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"Let Your Soul-Glo": The Experience Returns

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Haha, effeminate black dudes always have the most outlandish opinions, and don't mind sharing them.

I don't think I'm too effeminate or outlandishly opinionated...I hope not.:ninja:
 
Haha, most of you have seen pictures of me before, and a black dude that is light skinned with freckles, the comment I get the most is, "you must be mixed" or "are you part white/mexican/native american", etc. Both of my parents are black, but my grandmother is the one that had the white father. But they would say it like, "you're so lucky to look like that and not like the rest of them." :dry:

I love the racial ambiguity. It's that icing on the cake called life that only so many of us get to experience.

Terry, did you slap the person that said that to you?
 
Don't let people fool you into thinking other countries don't have problems with racism either. The UK, France, Japan, and countless other countries deal with these things yet some act as if it's ONLY some big issue in America.
Since when did anyone say racism is only an American thing :huh:

We watched Vincent Cassel movie Le Haine in french class in school. Its three friends from the Parisian projects.

There is also The Class which is like a french Dangerous Minds.
Every now and then, I'll watch a Bollywood movie if it's subtitled or in English. A vast majority of the actors I see in their movies have light skin. The beauty queens who come out of India typically have light skin, too. I put 2+2 together and realized there must be a skin tone bias in that country. Then one day I saw a commercial online for an Indian skin-lightening that portrayed a beautiful olive-skinned woman being scorned by love until she used the cream and went up a few shades. I have a few friends who grew up in the Philippines, and I've heard about some skin color bias there as well. It's sad, really.

I think black people in the US are the only people I've ever heard of who encourage people with darker skin tones to be proud of their looks. And even that's not consistent. We'll complain about Beyonce's skin being too light after magazine cover touch-ups, then turn around and crack a joke about Wesley Snipes being blacker than midnight.

India has had a caste system for centuries surpriesed you only just knew about it :huh:

The skin tone preference is actully worst than in the black community. Been plenty of documentaries about it here on british television due to our large asian population.

Dark skinned women are considered ugly by some parts of the Indian community and are not considered marriage material.
You see Bollywood stars selling skin whitening treatment in indian.
 
I've always hated getting those "You're not like most black people" compliments. It almost always comes from people who don't think they're racist, and they never catch just how stupid that sounds. Do they really think all black people are the stereotypes they see on TV?

Personally, I blame BET. :o
Yep we are one homogeneous hive mined entity :whatever:

Its like when people try to justify the use of the N-word by saying black people use it all the time. No they don't some African Americans use it which is not the majority of black people on the planet. Go to Africa, Europe, South America, the Caribbean or anywhere else with a large population of black folks they are not using the N-word every ten seconds.
Haha, most of you have seen pictures of me before, and a black dude that is light skinned with freckles, the comment I get the most is, "you must be mixed" or "are you part white/mexican/native american", etc. Both of my parents are black, but my grandmother is the one that had the white father. But they would say it like, "you're so lucky to look like that and not like the rest of them." :dry:
I watch BBC genealogy show 'who do you think you are?' and one thing I learned is skin color doesn't mean your not racially mixed somewhere down the line.

You can be as black night and have an ancestor of a different race. British actor Rupert Penny Jones had a Indian ancestor due to his families long service in the military in India.

Most African Americans, Black South Americans and caribbeans with some race or another that isn't black but it has nothing to do with skintone.
 
I take for granted that people figure out I'm black when they look at me. On the rare occasion that someone asks me my full-on background, I have a list...

1. Well, obviously I have ancestors from Africa. However, the people running the Transatlantic Slave Trade didn't keep exact records, so I couldn't tell you where exactly my ancestors came from, or whether their cultures still exist.
2. My last name is an English name, implying that my ancestors either mixed with English-descended white people way down the line or some freed slaves just took their former masters' surname.
3. I'm partially Creole, which is the name for the French settlers who colonized the Louisiana Territory before selling it to the US.
4. No, that's not the Cajuns. The Cajuns are the French Canadians who got kicked out of Canada and moved south into Louisiana. Please don't call me Cajun.
5. I know I'm part Cherokee, but the fraction is so tiny that I officially don't count as Cherokee.
 
I take for granted that people figure out I'm black when they look at me. On the rare occasion that someone asks me my full-on background, I have a list...

1. Well, obviously I have ancestors from Africa. However, the people running the Transatlantic Slave Trade didn't keep exact records, so I couldn't tell you where exactly my ancestors came from, or whether their cultures still exist.
2. My last name is an English name, implying that my ancestors either mixed with English-descended white people way down the line or some freed slaves just took their former masters' surname.
3. I'm partially Creole, which is the name for the French settlers who colonized the Louisiana Territory before selling it to the US.
4. No, that's not the Cajuns. The Cajuns are the French Canadians who got kicked out of Canada and moved south into Louisiana. Please don't call me Cajun.
5. I know I'm part Cherokee, but the fraction is so tiny that I officially don't count as Cherokee.

Love every bit of this!! My grandmother traced our family back to Jamaica. I also have a lot of white ancestry and very little Native American. One trait my family has though is not so kinky hair. I get asked almost everyday if I have a curl.:cmad:
 
Something I learned watching actor Hugh Quarshire (aka Captain Panaka in Star Wars Phantom Menace/Highlander/Doctor Who/Night Breed) on Who do You Think You Are?
was that Ghana in western africa had a traded with Europe since the Portugese came in the 15th century and their was a whole village of African men decended from the same Dutchmen who married a ghanian women. If you saw them you would not tell they had european ancestory at all.
 
I was thinking America was bad with racism until I went back to Brazil. Preto and Pardo people are treated poorly and it is very very common. Recently a boy was hit by a bike but the man who hit him would not help because he said the boy probably stole the bike. When the boy was then taken to the hospital the doctors refused to help him and said "he obviously cannot pay his bills because he is dark skin." The boy died because of this. It is so so sad. At least nothing like this would be passable in America. I mainly live in the south in America and while there are some bad people there, it's much more progressive. And then I will then be in a parish near St Michael's for Christmas.:csad:

Well damn I was not expecting the story to be this bad :wow:
 
Thanks, looked a few of them each up.

Lyndon Barrois- CG animation director of Speed Racer, Sucker Punch, Happy Feet, Night at the Museum and Matrix sequels
Jamaal Bradley- animator on Monster House, Surf's Up, and Tangled
Frank C. Braxton, Jr- Probably the most important, listed as one of the first african american animators. Director of Rocky & Bullwinkle, George of the Jungle animated show, Mr. Magoo, and several Charlie Brown cartoons
Lennie Graves- Animation supervisor of The Clone Wars, also animator on Beauty and the Beast and Iron Giant
 
Thanks, looked a few of them each up.

Lyndon Barrois- CG animation director of Speed Racer, Sucker Punch, Happy Feet, Night at the Museum and Matrix sequels
Jamaal Bradley- animator on Monster House, Surf's Up, and Tangled
Frank C. Braxton, Jr- Probably the most important, listed as one of the first african american animators. Director of Rocky & Bullwinkle, George of the Jungle animated show, Mr. Magoo, and several Charlie Brown cartoons
Lennie Graves- Animation supervisor of The Clone Wars, also animator on Beauty and the Beast and Iron Giant

Wow I had no idea they had african american animators in those days, these are some pretty big properties too.
 
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