The Official Batman Returns Thread - Part 4

Discussion in 'Batman World' started by Thread Manager, Jan 15, 2015.

  1. Rorschach2012

    Rorschach2012 I'll Cancel the Pizzas

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    i got this tattooed on my arm the other day :D

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Kane52630

    Kane52630 Astral Plane User

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  3. Spider-Aziz

    Spider-Aziz Not the Voice You Know

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    I'm watching this again, and it's at the 36 minutes mark that we see Bruce Wayne a second time, and he stays for a little more than a minute. I don't know how many times I pointed this out before, but I know mentioning it now.


    I froze that last frame with Penguin here.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. Hunter Rider

    Hunter Rider Ronin

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  5. Nardz937

    Nardz937 In The Chill Of Night

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  6. antsman41

    antsman41 Belongs To Prince

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    Still so hot.
     
  7. Elayis

    Elayis Registered

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    Just watched this again for the first time in years and I was shocked by how little screen-time Batman had in this. He has maybe two appearances in the first 40 minutes, and brief ones at that. What little he has to do in the film is spent either reacting to Penguin & Catwoman's mayhem or lusting after Selina like a clueless high schooler.

    The cynical tone became more wearisome as the film went on to the point where it became a struggle to finish it. The entire look of the film is gorgeous, as is Elfman's score and the Siouxsie and the Banshee's song, but there's no one onscreen to root for. Everyone is either a buffoon, maniacally evil or both. I also can't shake the feeling that Burton doesn't care about Batman or his universe, and only used it superficially to craft his own original tale. If you take away the names and iconography, does it bear any resemblance to who these characters should be? Someone who murders so gleefully is in no way how a person who calls himself Batman should act.
     
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  8. theMan-Bat

    theMan-Bat Team Classic DC

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    They didn't want to spoil the mysterious persona. In Starlog #180 (1992) Tim Burton explained, "By his nature, he [Batman] wants to remain in the shadows. He's a tough character because he's so internalized. I got ragged on for the first movie because Jack [Nicholson] was so out there and Michael [Keaton] was so laidback, but I didn't see any other way of doing it and keeping true to the character."

    In Fantazone #26 (1992) Daniel Waters explained, "He [Michael Keaton] would go through my scenes and say, 'We don't need all this. All Batman has to say is one line..' He's [Batman's] intentionally clipped and keeps to himself."
    Batman- The 1989 Film: Vintage Magazine Article: "Fantazone" Issue #26 Summer 1992

    In Prevue [August 1992] Daniel Waters explained, "Even though Batman became less verbally dramatic in the final script, Tim [Burton] has an excellent feel for filmmaking beyond the script - that is, how these actors can communicate without using words."
    Batman- The 1989 Film: Vintage Magazine Article: "Prevue" August 1992

    What he has to do in the film is either fighting the Red Triangle Circus Gang, solving the mystery of The Penguin, fighting against Oswald's run for mayor, and getting framed for the abduction and murder of the Ice Princess, going up against Max Shreck and his schemes with the power plant and trying to replace the mayor, and repairing the Batmobile, and stopping the penguin army, going to a masquerade ball, and fighting Catwoman and also courting and trying to open up to Selina Kyle like a lonely man finding a rare connection with a kindred spirit in a dysfunctional relationship. Michael Keaton explained in Comic Scene #29 (1992) that his favorite Bruce Wayne scene centered on his encounter on a Gotham City street with Selina Kyle, "It's the scene where I see her talking to herself, which is something I've always found attractive in a woman. Selina's nuts, Vicki's not. Selina's got a head thing going and is a lot like Bruce. Vicki's not like that. She seems to be working more out of her gut. Vicki is probably the easiest of the two to be around. Being around Selina takes a lot of work. I'm consistently filling out forms for state hospitals. I had some moments of thinking, 'Boy, this is going to get strange,' or, 'The press is going to have a field day with this,' but there's a lot of mutual respect involved between us. We know enough about each other personally that it helped us, but our knowledge wasn't enough to get in the way."
    Batman- The 1989 Film: Vintage Magazine Article: "Comics Scene" #29

    In the Comics Scene Yearbook (1992) Tim Burton explained, "Character-wise, we're not trying to up the ante with Batman in this film. we're not trying to make him too cynical or too dark. We didn't want to make him too dangerous. He's just this character dealing with other characters, so he's pretty close to where he was in the first film. Superman is and always has been a good vs. evil thing. Batman has never been that cut-and-dried. With Batman, you get a lot of grey areas, and that was a major consideration in developing the script to Batman Returns. Batman is consistently on the edge. On the one side, he's very human, weaknesses and all, which is appealing."

    Tim Burton explained, "Even Batman [(1989)]; that did great at the box office but it was not well critiqued. 'Batman's too dark.' I mean Batman made a lot of money but critically, it was panned and considered too dark."
    Tim Burton on ‘Big Eyes,’ Beetlejuice and Batman – Rolling Stone

    In Tim Burton's book Burton on Burton he explained, "There was a big backlash that it was 'too dark,' but I found this movie [Batman Returns] much less dark than the first one. It's just the culture climate. And they [Warners] hear that. They listen to that. I don't want to because I think it's dangerous and perverse. I think the culture is much more disturbed and disturbing than this movie, a lot more. But they just fixate on things and they choose targets. Got a lot of flake from parents thinking it [Batman Returns] was too scary for their kids. But I feel close to that material. I certainly don't feel like dissociating myself from the material completely because I feel I gave it something."

    In Comics Scene #29 (1992) Michael Keaton explained, "The intention on my part was to lighten Bruce and Batman up a bit, and the script presented me with the opportunity to not sulk so much. We pretty much laid down the brooding, morose thing in the first film; to have dwelled on that in this film would have been boring. We have that first shot of Bruce in this movie's beginning, where we get that whole thing out in the open and out of the way. It was important to establish that. But after that, we felt we were free to move the character up into other shades and emotions."
    Batman- The 1989 Film: Vintage Magazine Article: "Comics Scene" #29

    Tim Burton explained, "Feelings that I look for in films, in a sense of a mixture of the light and the dark, the funny and the tragic and that scary dysfunctional relationship.... It doesn't really fit into any category. It's got a mixture of everything, which is what I liked about it. You're dealing with a smaller crew, you don't have to worry about McDonald's tie-ins or hear the word 'franchise.'"
    Tim Burton on ‘Big Eyes,’ Beetlejuice and Batman – Rolling Stone

    Siouxsie explained, "The best thing about it was we did a really great song. We did our own really great music video, and we got to meet Tim Burton - who I really admire. And then, as soon as we'd finished it, there began the worst nightmare I've ever had. Basically it was Warners who put it out, and they procrastinated about when they were gonna release it for months. Warners did release it, but in such a way that its probably the world's best kept secret. Warners are such scumbags."

    There's Batman to root for, there's Penguin to sympathize with, and Catwoman is both someone you can root for and sympathize with.

    In Time [June 22 1992] Daniel Waters explained about Michelle Pfeiffer's Catwoman, "We wanted her tied deep into female psychology. Female rage is interesting; we made her a mythic woman you can sympathize with. Catwoman isn't a villain, and she isn't Wonder Woman fighting for the greater good of society. But she does have her own agenda. She's nobody's toy. She's a wild card - the movie's independent variable. In the daylight they [Michael Keaton's Bruce Wayne and Michelle Pfeiffer's Selina Kyle] have a sweet, tentative romance, but at night their ids are out, beating the heck out of each other. In costume their ids are active. No kissing there, only one good lick."
    Batman- The 1989 Film: Vintage Magazine Article: "Time" June 22, 1992

    In Prevue [August 1992] Danny DeVito explained, "The Penguin's really two people. In one sense, he's a super-intelligent guy who just wants to be accepted. On the other hand, he's enraged because people find him so revolting they turn away in horror. He could have been well educated like his parents and become a leader, but instead he's been exposed to a bunch of dishonorable characters. It's kind of a tragedy, but we're all the result of our treatment by other people."
    Batman- The 1989 Film: Vintage Magazine Article: "Prevue" August 1992

    In Movieline [July 1992] Danny DeVito explained, "Burton saw Penguin as a character that had been dealt a hand, a certain set of circumstances he was forced to live with all his life, and because of these events, he's been pushed into the darker regions. But his intelligent and his will to live in another realm kind of clash - his circumstances are dark, serious and heartfelt in the underground, but he desires the above world. So I thought that was a really great take on Penguin."
    Batman- The 1989 Film: Vintage Magazine Article: "Movieline" July 1992

    In Starlog #183 (1992) Danny DeVito explained, "His mother and father hated him and threw him out like a piece of garbage. The Penguin is quite an intelligent man, and someone who, from birth, if Oswald's parents had taken the time to accept him as a human being despite his deformities, he might have grown up to be [an] Albert Einstein. But because he was thrown away, and because of who and where he was raised, he became something totally different, totally evil. There are some moments in the film where you can see the insecurities and conflicts that are pulling at him. In a sense, we see him as vulnerable. One of the most telling lines in the entire film is when the Penguin attempts to assimilate into the real world, but he's rejected and turned back to his lair. He yells out, 'I am not a human being! I am an animal!' That line said it all, as far as I was concerned."
    Batman- The 1989 Film: Vintage Magazine Article: "Starlog" October 1992

    In Prevue [August 1992] Tim Burton explained, "I particularly like the characters in this film because they're symbolic of what's going on in the world today. They aren't simply good or bad."
    Batman- The 1989 Film: Vintage Magazine Article: "Prevue" August 1992
    In Starlog #181 (1992) Michael Murphy explained, "The picture is a metaphor for many big cities. Some of them are barely governable these days. The Mayor of Gotham tries to keep a lid on things, tries to keep the city functioning, but it's a very difficult job and he's having a tough time of it. I have a skirmish of sorts with the Christopher Walken character, Max Shreck. He owns a big department store, he's famous and he's a publicity hound - sort of a Donald Trump-type entrepreneur. He wants to build a power plant in Gotham, and I don't want him to build one, Gotham doesn't need one. But he's a devious guy, and through a long series of events, the Penguin ends up running against me. They try to recall me, and when they do, Max Shreck backs the Penguin. She [Selina Kyle] becomes this Catwoman after a series of nasty things happen to her, chauvinistic things. She works for Max. She's his secretary. At the beginning she pipes up at this meeting. Our male bastion of power turns on her like she's an idiot, like, 'How dare you speak!'"
    Batman- The 1989 Film: Vintage Magazine Article: Starlog Magazine Issue #181 August 1992
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/nati...0203b8d7b44_story.html?utm_term=.c34de0adad41
    In Starlog #183 (1992) Christopher Walken explained, "Max is a tycoon, a big real estate guy. He wears spats and is involved in a lot of shady business. I've heard the comparison to Donald Trump before... we're both from Queens [New York]."
    Batman- The 1989 Film: Vintage Magazine Article: "Starlog" October 1992
    Christopher Walken explained, "Other people say that I speak like him [Donald Trump]. Well, we both come from Queens. It's true in most movies I don't use my own voice. I'm always from somewhere. Gotham City is really New York. I was born there. So I used my own voice. That's it."
    AT LUNCH WITH: Christopher Walken; A New York Actor Takes Stardom With a Grain of Salt
    In Scarlet Street #7 (1992) Daniel Waters explained about the Max Shreck name, "Max Schreck [in Nosferatu] played a character who sucked blood from the population...and [Christopher Walken's] Max Shreck is something of a vampire, sucking up energy, power, and money from Gotham City."
    Batman- The 1989 Film: Vintage Magazine Article: Scarlet Street Issue #7 Summer 1992
    Michael Keaton's Bruce Wayne and Pat Hingle's Burtonverse Commissioner Gordon were revealed to be members of the Gotham City Democrats Club in the Batman (1989) script and novel.

    In Prevue [August 1992] Tim Burton explained, "There's something about Batman that makes you want to be him. I don't mean to say that I'm the Batman, but I definitely can relate to the guy. I feel for him. That's why audiences have not - and never will - tire of the Batman."
    Batman- The 1989 Film: Vintage Magazine Article: "Prevue" August 1992

    In Starlog #180 (1992) Tim Burton explained, "I don't know if I would go so far as to say that Batman is my alter-ego, but I certainly do respond to his obsessions in wanting things done a certain way. He's a weird guy who does strange things. I wonder what that makes me?"

    And Tim Burton confirmed, "Obviously my favorite comic book character was Batman."

    In Rolling Stone [July 1992] Tim Burton explained, "The only thing that keeps me going through a movie is that these characters mean something to me. My process is such that I look at all these characters and get a feeling out of them that I find very meaningful. And thematic. That’s the only way for me to approach it."
    Tim Burton | Inner Views | David Breskin

    Should be what? Should Michelle Pfeiffer's Catwoman be a hooker and Danny DeVito's Penguin be the Iceberg Lounging, weapon smuggling Penguin [that wasn't even in the comics until 1995] from the comics? Those were comic book reboots. The so-called "traditional Iceberg Lounging, weapon smuggling version" is a Post-Crisis/Post-Zero Hour reboot from Detective Comics #683 (1995) "Odds Against" written by Chuck Dixon and art by Graham Nolan. The Penguin made into a John Romita/Stan Lee 1967 Kingpin rip-off. Bruce Timm made the Kingpin of Gotham-Penguin reboot more popular when he adapted that Penguin to The New Batman Adventures animated series in 1998 episodes on TV and DC made the Kingpin-Penguin reboot more popular when they adapted that Penguin to the Arkham City, etc. video games from 2011, it's still not the Golden Age Penguin by Bill Finger and Kane and Jerry Robinson/Dick Sprang, the grotesque bird-man of a thousand umbrellas, that's the true original Penguin Denny DeVito brought to life in the Burtonverse.

    Burgess Meredith's "wak waak waaak" Pengy and Julie Newmar/Lee Meriwether/Eartha Kitt's purring and hissing Catwoman in the Dozierverse are a comedy satire of the Silver Age comics Penguin by Julius Schwartz and Carmine Infantino. A Penguin that never killed anybody, was colorful, and was noticeably taller and thinner than the Golden Age Penguin was drawn by Bob Kane and Jerry Robinson and Dick Sprang. Burgess Meredith's Pengy was somewhat more flamboyant and wore a purple hat and purple tie. Julie Newmar's Catwoman design was very loosely based on the classic '54 Catwoman comic book art from Dick Sprang, but about the only thing that was kept in the costume was the little boots.

    Michelle Pfeiffer's Catwoman design was obviously must have been based on the classic '91 Catwoman comic book art from Norm Breyfogle, which was the then current look of Catwoman at the time Batman Returns was in preproduction.
    Danny DeVito's Penguin was based on the classic '40s Penguin comic book art from Dick Sprang that was a killer with deadly umbrellas. Although Bob Kane, Jerry Robinson and Dick Sprang's Penguin art was very cartoony and literally looked like an obese dwarf with a deformed beak nose and penguin-like body shape, Danny DeVito's Penguin particularly resembled the Bob Kane, Jerry Robinson and Dick Sprang Penguin art from the comic books brought to life, with the very short height [Danny DeVito is 4 foot 11 inches and three quarters tall, specifically, [about 5 foot tall - practically a dwarf] and overweight], Danny DeVito's Penguin has the beak nose, the black top hat, stripped pants, flame thrower umbrella, etc. just put into Danny DeVito's real anatomical proportions [which are enhanced to a more penguin-like body shape proportions with a fat suit] with additions to his wardrobe including with an added vest, ascot and trench coat, and expanding on the penguin motif with webbed penguin-like "flipper hands" - which is a real human deformity called syndactyly, making Penguin more of a complete character like a person that could exist and less of a cartoon caricature of a real person.

    In the book Batman Returns: The Official Movie Book (1992) by Michael Singer, Tim Burton explained, "I feel like a real kindred spirit with Danny [DeVito], and I think we're really creating something that people will see and enjoy as a natural expansion of the comic book character."
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    A lot of people didn't get the clues that the Red Triangle Circus are who raised the Danny DeVito Penguin, and was named "Jimmy" by the Red Triangle Circus, because, since he was abandoned by his parents when he was a baby, he didn't know his real name is Oswald Cobblepot. And he was billed/presented as "the Hideous Penguin Boy, the Bizarre Aquatic Bird Boy" in the Red Triangle Circus freak show. Also included is the old Gotham Globe newspaper report that Bruce Wayne was reading about missing children on the Red Triangle Circus fairgrounds and the police were searching for the Penguin, described as "a young man billed as 'the Bizarre Aquatic Bird Boy' who was last seen in the company of at least one missing child, according to sources." In the comics Bill Finger's original Penguin was without an origin, Michael Fleisher's origin for the "Pre-Crisis" Earth-1 Penguin was getting bullied at school for his mom making him always carry an umbrella [from The Best of DC Blue Ribbon Digest: Secret Origins of Super-Villains (1981) "The Origin of the Penguin" written by Michael Fleisher and art by Romeo Tanghal] and the "Post-Crisis" Penguin's origin was basically the same Michael Fleisher story [in Secret Origins Special #1 (1989) "The Killing Peck" written by Alan Grant and art by Sam Kieth]. Tim Burton found the psychological underpinnings of that origin to be very weak. Tim Burton and Daniel Waters made Penguin's roots far more larger, dark, tragic and epic. "Jimmy The Penguin Boy" (1991) from The Art of Tim Burton (2009) book.
    [​IMG]

    Danny DeVito explained, "With Batman, I remember the first meeting we had was so great. He had a painting of circus stripes, red and white, just beautiful, just a big canvas. And this creature, and there was a caption that said, ‘My name is Jimmy, but they call me The Hideous Penguin Boy.’ It was so moving."
    Danny DeVito on Tim Burton’s Dumbo: “I believe this is the completion of the Circus Trilogy”

    In Batman Returns Michael Gough's Burtonverse Alfred calls Danny DeVito's Penguin a "ghastly grotesque." The '40s comics described the Penguin as a "grotesque creature" - Batman #36 (1946) "The Penguin's Nest" for example [Reprinted in Batman: The Dark Knight Archives vol. 8]:
    [​IMG]
    And a "grotesque bird" - Batman #25 (1944) "Knights of Knavery" for example [reprinted in The Greatest Batman Stories Ever Told (1988)]:
    [​IMG]

    Michelle Pfeiffer's Catwoman is intentionally not the prostitute of the then current "Post-Crisis" Frank Miller Batman: Year One comics reboot. In Fantazone #26 (1992) writer Daniel Waters also explained, "My interest stems from the fact that they told me were going to be doing the Catwoman character and she was not going to be the Julie Newmar prototype of the [Adam West Batman] TV series or the hooker of the comic books. She starts off as this sort of harassed secretary. When she becomes Catwoman it's not the kind of Catwoman we're used to seeing. It's not like she's curled up on a couch in a penthouse. There's a lot wider degrees of emotions that she goes through. It's an incredible performance."
    Batman- The 1989 Film: Vintage Magazine Article: "Fantazone" Issue #26 Summer 1992

    Michelle Pfeiffer's Catwoman origin in Batman Returns actually harks back to the original Catwoman origin from Batman #62 (1950) "The Secret Life of the Catwoman" written by Bill Finger, art by Bob Kane and Lew Schwartz [reprinted in The Greatest Batman Stories Ever Told #2 (1992)], in which Selina Kyle was an introvert, then survived a crash, but suffered from amnesia. Thereafter she became Catwoman by releasing her formerly repressed inner-self, and all her inhibitions.

    In Prevue magazine [August 1992] Daniel Waters explained, "It's possible our Catwoman won't be cute enough for some people and may ruin a lot of bathroom fantasies, but the character was built for reasons other than to be a heavy metal fetish figure. I wanted her to be every bit as commanding as Batman, which Tim [Burton] liked."
    Batman- The 1989 Film: Vintage Magazine Article: "Prevue" August 1992

    Michelle Pfeiffer's Selina Kyle in Batman Returns has been misunderstood by a lot of people because the "nine lives" talk isn't so obvious and isn't explained in the film that it's metaphorical and not literal. It's a mysterious caper film. It is mysterious so a lot of people jump to assumptions without thinking any deeper. It's a Batman movie that is not a popcorn movie. Things are not what they seem to be at first. Michelle Pfeiffer's Selina Kyle Catwoman doesn't literally have "nine lives" cat powers and never actually died. Like Michael Keaton's Bruce Wayne mysteriously uses peoples superstitious fears about bats to strike terror as Batman, Michelle Pfeiffer's Selina Kyle uses the superstitions about cats as metaphors as Catwoman. Michelle Pfeiffer's Catwoman [and cats in general] does not literally have "nine lives" cat powers. Batman Returns script writer Daniel Waters explained, "To me, the whole nine lives thing was just a piece of dialogue and vague artistic license. It was never something I considered literally."
    'Batman Returns' at 25: Stars Reveal Script Cuts, Freezing Sets and Aggressive Penguins
    In Batman #35 (1946) "Nine Lives Has the Cat" written by Bill Finger, art by Bob Kane and Ray Burnley [reprinted in Batman: The Dark Knight Archives vol. 8 (2013)] Catwoman claims she has "nine lives," which she doesn't literately. That story is also the first time Catwoman wears the Catwoman face mask instead of a cat's head and she has blonde hair.

    Michael Keaton's Batman kills in self defense and in defense of the whole city, but doesn't murder. He commits justifiable homicide. There is a difference. Bill Finger and Bob Kane's Batman killed and that only changed due to editorial censorship beginning in the '40s with DC's Editorial Advisory Board and '50s Comics Code Authority. Bill Finger and Bob Kane didn't see anything wrong with Batman using guns and killing bad guys because The Shadow using guns and killed, and Zorro killed, too, and those are the main characters they based Batman on in the first place. Michael Keaton's Batman was killing with an terror striking attitude and presence. He had to get rid of the bomb somehow before it went off and the Tattooed Strongman criminal assailant wasn't letting Batman past him [Batman's punch barely fazed him], and he was likely intent on either killing or causing serious bodily injury to Batman, and also to innocent victims.

    Michael Keaton explained in Comics Scene #29 (1992), "I liked the first Batman scene we filmed [for Batman Returns], where Batman pops the bad guy [the Tattooed Strongman (world champion arm-wrestler Rick Zumwalt) of the Red Triangle Circus Gang], spins him around and does the thing with the bomb. Then, I turn and face the Penguin. It was a tough scene to choreograph because there was so much going on. But what I worked really hard on in that scene was presenting Batman as somebody with a real attitude and presence."
    Batman- The 1989 Film: Vintage Magazine Article: "Comics Scene" #29

    Michael Keaton's Batman Returns scriptwriter Daniel Waters: "My friends always asked, 'How can you have Batman kill somebody?' To me, Batman not killing Heath Ledger at the end of The Dark Knight after proving he can get out of any prison, it's like 'Come on. Kill Heath Ledger.'"
     
    #683 theMan-Bat, Mar 25, 2019
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2019
  9. OutOfBoose

    OutOfBoose Russian Hacker

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    Batman Returns 4K remaster screening is today.
     
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  10. Gothamsknight

    Gothamsknight Registered

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    Really wanted to see this on the big screen but it looks like I won't be able to. :(
     
  11. OutOfBoose

    OutOfBoose Russian Hacker

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    It's not being screened in Russia at all. So I'll have to wait a few weeks more for the UHD release. But seeing it in a theater is different experience.
     
  12. Milk Tray Guy

    Milk Tray Guy 70s Man of Action

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    My second favourite Batman film after TDK (and it's a damned close second!) :up:
     
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  13. Ninjablade

    Ninjablade Not as bad as it looks

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    Seeing this in a little bit on the big screen. Honestly so excited. This is hands down my favorite Batman film.
     
  14. Ninjablade

    Ninjablade Not as bad as it looks

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    Wasn't disappointed in the slightest, this was magnificent to see on the big screen. I saw Batman '89, and while the remastering was really good for that one, I feel it was far batter with Returns. The picture was so damn clean without losing the grain or old school feeling of the movie. Returns' cinematography was already really good, but I felt it was only highlighted even more. My only issue is they increased the warmth of the film, which was noticeable in a few scenes (like during the opening titles the letters have an orangish hue). But it didn't distract from my overall experience.

    Very happy I got the chance to catch this. I'll definitely be picking up the remasters when they come out.
     
  15. OutOfBoose

    OutOfBoose Russian Hacker

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  16. Kane52630

    Kane52630 Astral Plane User

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  17. OutOfBoose

    OutOfBoose Russian Hacker

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    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Stunning remaster.
     
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  18. Ninjablade

    Ninjablade Not as bad as it looks

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    Gorgeous.
     
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  19. Kane52630

    Kane52630 Astral Plane User

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  20. -JKR-

    -JKR- Registered

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    I L O V E this movie. I LOVE Tim Burton's Batman. I LOVE Michael Keaton's Batman.
     
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  21. Milk Tray Guy

    Milk Tray Guy 70s Man of Action

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    BR is my second favourite (and it's a very close second) Batman movie after The Dark Knight :up:
     
  22. -JKR-

    -JKR- Registered

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    Yup, it's probably the same for me. "The Dark Knight," followed (very closely) by "Batman Returns" and "Batman." And then "Batman Begins" and "The Dark Knight Returns." And "Batman V Superman (Ultimate Edition)". "Batman Forever." "Batman & Robin."
     
  23. Blade Hoarder

    Blade Hoarder Registered

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    Holy crap, this film in 4k is a sight to behold. Still the best designed comic film ever. A great palette cleanser after that ghastly Dark Phoenix.
     
  24. TheGuy

    TheGuy Dwelling under the Batcave

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  25. JimThompson

    JimThompson Registered

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    Burton's Batman remains my favorite. Love this movie!
     

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