

    What follows from then on is pretty much a repeat cycle:
    • Supergirl revels in her 'liberation'
    • Supergirl does (or tries to do) pretty bad things, whilst convincing herself that they're actually pretty good things
    • Supergirl gets accused of being a monster, but doesn't see it
    • Supergirl has memories of happier/more innocent times
    In amongst this, she has a short battle with Superman, a longer battle with Wonder Woman, and a few tête-à-têtes with the Batman Who Laughs (who may or may not be really there) - none of which seem to actually accomplish anything or move the plot forward in any way. We go from scene to scene, but the overall story feels like it's 'marking time', marching on the spot. The general premise of 'Supergirl gone bad' isn't exactly new, and this doesn't do anything new with it. On top of that, more than once as one chapter finishes with an obvious build-up to something big, the next chapter starts having completely bypassed whatever that 'something big' was! I get that these events are tied into other comics (Event Leviathan and Year of the Villain, apparently) which I haven't had a chance to read yet, but that doesn't make it any less frustrating (it wouldn't be quite so bad if there was at something on the cover at least to indicate that, but there's nothing).

    The writing is by Jody Houser, Marc Andreyko, and Robert Vendetti, none of whom really stand out above the others (which really surprises me with Vendetti; the last thing of his I read was Hawkman: Awakening, which he did a fantastic job on). Art is by Eduardo Pansica (pretty good), Rachel Stott (okay), Inaki Miranda (meh), and Laura Braga (poor).

    The affection I have for Kara as a character doesn't rescue this.

    5.5/10
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice
monitoring_string = "afb8e5d7348ab9e99f73cba908f10802"